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Catalogue and General Bulletin 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Savannah, Georgia 
1974-1975 



* 






Cover Pictures: Campus Scene, the original Armstrong building, Savannah Beach 
Campus Scene 



A Four-Year College in the 
University System of Georgia 

ARMSTRONG STATE 
COLLEGE 



SUMMER FALL 



WINTER SPRING 



1974-1975 



Volume XXXIX 



Number 14 



Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
Association of Georgia Colleges 

American Association for Colleges of 
Teacher Education 



738S5& 



• 


CALENDAR FOR 1974 


• 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


13 141516171819 


14151617181920 


14151617181920 


13141516171819 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 31 


28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


27 28 29 3031 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


1 2 


12 3 4 


1 2 3 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


1011 1213141516 


12131415161718 


11 121314151617 


1011 1213141516 


17 1819 20 2122 23 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


171819 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 2 


1 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 1011 121314 


8 9 1011 121314 


1011 1213141516 


9 1011 12131415 


15 1617181920 21 


15 1617181920 21 


171819 20 2122 23 


16 17181920 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 


29 30 31 


31 


30 







• 


CALENDAR FOR 1975 


• 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


12131415161718 


13141516171819 


13141516171819 


12131415161718 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


20 2122 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 2122 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 3031 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


1 


1 2 3 


1 2 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 1011 12131415 


11 121314151617 


1011 1213141516 


9 1011 12131415 


16171819 20 2122 


1819 20 2122 2324 


171819 20 2122 23 


1617 1819 20 2122 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 






31 


30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 1011 121314 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


7 8 9 1011 1213 


9 1011 12131415 


151617181920 21 


14151617181920 


14151617181920 


1617181920 2122 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


2122 23 24 25 26 27 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 


28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


30 31 









CONTENTS 



CALENDAR 7 

I. GOVERNING BOARD, ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY 11 
Members of the Board of Regents 
Staff of the Board of Regents 
Officers of Administration 
Heads of Departments 
Administrative Staff 
The Faculty 
Armstrong College Commission 

II. HISTORY, PURPOSE AND PROGRAMS 27 

History of the College 
Purpose 

Graduate Programs 
Four- Year Degrees 
Two-Year Degrees 
Pre-Professional Programs 
Georgia Intern Program 
Office of College and Community Services 
Evening Classes 
Neighborhood Continuing Education 

Center 
Office of Development 
Office of Computer Services 
Academic Skills Laboratory 

Student Exchange Program with Savannah State College 
NROTC Program 
Library 

III. ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 34 

General Information 

Requirements for Freshman Applicants 

Conditional Admission 

Advanced Placement 

Requirements for Transfer Applicants 

Continuing Education Students 

Readmission of Former Students 

Transient Students 

Early Admission and Joint Enrollment Programs 

Armstrong State College/High School Accelerated Program 

Foreign Students 

Admission of Veterans 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Registration 



Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

Admission to: 
Associate in Arts Degree Program in Nursing 
Bachelor of Science Degree Program in Nursing 
Associate in Science Degree Program in Dental Hygiene 

Admission to the Graduate Program 

IV. FEES 53 

Application Fee 
Matriculation Fee 
Out of State Tuition 
Student Activity Fee 
Health /Service Fee 
Athletic Fee 
Applied Music Fees 
Late Registration Fee 
Change of Schedule Fee 
Graduation Fee 
Transcript Fee 
Summary of Fees 
Privilege Fees 
Refunds 
Short Courses 

V. FINANCIAL AIDS 57 

Financial Aids 

Financial Aid Planning and Priority Schedule 

Scholarships 

State Financial Aid Programs 

Federal Financial Aid Programs 

Other Sources of Financial Aid at Armstrong State College 

Government Benefits 

VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 65 

Academic Advisement 
Relating to Degree Requirements 
Course and Study Load 
Classification of Students 

Permission for Overload or Courses at Another College 
Reports and Grades 
Honors 
Attendance 

Physical Education Program 
Academic Probation and Dismissal 
Repeating Courses 
Dropping Courses 
Withdrawing from College 
Auditing 



Rising Junior English Examination 

Honor Code 

Graduate Program Regulations 

VII. STUDENT SERVICES, ACTIVITIES 81 

Counseling Services 

Veterans Services 

Testing Services 

Orientation 

Placement Office 

Conduct 

Student Activities and Organizations 

Student Government 

Student Publications 

Health 

Dental Hygiene Services 

Alumni Office 

Housing 

Athletics 

Intramurals 

Cultural Opportunities 

Armstrong Summer Theatre 

VIII. DEGREE PROGRAMS 87 

University System Core Curriculum 
Armstrong Core Curriculum 
Diagnostic Tests in English and Mathematics 
State Requirements in History and Government 
Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and 

the Bachelor of Science Degrees 
Teacher Education Programs 
Business Administration Degree Programs 
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 
Bachelor of Arts in Social Work 
Bachelor of Science in Education (Mathematics and 

Physical Education) 
Bachelor of Music Education 
Nursing Degree Programs 
Dental Hygiene Degree Programs 
Criminal Justice Degree Programs 
Associate in Science in Mental Health Work 
Associate in Arts 
Graduate Programs 
Complete List of Major Programs-Four Year 

and Two Year Degrees, Graduate Degrees 



IX. DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS AND 117 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Academic Skills Laboratory 
Department of Biology 
Department of Business Administration 
Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Department of Criminal Justice 
Department of Dental Hygiene 
Department of Education 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of History and Political Science 
Department of Languages and Literature 
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science 
Department of Nursing 
Department of Physical Education 
Department of Psychology and Sociology 

INDEX 222 





ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1974-1975 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1974 

May 17. Freshman and transfer students should file all 

papers required in the application for admission 

by this date. 
31. Transient students (for Summer Quarter only) 

should file all papers required in the application 

for admission by this date. 
June 10. Registration. Rising Junior English Examination. 

11. Classes begin. 

12. Last day to register for credit. 

13. Last day to enroll in any class. 

18. Rising Junior English Examination. 

19. Comparative Guidance and Placement Examina- 
tion. 

22. History and Government examinations (appli- 
cation deadline, May 30). 
July 2. Diagnostic examination for placement in begin- 

ning English classes. 
4. Holiday. 

8. Mid-term reports due. 

11. Diagnostic examination for placement in begin- 
ning Mathematics classes. 
15-19. Pre-advisement for the Fall Quarter. 

19. Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 
August 5. Last day of classes. 

6. Reading day. 
7-9. Examinations. 

9. Graduation. 



August 19, 

September 2 



16. 
17. 



FALL QUARTER, 1974 

Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

Freshman and transfer students should file all 
papers required in the application for admission 
by this date. 

Diagnostic examinations for placement in begin- 
ning English and Mathematics classes. 
First Faculty Meeting. 

Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 



18. 
18. 
19,20. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
October 1. 

19. 

24. 

30. 
31. 

November 4-8. 
19. 



December 



28,29. 

2. 
3. 

4-6. 
9. 



Orientation. 

Advisement of sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 
Registration. Rising Junior English Examination. 
Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit. 
Last day to enroll in any class. 
Rising Junior English Examination. 
History and Government examinations (appli- 
cation deadline, September 26). 
Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning English classes. 
Mid-term reports due. 

Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning Mathematics classes. 
Pre-advisement for the Winter Quarter. 
Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

Thanksgiving Holidays (Begin at 12:30 P.M. on 
November 27). 
Last day of classes. 
Reading day. 
Examinations. 
Christmas vacation begins. 



December 


13 


January 


2 
3 
6 

7 

8 

18 




19 




31 


February 


4 


March 


10-14 

10 

11 

12-14 

17-21 



WINTER QUARTER, 1975 

Freshman and transfer students should file all 
papers required in the application for admission 
by this date. 

Registration. Rising Junior English Examination. 
Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit. 
Last day to enroll in any class. 
Rising Junior Examination. 

History and Government examinations (applica- 
tion deadline, December 20). 
Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning English classes. 

Mid-term reports due. Diagnostic examination 
for placement in beginning Mathematics classes. 
Pre-advisement for the Spring Quarter. 
Last day of classes. 
Reading day. 
Examinations. 
Spring recess. 



SPRING QUARTER, 1975 



March 



April 



May 



June 



7. Freshman and transfer students should file all 
papers required in the application for admission 
by this date. 

24. Registration. Rising Junior English Examination. 

25. Classes begin. 

26. Last day to register for credit. 

27. Last day to enroll in any class. 

1. Rising Junior Examination. 

19. History and Government examinations (applica- 
tion deadline, March 28). 

24. Mid-term reports due. 

25. Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning English classes. 

29. Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning Mathematics classes. 

5-9. Pre-advisement for the Summer Quarter. 
24. Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

30. Last day of classes. 

31. Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning Mathematics classes. 

2. Reading day. 
3-5. Examinations. 

5. Graduation. 



May 



June 



July 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1975 

16. Freshman and transfer students should file all 
papers required in the application for admission 
by this date. 

30. Transient students (for Summer Quarter only) 
should file all papers required in the applica- 
tion for admission by this date. 
5. Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

13. Registration. Rising Junior English Examination. 

16. Classes begin. 

17. Last day to register for credit. Rising Junior 
English Examination. 

18. Last day to enroll in any class. 

21. History and Government examinations (applica- 
tion deadline, May 30). 

2. Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning English classes. 

4. Holiday. 



August 



9. Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning Mathematics classes. 

14. Mid-term reports due. 

15. Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

14-18. Pre-advisement for the Fall Quarter. 

7. Last day of classes. 

8. Reading day. 
11-13. Examinations. 

13. Graduation. 



August 15. 

September 3. 



October 



15. 

16-19. 

19. 
22-23. 

24. 

25. 

26. 
7. 

18. 

22. 

24. 

28. 



November 3-7. 
27-28. 



December 



4. 

5, 

8-10. 

11. 



FALL QUARTER, 1975 

Comparative Guidance and Placement Exami- 
nation. 

Freshman and transfer students should file all 
papers required in the application for admission 
by this date. 

Diagnostic examinations for placement in be- 
ginning English and Mathematics classes. 
First Faculty Meeting. Comparative Guidance 
and Placement Examination. 
Orientation. 

Advisement of sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 
Registration. Rising Junior English Examination. 
Classes begin. 

Last day to register for credit. 
Last day to enroll in any class. 
Rising Junior Examination. 

History and Government examinations (applica- 
tion deadline, September 26). 
Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning English classes. 
Mid-term reports due. 

Diagnostic examination for placement in be- 
ginning Mathematics classes. 
Pre-advisement for the Winter Quarter. 
Thanksgiving Holidays (Begin at 12:30 P.M. on 
November 26). 
Last day of classes. 
Reading day. 
Examinations. 
Christmas Vacation begins. 



10 



I. GOVERNING BOARD, 
ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES A. HARRIS, Chairman Ocilla 

JOHN A. BELL, JR., Vice Chairman Dublin 

W. LEE BURGE Atlanta 

JESSE HILL, JR Atlanta 

MILTON JONES Columbus 

JAMES D. MADDOX Rome 

MRS. HUGH PETERSON, SR Alley 

LAMAR R. PLUNKETT Bowdon 

JOHN R. RICHARDSON Conyers 

P. R. SMITH Winder 

JOHN I. SPOONER Donalsonville 

DAVID H. TISINGER Carrollton 

SAM A. WAY, III Hawkinsville 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 



STAFF OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS 

GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR Chancellor 

JOHN O. EIDSON Vice Chancellor 

JOHN W. HOOPER Associate Vice Chancellor 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretary 

SHEALY E. McCOY Vice Chancellor-Fiscal 

Affairs and Treasurer 
JAMES E. BOYD Vice Chancellor 

Academic Development 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Vice Chancellor-Construction 

and Physical Plant 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor-Research 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR Vice Chancellor-Services 

HARRY B. O'REAR Vice Chancellor-Health Affairs 

JAMES L. CARMON Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Computing Systems 

HASKIN R. POUNDS Assistant Vice Chancellor 

MRS. HUBERT L. HARRIS Assistant Vice Chancellor-Personnel 

ROBERT M. JOINER Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Communications 

HARRY H. MURPHY, JR director of Public Information 

C. C. MURRAY Director, Interinstitutional Programs 

in International Affairs 



11 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

HENRY L. ASHMORE President 

H. DEAN PROPST Dean of the College 

JOSEPH V. ADAMS Associate Dean for Instruction 

and Graduate Studies 

DONALD D. ANDERSON Dean for College and 

Community Services 

JOSEPH A. BUCK Acting Dean for Student Affairs 

JULE R. STANFIELD Comptroller 

JAMES A. EATON Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, 

Savannah State College 

GEORGE S. HUNNICUTT Registrar and Director of Admissions 

JAMES O. BAKER Assistant to the President 

and Director of Development 

BILL E. ALEXANDER Athletic Director 

ARTHUR O. PROSSER Associate Comptroller 

D. RAY TRIPP Director of Student Financial Aid 

LYNN BENSON Counselor and Psychometrist 

J. PHILLIP COOK Counselor 

PARKER F. DAVIS Associate Director of Admissions 

JAMES MAJORS Director of Public Information 

STANLEY WARREN Systems Analyst 

DENNIS PRUITT Director of Student Activities 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

JOHN R. HANSEN Academic Skills Laboratory 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, JR biology 

ORANGE W. HALL Business Administration 

HENRY E. HARRIS Chemistry and Physics 

* JAMES W. WITT Criminal Justice 

RICHARD M. STEINKE Dental Hygiene 

WILLIAM W. STOKES Education 

J. HARRY PERSSE Fine Arts 

ROGER K. WARLICK History and Political Science 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III Languages and Literature 

GEORGE W. SLOAN Librarian 

RICHARD M. SUMMERVILLE Mathematics and 

Computer Science 

SISTER M. BON A VENTURE OETGEN Nursing 

ROY J. SIMS Physical Education 

CLARKE S. WORTHINGTON Psychology and Sociology 



*On leave of absence, Summer and Fall Quarters, 1974 
12 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Richard F. Baker Superintendent, Buildings and Grounds 

Thomas Nease Manager, College Center 

Thomas M. Kinder Assistant Athletic Director 

Bobby W. Welch Administrative Assistant to the 

Athletic Director 

Miss Majorie A. Mosely Alumni Secretary 

Mrs. Evelyn Harrington Secretary to the President 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Carter Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Mrs. Carolynn R. New Secretary to the Associate Dean 

for Instruction and Graduate Studies 

Mrs. Donna Hardie Secretary to the Dean for 

College and Community Services 

Mrs. Naomi Lantz Secretary to the Dean for Student Affairs 

Mrs. Launa Q. Johns Secretary to the Comptroller 

Mrs. Susan Thrash Departmental Secretary, Office of 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Doris Cole Secretary to the Director of 

Student Activities 

Mrs. Eleanor Roan Secretary to the Registrar and Director 

of Admissions 

Mrs. Joyce Weldy Secretary to the Registrar for Records 

Miss Gail Arms Secretary-Transcript Credit Analyst 

Mrs. Helen Schoonover Secretary, Admissions 

Mrs. Bertis Jones IBM Operator 

Mrs. Harriet Charlotte IBM Operator 

Mrs. Joy Letchworth Receptionist, Registrar 

Mrs. Vicki Akins Graduate Records Clerk 

Mrs. Eugenia Edwards Library Technician 

Maintenance, Library 

Mrs. Edith J. Meyer Head, Circulation, Library 

Mrs. Mae Rushing Library Secretary 

Mrs. Beatrice Taylor Acquisitions Assistant, Library 

Mrs. Susie Chirbas Cataloging Assistant, Library 

Mrs. Jan Bosque Cataloging Assistant, Library 

Mrs. Hazel P. Thompson Periodicals Assistant, Library 

Mrs. Rosemary Anglin Accounting and Insurance Clerk 

Mrs. Jane Holland Cashier 

Mr. John O. Hunnicutt Inventory Control Clerk 

Mrs. Janice Shaloski Machine Operator 

Miss Virginia Cafiero Clerk 

Mrs. Bonnie Meade Secretary to the Superintendent of 

Buildings and Grounds 



13 



Mrs. Carol Megathlin Secretary to the Academic Skills 

Laboratory 

Mrs. Mary Ann Cannossa Secretary to the Department 

of Biology 

Mrs. Sandra Andrews Secretary to the Department of 

Business Administration 
Miss Bobbie Jean Sapp . . .Secretary to the Department of Chemistry 

and Physics 

Mrs. Elizabeth P. Molpus Secretary to the Department of 

Criminal Justice 

Mrs. Faye A. Pingel Secretary to the Department of 

Dental Hygiene 

Mrs. Frances McGlohon Secretary to the Department of 

Education 
Mrs. Kathryn Wasson .... Secretary to the Department of Fine Arts 

Mrs. Beverly Wells Secretary to the Department of 

History and Political Science 

Mrs. Virginia D. Barry Secretary to the Department of 

Languages and Literature 

Mrs. Rebecka Patillo Secretary to the Department of 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Mrs. Miriam Schuman Secretary to the Department of Nursing 

Mrs. Gerry Price Secretary to the Department of 

Physical Education 

Mrs. Lois Rich Secretary to the Department of 

Psychology and Sociology 

Mrs. Eleanor Suchower Secretary, Off-Campus Social 

Work Center 

Mrs. Betty Hunnicutt Secretary to the Director of 

Public Information 

Edward Urbanz Assistant Superintendent, 

Buildings and Grounds 

Miss Elizabeth Pound Manager, Bookstore 

Mr. Russell Rawlings Assistant Manager, Bookstore 

Mrs. Jo Weeks Campus Nurse 

Miss Dorothy Olson Receptionist, PBX Operator 

Mrs. Theresa Ferreira Offset Press Operator 

Augustus M. Stalnaker Supervisor of Mail 



14 



THE FACULTY 

JOSEPH V. ADAMS, B.A., Tennessee Temple College; M.A., Baylor 
University; Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Associate Dean for Instruction and Graduate Studies 
Professor of Psychology 

BILL E. ALEXANDER, A.B., Morris Harvey College; M.E., Georgia 
Southern College 

Athletic Director 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

JOSEPHINE D. ALEXANDER, B.S., M.S.T., Georgia Southern 
College 

Temporary Instructor in Business Administration 

JAMES E. AMBROSE, B.M., Oberlin Conservatory; M.M., University 
of South Florida 

Temporary Instructor in Music 

M. LORRAINE ANCHORS, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 

Professor of English 

DONALD D. ANDERSON, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., 
Peabody College; Ed.D., Auburn University 

Dean for College and Community Services 
Associate Professor of Education 

HENRY L. ASHMORE, B.A.E., M.A.E., D.Ed., University of Florida 

President 

JAMES O. BAKER, A.B., Mercer University 

Assistant to the President and Director of Development 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

*ARDELLA PATRICIA BALL, A.B., Fisk University; M.S.L.S., 

Atlanta University 

Instructional Development Librarian 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

ADELINE Z. BARBER, A.B., Tift College; M.R.E., Southern 
Seminary; Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Education 

GEORGE H. BEDWELL, B.S., Samford University; M.S., University 
of Alabama 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

W. ORSON BEECHER, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., 
University of Georgia 

Professor of History 



15 



DOROTHY G. BELL, B.S.N.Ed., University of Georgia; M.N., 
Emory University 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Assistant to the Head of the Department for the B.S. Program 

ALEX D. BELTZ, B.A., M.A., Walla Walla College; B.A. of Ed., 
Western Washington State; Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Associate Professor of Biology 

LYNN BENSON, A.B., M.Ed., University of Georgia 
Counselor and Psychometrist 

SARVAN K. BHATIA, B.A., M.A., Punjah University; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

Professor of Economics 

MADALINE P. BONEY, A.B., Winthrop College; M.Ed., Georgia 
Southern College; Ed.S., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of History 

STEPHEN P. BRANDON, B.M.E., University of Kansas, Lawrence; 
M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Catholic University 
Assistant Professor of Music 

JOHN G. BREWER, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

GLENN F. BRIERCHECK, B.S., M.A., University of Connecticut 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

S. KENT BROOKS, B.A., M.A., University of Texas 
Assistant Professor of English 

MOONYEAN S. BROWER, B.S., M.A., University of Massachusetts 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

GEORGE E. BROWN, B.A., Armstrong State College 
Instructor in Social Work 

**HUGH R. BROWN, B.S., Xavier University; M.A.T., St. Michael's 
College 

Assistant Professor of English 
Academic Skills Laboratory 

JOSEPH A. BUCK, B.A., Auburn University; M.S., Florida State 
University 

Acting Dean for Student Affairs 

RUBYEN M. CHAMBLESS, B.B.A., University of Georgia; M.B.A., 
Ohio State University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

ROSS L. CLARK, B.A., Ph.D., Tulane University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

16 



BERNARD J. COMASKEY, B.A., Fordham College; M.A., New 
York University 

Assistant Professor of History 

J. PHILLIP COOK, B.S., University of Georgia; M.Ed., West Georgia 
College 

Counselor 

ELLEN A. COTTRELL, B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Ed., Georgia 
Southern College 

Temporary Assistant Professor of English 
Academic Skills Laboratory 

TERESA ANN COURSEY, B.S., West Liberty State College 
Instructor in Dental Hygiene 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Professor of Political Science 

BENNA E. CUNNINGHAM, B.S., University of Evansville; M.S., 
University of Kentucky 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, JR., B.S., College of Charleston; M.S., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Head, Department of Biology 
Professor of Biology 

*LAMAR W. DAVIS, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; 
Certified Public Accountant 

Professor of Business Administration 

WILLIAM R. DeCASTRO, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.B.A., 
University of Oklahoma 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

*ELIZABETH A. DENHAM, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.S.S.W., 
University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Social Work 

WILLIAM KEITH DOUGLAS, B.A., Franklin and Marshall College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

JOHN DONALD DUNCAN, B.S., College of Charleston; M.A., 
University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Emory University 
Associate Professor of History 



17 



THOMAS R. EASON, B.S., Union University; M.B.A., Ph.D., 

University of Mississippi 

Professor of Economics 

WILLIAM L. EASTERLING, B.S., Western Carolina College; M.A., 
Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Diploma, Sor- 
bonne, France 

Professor of French and Spanish 

JAMES A. EATON, A.B., Virginia State College; B.D., Howard 
University; M.A., Boston University; Ed.D., Columbia University 
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies 
Savannah State College 

STANLEY ETERSQUE, B.S., Florida State University; M.A.T., 
Duke University 

Director of Computer Services 
Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

JOHN FINDEIS, B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

***MURRAY T. GINSBERG, D.D.S., Emory University 
Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

MARY B. GOETTE, A.B., Georgia State College for Women 
Teaching Associate in Chemistry 

JIMMIE F. GROSS, B.A., Baylor University; B.D., Southern Baptist 

Seminary; M.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 

LAURENT J. GUILLOU, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

ORANGE W. HALL, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; 
M.B.A., Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

JOHN R. HANSEN, B.S., Troy State College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 

University of Georgia 

Head, Academic Skills Laboratory 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



18 



CLIFFORD E. HARDWICK, III, B.S., Savannah State College; M. 
Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

Director, Neighborhood Continuing Education Program 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education 

HENRY E. HARRIS, B.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 

KARL D. HARRIS, B.A., Carson Newman College; M. A., University 
of Tennessee 

Assistant Professor of English 

and Reading 
Academic Skills Laboratory 

***EARL C. HEWITT, D.D.S., University of Maryland; M.P.H., 
University of North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

JOHN S. HINKEL, M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of 
South Carolina 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 

MARY W. HORTON, B.A., LaGrange College 

Temporary Instructor in English 
Academic Skills Laboratory 

ANNE L. HUDSON, B.A., Hollins College; M.S., Ph.D., Tulane 
University 

Professor of Mathematics 

*ALPHIA MILLS HUGHES, B.S.E., State College of Arkansas; M.S., 
Louisiana State University 

Catalog Librarian 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

GEORGE S. HUNNICUTT, B.S., M.S., East Tennessee State Univer- 
sity 

Registrar and Director of Admissions 

MARVIN V. JENKINS, B.S., M.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of English 

ROBERT E. JENSEN, B.A., Atlantic Christian College; M.B.A., East 
Carolina University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

JAMES LAND JONES, B.A., University of Tulsa; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University; Ph.D., Tulane University 

Associate Professor of English 



19 



***OTIS S. JOHNSON, A.B., University of Georgia; M.S.W., Atlanta 
University 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
Savannah State College 

DALE Z. KILHEFNER, B.S., Elizabethtown College; M.S., Purdue 
University; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Calloway Professor of Literature and Philosophy 

THOMAS M. KINDER, A.B., Morris Harvey College; M.S., Marshall 
University 

Assistant Athletic Director 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

MICHAEL A. LaBURTIS, B.B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.B.A., 
Bowling Green State University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

JOSEPH M. LANE, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

OSMOS LANIER, JR., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Auburn 
University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Professor of History 

GERARD F. LENTINI, B.S., Castleton Teachers College; M.Ed., 
Florida Atlantic University; Ed.D., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Education 

MARGARET S. LUBS, B. Mus., Converse College; B.A., University 
of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Professor of English and French 

JOHN C. MCCARTHY, JR., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

KENNETH P. McKINNELL, B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Art 

ROBERT E. MAGNUS, B.G.E., University of Omaha; M.Ed., D.Ed., 
Mississippi State University 

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 



20 



***WILLIAM R. MASSEY, D.D.S., Washington University 
Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

WILLIAM L. MEGATHLIN, B.A., Presbyterian College; M.Ed., 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Acting Head, Department of Criminal Justice 
Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 

ETHEL J. MILLER, B.S., North Carolina A & T State University; 
B.S.L.S., Hampton Institute 

Coordinator of Reader Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

MARY M. MILLER, B.S.N., Medical College of Virginia 

Instructor in Nursing 

ROBERT E. L. MORGAN, B.B.A., M.A., Memphis State University; 
Certified Public Accountant 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 

RICHARD E. MUNSON, B.A., Houghton College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Rutgers University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

JAMES S. NETHERTON, B.S., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., 
University of Virginia 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

SAMUEL L. NEWBERRY, JR., B.S. Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of 
Georgia 

Associate Professor of Education 

JOHN F. NEWMAN, B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., George- 
town University; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

DAVID A. NOBLE, A.B., A.M., Boston University 
Assistant Professor of German 

SR. M. BONAVENTURE OETGEN, B.S.N.E., M.S.N.E., Catholic 
University of America 

Head, Department of Nursing 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

TIMOTHY A. O'HIGGINS, Diploma, B.A., University College, 
Dublin, Ireland 

Temporary Assistant Professor of Psychology 

DONNA G. OLMSTEAD, B.S., Armstrong State College 
Teaching Associate in Biology 



21 



JACK H. PADGETT, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

ELLIOT H. PALEFSKY, B.S., University of Georgia; Ed.M., Temple 
University 

Director, Mental Health Work Program 
Assistant Professor of Mental Health Work 

ROBERT M. PATTERSON, B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan College; M.A., 
University of Kentucky; Ph.D. Vanderbilt University 
Assistant Professor of History 

C. GLENN PEARCE, B.B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., New York 
University; Ph.D., Georgia State University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., North- 
western University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Head, Department of Languages and Literature 
Professor of English 

J. HARRY PERSSE, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., D. Mus., 
Florida State University 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 
Professor of Music 

ALLEN L. PINGEL, B.A., M.A.T., University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Associate Professor of Biology 

RUTH S. PRANTALOS, B.S., in Ed., Georgia Southern College; 
M.A. in Library Science, Peabody College 

Reference Librarian 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

JANE B. PRESTON, B.S.N. , University of Virginia 

Instructor in Nursing 

H. DEAN PROPST, B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody 
College 

Dean of the College 

Professor of English 

MARY MARGARET RALSTON, A.B., Florida State University; 
M.S.W., Tulane University 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

VIRGINIA RAMSEY, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A.T., Emory 
University 

Assistant Professor of English 



22 



EMORY H. RICHARDS, A.B., Denison University; M.B.A., Harvard 
University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Professor of Business Administration 

PAUL E. ROBBINS, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

*PATRICIA T. ROCK, B.S., Old Dominion College; M.S., Wake 
Forest University 

Instructor in Biology 

GERALD C. SANDY, B.A., Youngstown State University; M.S.L.S., 
Florida State University 

Assistant to the Head Librarian 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

NEIL B. SATTERFIELD, A.B., University of North Carolina; 
M.S.S.W., University of Tennessee 

Director, Social Work Program 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 

LEA LESLIE SEALE, B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; 
M. A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Professor of English 

JAMES L. SEMMES, B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S., 
Florida State University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

SARAH E. SHEAROUSE, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 

Temporary Vocational and Guidance Counselor 

Department of Nursing 

CHARLES T. SHIPLEY, B.A., University of North Dakota; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

ELAINE SILCOX, B.S., M.Ed., University of Florida 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

RICHARD J. SIMENSEN, B.Ed., Kenne State College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 

Assistant Professor of Education 

ROY J. SIMS, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee 

Head, Department of Physical Education 
Professor of Physical Education 

GEORGE W. SLOAN, A.B., M.L.S., University of California, 
Berkeley; M.A., University of Maryland 

Head Librarian 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

23 



HARRY H. SQUIRES, B.S., B.A., M.A., University of Florida 
Associate Professor of Business Administration 

JULE R. STANFIELD, A.A., Armstrong State College 

Comptroller 

RICHARD M. STEINKE, B.S., University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; 

D.D.S., Marquette School of Dentistry 

Head, Department of Dental Hygiene 
Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, B.A.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Education 

Professor of Education 

CEDRIC STRATTON, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; 
Ph.D., Birbeck College, London, England 

Professor of Chemistry 

ROBERT I. STROZIER, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., 
Florida State University 

Professor of English 

JOHN SUCHOWER, B.A., Fairfield University; M.A., University of 
Detroit 

Assistant Professor of English and Speech 
Director of the "Masquers" 

RICHARD M. SUMMERVILLE, B.S., Clarion State College; A.M., 
Washington University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Head, Department of Mathematics 
Professor of Mathematics 

CAROL HELEN SUTTON, B.S.N. , University of South Carolina 

Instructor in Nursing 

BARBARA G. TANENBAUM, B.S., Medical College of Georgia 
Instructor in Dental Hygiene 

LAWRENCE M. TAPP, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Tennessee 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 

ZELDA TENENBAUM, B.A., University of Georgia 

Temporary Instructor in Mental Health Work 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, III, B.S., Stetson University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Georgia 

Professor of Biology 

D. RAY TRIPP, JR., B.S., The Citadel; M.Ed., University of South 
Carolina 

Director of Student Financial Aid 



24 



VIRGINIA S. WALTON, B.S., University of Tennessee, Chattanooga; 
M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville 

Instructor in Physical Education 

PAUL E. WARD, B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Education 
Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences 

ROGER K. WARLICK, B.A., Arizona State University; Ph.D., 
Boston University 

Head, Department of History & Political Science 
Professor of History 

JOHN A. WELSH, III, A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University 

Assistant Professor of English 

SUSAN S. WHITE, B.S., Winthrop College; M.Ed., University of 
South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Speech Correction 

CHARLES C. WHITE, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., Southern 
Illinois University 

Assistant Professor of English 

MORRIS L. WHITEN, B.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

JACQUELINE F. WILSON, B.A., Stillman College; M.Ed., Savannah 
State College — Armstrong State College 

Instructor in Physical Education 

WILLIAM S. WINN, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A., University 
of North Carolina 

Emeritus Professor of Mathematics 

**JAMES W. WITT, B.A., Loyola of Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of South California 

Head, Department of Criminal Justice 
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 

CLARKE S. WORTHINGTON, B.A., University of Arizona; M.A., 
Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Emory University 

Head, Department of Psychology and Sociology 
Professor of Psychology 

THOMAS M. ZEPP, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Florida 

Assistant Professor of Economics 



♦Part-time Instructor 
**On leave of absence 
***Courtesy Appointment 95 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE COMMISSION 

The Commission controls certain endowment and scholarship funds. 
DR. IRVING VICTOR, Chairman 
MR. EDWARD BARTLETT 
MR. Y. A.BEALL, JR. 
MRS.KAYKOLE 
MR. JOHN RANITZ, JR. 
REV. HARRY NEVELLS 

Ex-Officio 

MRS. SAXON BARGERON 
THOMAS COLEMAN, The Honorable 
JOHN P. ROUSAKIS, The Honorable 
JULIAN HALLIGAN 
MR. JOHN M.WILSON 

ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE IS AN EQUAL OPPOR- 
TUNITY EMPLOYER AND IS COMMITTED TO THE OFFERING 
OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY TO ALL STUDENTS 
REGARDLESS OF RACE, SEX, CREED, OR NATIONALITY. 




26 



II. HISTORY PURPOSE AND PROGRAMS 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 1935, as 
Armstrong Junior College, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City 
of Savannah to meet a pressing need for a college in the community. 
The college was housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city 
from the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the years built or 
acquired five additional buildings in the Forsythe Park and Monterey 
Square areas. The college, as Armstrong College of Savannah, became 
a two-year unit in the University System of Georgia on January 1, 
1959, under the control of the Regents of the University System. In 
1962, the Mills B. Lane Foundation purchased a new campus site of 
over 200 acres located on Abercorn Extension. The new campus, 
with eight new buildings, was occupied in December, 1965. 

In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Armstrong the status of a 
four-year college, with the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration. 
President Henry L. Ashmore, who succeeded President Foreman M. 
Hawes, on July 1, 1964, was charged with the responsibility of 
developing the institution from junior to senior college status. A 
junior year was added to the college curriculum in 1966-67, with the 
senior year added in 1967-68 and the first four-year degrees awarded 
at the spring, 1968 commencement. The college now offers more 
than twenty major programs leading to baccalaureate degrees, and, in 
addition, the two-year associate degree in nursing, dental hygiene, 
mental health work and in criminal justice. Effective in the 1971-72 
academic year, the Board of Regents of the University System of 
Georgia authorized Armstrong State College and Savannah State 
College to offer joint programs leading to the M.B.A. and M.S. in 
Elementary Education degrees. Additional programs in Teacher 
Education at the secondary level were initiated Summer Quarter, 
1972. 

The academic community includes approximately 3,000 students 
and 120 full-time faculty members. Armstrong State College was 
fully accredited as a senior institution by the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools in December, 1968, with accreditation 
retroactive to January 1, 1968, and was re-accredited in December, 
1972. The Joint Graduate Program was fully accredited by the 
Southern Association in December, 1973. 



27 



PURPOSE 

Armstrong State College is a multi-purpose institution offering 
degree programs in the liberal arts, sciences, and a number of 
specialized fields. As a service to the community, it also provides a 
continuing education program for those who have non-degree 
objectives. The College strives to maintain the flexibility and 
adaptability which activated its growth and change of status in less 
than thirty-five years from a small city-supported junior college to a 
senior college in the University System of Georgia. Therefore, the 
College defines its present purpose in the following terms: 

to provide modern facilities and a professional staff in an 
environment that promotes the free exchange of ideas; 

to bring each student to a better realization of his own 
intellectual, emotional, and spiritual potential by providing 
academic programs in the humanities, natural sciences, and 
social sciences; 

to develop the student's technical and analytical skills through 
programs leading to professional degrees in a number of areas, 
including Allied Health, Business Administration, Criminal 
Justice, and Teacher Education; 

to offer opportunities for continuing education through sympo- 
sia, conferences, institutes, and courses unrelated to degree 
programs; 

to make available the full resources of the College through 
involvement in research projects, public service activities, and 
other programs sponsored by the community. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Beginning with the Fall Quarter of 1971, Armstrong State College 
joined with Savannah State College to offer a joint program of 
graduate work. Faculty and other resources of both institutions are 
drawn upon equally to operate the program, and degrees are awarded 
jointly by the two schools. The Joint Graduate Program offers 
instruction leading to the Master of Business Administration degree, 
and the Master of Education degree in Elementary Education and in 
Special Education (Behavior Disorders) as well as in the secondary 
teaching fields of Biology, Chemistry, English, Mathe- 
matics, History and Political Science. The master's programs are 
designed to provide opportunities for further professional growth, 



28 



for expanding professional and cultural backgrounds, and for 
extending knowledge and understanding in an area of specialty. 

For further information about these programs, contact the 
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at either Armstrong State 
College or Savannah State College, requesting a copy of the Graduate 
Bulletin. 



FOUR-YEAR DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, French, music, 
political science, psychology and economics. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, and 
mathematics. 

Bachelor of Business Administration in the fields of accounting, 
management, management-marketing, economics, finance, business 
education and information systems. 

Bachelor of Science in Education-Speech Correction. 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. 

Bachelor of Arts in Social Work. 

Bachelor of Music Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in Physical 
Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in Mathematics. 



TWO-YEAR DEGREES 

The following two-year degrees are offered as preparation for 
higher degrees in the liberal arts and professions and for positions in 
business: 

Associate in Arts. 

Associate in Arts in Nursing. 

(This degree prepares graduates for the state examination for 
licensure as registered nurses.) 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice. 

Associate in Science in Mental Health Work. 



29 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Armstrong State College offers the first year of a program in 
veterinary medicine; the first two years of programs in engineering, 
forestry, industrial management, physics, pharmacy; the first three 
years, or the entire pre-professional programs, in dentistry, law, 
medicine, optometry, and other fields. Among specialized pre-pro- 
fessional programs are the following: 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE-GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF 
TECHNOLOGY DUAL-DEGREE PROGRAM 

Upon completion of the first three years of academic work at 
Armstrong, the student may enroll for two subsequent years at 
Georgia Institute of Technology. After completing the requirements 
of the two cooperating institutions, the student will be awarded a 
baccalaureate degree from Armstrong State College and a baccalau- 
reate degree in one of a number of academic areas from Georgia 
Institute of Technology. For further information on this dual-degree 
program, the student should contact the Office of the Dean of the 
College. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM IN MEDICINE 

Any student who completes 140 quarter hours in academic 
courses at Armstrong State College with an average of C (2.0) or 
better is eligible, upon successful completion of the prescribed course 
of study for the first year at an accredited school of medicine, for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science (Medicine) from Armstrong State 
College. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM IN DENTISTR Y 

Any student who completes 140 quarter hours in academic 
courses at Armstrong State College with an average of C (2.0) or 
better is eligible, upon successful completion of the prescribed course 
of study for the first year of an accredited school of dentistry, for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science (Dentistry) from Armstrong State 
College. 



GEORGIA INTERN PROGRAM 

Students at Armstrong State College may participate in the 
Georgia Legislative Internship Program. The program provides an 
opportunity for students to observe first-hand and to participate in 
the legislative process and to advance their academic experience. 
They are assigned to legislative committees or to a legislative office in 

30 



either the House or the Senate, working directly under and 
responsible to a committee chairman or office head. Students may 
receive academic credit for this experience. They must be enrolled 
full-time and be in good academic standing at the College. For 
further information, consult the Head of the Department of History 
and Political Science. 



OFFICE OF COLLEGE AND COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Short Courses, Workshops and Seminars are planned, organized 
and administered by the office in response to group interest, or to 
meet a community need brought to the attention of the Dean for 
College and Community Services. All are offered on a non-credit 
basis and, except in a very few cases, there are no special 
requirements or prerequisites for admission. A brochure of courses, 
under the heading of "Short Courses" is mailed before the beginning 
of every quarter; anyone wishing to do so may have his name placed 
on this mailing list. Subjects covered vary widely; the series is 
designed to offer something to appeal to almost any adult taste, from 
Computer Programming to Interior Decoration. The Dean is always 
glad to arrange courses for candidates preparing to take professional 
examinations in engineering, insurance, real estate, and in other 
areas; the college has been approved as an Examination Center for a 
number of these examinations. One-day workshops are also planned 
and managed by this office. 



EVENING CLASSES 

In addition to the full daytime schedule, Armstrong offers a 
schedule of classes in the evening, including most of the required 
courses for some degree programs. Students employed during the day 
must limit their enrollment to one or two courses each quarter. 



NEIGHBORHOOD CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTER 

The Neighborhood Continuing Education Center is a cooperative 
endeavor of Armstrong State College, Savannah State College, 
Georgia Southern College, and the University of Georgia. The Center 
provides a continuing education program for low income residents in 
a Savannah Model Cities area neighborhood. The major objective is 
to utilize the combined resources of the cooperating institutions to 
provide educational experiences suited to the needs of the citizens 
within this area. 



31 



OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT 

The purpose of the Office of Development is to promote 
community involvement in the college and participation by the 
college in federal and other grant sponsored activities. This office 
also gives assistance to the process of long-range planning and 
development at the college. 



OFFICE OF COMPUTER SERVICES 

This office coordinates the campus-wide system of computer 
services. The Director also provides technical assistance to the faculty 
and staff of the college in the development of computer programs 
and systems. Through participation in the University System 
Computer Network, information processing devices located on 
campus are connected via a direct telephone line to the large 
computers located at Georgia State University and the University of 
Georgia. 



ACADEMIC SKILLS LABORATORY 

The purpose of the Academic Skills Laboratory is to provide aid 
for those students experiencing difficulty in the areas of reading, 
mathematics, or English. An individualized program is planned and 
conducted after identification of the student's needs through 
diagnostic procedures. 

A student may be referred to the Laboratory by a faculty member 
or may refer himself. The student may enroll for five to fifteen 
institutional credit hours per quarter. The student's program may be 
completed in less than a full quarter, or may be continued over two 
or more quarters. 



STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM 
WITH SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College or at Armstrong 
State College as a full-time student has the privilege of taking one 
course with his Dean's approval at the other college without paying 
an additional fee. A student may take two courses in his home 
college paying full fees and one course at the other college, which 
will be transferred back to his home college, or a student with at 
least a "B" average in the preceding quarter may take three courses 
at his home college, paying full fees, and register at the other college 
for an additional course without additional cost. No restrictions are 
placed on the number of courses taken at the other college if the 

32 



student is enrolled in the Joint Graduate Program or in the 
undergraduate cooperative programs in Criminal Justice, Music 
Education, Physical Education, or Social Work. 

A student may obtain in the Registrar's Office the proper form for 
permission to register for courses at Savannah State College. 



NROTC PROGRAM 

Students at Armstrong State College may enroll in the Naval 
Reserve Officers Training program offered on the Savannah State 
College campus. For further information, consult the Registrar at 
Armstrong State College; the Commanding Officer, NROTC Unit, 
Savannah State College; or the Savannah State College Bulletin and 
General Catalog. 



LIBRARY 

The Lane Library is centrally located on the campus and is 
convenient to classrooms and student center. The building is 
air-conditioned, carpeted and attractively furnished. The facilities of 
the library include seating for four hundred eighty-five readers, 
listening and microform facilities, study rooms, individual study 
carrels, general reading, reference and special collection areas. An 
addition to the Library, more than doubling its present size, has been 
approved by the Board of Regents of the University System. 

The library contains approximately 83,000 volumes and receives 
750 periodicals and newspapers. In addition to these, there are 2,400 
reels of microfilm, 21,300 units of microforms and other resources. 



The collection is classified according to the Library of Congress 
classification scheme and all materials with the exception of reserve 
books and special collections are on open shelves. A library 
handbook giving an introduction to the library and its use is available 
to each student. 





nra 



33 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application forms for admission to Armstrong State College are 
attached to this Bulletin and provided by the Admissions Office 
upon request. An application cannot be considered until all required 
forms are properly executed and returned to the Admissions Office. 
Applications should be on file in the Admissions Office at least 
twenty days before the opening of the quarter in which the applicant 
wishes to enter. 

The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before 
registration date and must give evidence of good moral character, 
promise of growth and development, seriousness of purpose, and a 
sense of social responsibility. Armstrong State College reserves the 
right to examine and appraise the character, the personality, and the 
physical fitness of the applicant. The College further reserves the 
right to examine any applicant by the use of psychological, 
achievement, and aptitude tests and to require additional bio- 
graphical data and an interview before the applicant is accepted or 
rejected. If an interview is required, the applicant will be notified. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept any 
or all of the credits from any high school or other institution, 
notwithstanding its accredited status, when the College determines 
through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or other institution is for any reason deficient or 
unsatisfactory. The judgment of the College on this question shall be 
final. 

On the basis of achievement as reflected by high school or college 
grades and academic potential as shown by scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test, an evaluation of each applicant's readiness to 
undertake college work will be made. The Admissions Officer may 
refer any application to the Admissions Committee of the College for 
study and advice. 

The decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or 
rejected shall be made by the Admissions Officer in accordance with 
admission policies and subject to the applicant's right of appeal as 
provided in the policies of the Board of Regents of the University 
System. The Admissions Officer shall, as promptly as practicable, 
inform the applicant of the action taken upon his application. 



34 



The College reserves the right to terminate acceptance of 
applications when enrollment capacity is reached. The College 
further reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident 
of the State of Georgia. 

All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to 
affirm that they will abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. For 
a detailed explanation of the Honor System see the REGULATIONS 
section of this bulletin. 

Specific requirements for admission are discussed below. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMAN APPLICANTS 

1. a. Certificate of graduation from an accredited high school. A 
transcript of the applicant's high school record must be submitted by 
the high school directly to the College and must show credit for a 
minimum of sixteen units, including the following specific subjects: 

English— 4 units 

Mathematics— 2 units (One unit must be in algebra, although two 
units of algebra are desirable. For students entering the 
engineering or scientific fields, two units in algebra and one of 
geometry are needed.) 

Science— 2 units 

Social Studies— 2 units 

Other units sufficient to graduate. 

OR b. Successful completion of the General Education Develop- 
ment Test (GED) with no scores less than 45. Applicants who have 
been awarded their high school equivalence diploma with scores 
below 45 may be conditionally admitted. A score report form must 
be submitted directly to the college by the United States Armed 
Forces Institute, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (if the student took the 
test while in military service) or from the GED testing center where 
the student took the test. 

2. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. Official results of this test 
must be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date for 
submitting application for the quarter in which the student wishes to 
enroll. 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given in all states and numerous 
foreign countries in November, December, January, March, May and 
July. Students wishing to make application to take the test may 
secure application forms from their secondary school principal or 



35 



counselor, or by writing directly to the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or Box 1025, 
Berkeley, California 94701, for an application form and the Bulletin 
of Information which is available without charge. 

3. Application fee of $10 which must accompany the application 
form. This fee does not bind Armstrong State College to admit the 
applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the applicant's qualifica- 
tions. The fee will not be credited toward the matriculation fee in 
the event that the applicant is accepted as a student, and it will not 
be refunded in the event that the applicant does not enroll as a 
student. If he wishes to enter the institution at the beginning of a 
quarter later than that for which he is accepted, he must request 
reactivation of his application for admission. If he has not enrolled 
within one year, he must reapply and resubmit the application fee by 
the date specified. 

4. Physical examinations prior to admission are required only for 
those entering students whose medical history is such that their 
participation in required physical education instruction is not 
recommended or is limited, or when the student is under the care of 
a physician due to a special medical problem. Entering students who 
are in good health and not under the care of a physician must submit 
a signed statement to this effect along with their completed 
application for admission. 



CONDITIONAL ADMISSION 

Students who score 650 or less on the combined verbal and 
mathematics sections of the Scholastic Aptitude Test and/or who fail 
to predict the grade-point average for regular admission must take a 
battery of tests (relating to English, reading, and mathematics) 
derived from the Comparative Guidance and Placement Program of 
the College Entrance Examination Board. These students will be 
"conditionally admitted" until such time as the results of the battery 
of tests are available. These tests must be taken before the student 
first registers for classes. Students who satisfactorily complete the 
entire battery of tests will be granted full admission status. If any 
part of the test results is unsatisfactory, the student's "conditional 
admission" status will be continued and the student will be required 
to take courses in the Academic Skills Laboratory in his specific 
area(s) of weakness(es). As long as the student is on "conditional 
admission" status, he must have the classes in which he enrolls 
approved by the Head of the Academic Skills Laboratory. While the 
student may demonstrate proficiency within one quarter or two 
quarters of enrollment by achieving a grade of "satisfactory" in each 



36 



academic skills course taken, such proficiency must be demonstrated 
by the end of one academic year. If not so demonstrated, the student 
will not be permitted to continue at the college. Test dates for the 
Comparative Guidance and Placement Examination are listed in the 
Academic Calendar published in this Bulletin. 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT 
AND CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, or in some 
cases college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basis 
of the high school teacher's recommendation, the student's grade on 
the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB, and approval by 
the appropriate department head of Armstrong State College. 

College credit may be granted for satisfactory scores on the 
General Examinations of the College-Level Examination Program 
(CLEP), for satisfactory completion of appropriate courses and tests 
offered through the United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI), 
and for military service schools and experience as recommended by 
the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the 
American Council on Education. Such credits may not exceed more 
than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree. 

Specifically, the student with a strong academic background may 
demonstrate competence through departmental examinations and 
exempt the following courses: Foreign Language 101, 102, 103; 
History 251, 252; Mathematics 101, 103. Further, the student may 
be given credit by examination in Physical Science 121, 122 (10 
quarter hours); History 114, 115 (10 quarter hours); Art 200 (5 
quarter hours); Music 200 (5 quarter hours); Mathematics 101 (5 
quarter hours — must be validated by passing the second appropriate 
Mathematics course); and English 121 (5 quarter hours — must be 
validated by passing English 122). 

It is possible for a student, through a combination of the advanced 
placement and credit by examination programs, to begin his formal 
instructional program at Armstrong State College as a sophomore. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

1. Transfer applicants will follow the same procedures as fresh- 
man applicants, except that transfer applicants who will have 
achieved sophomore standing at the time of their entrance will not 
be required to submit their high school records. Such records may be 
required by the Admissions Office, but normally the transcripts of 

37 



previous college records will suffice in place of the high school 
record. A transfer applicant must ask the Registrar of each college he 
has previously attended to mail an official transcript of his record to 
the Admissions Office at Armstrong State College, regardless of the 
transferability of the credits. 

2. Transfer applicants who will enter with less than sophomore 
standing (less than 45 quarter hours completed) must meet entrance 
requirements of both freshman and transfer applicants and will be 
required to submit their high school records as well as transcripts of 
college records. 

3. A transfer applicant will not be eligible for admission to 
Armstrong State College unless he is eligible to return to the last 
college attended on the date he expects to enter Armstrong. A 
student who is on suspension from another college because of poor 
scholarship or for disciplinary reasons will not be eligible for 
admission. 

4. A transfer applicant will be considered for admission to 
Armstrong State College if, on all work attempted at other 
institutions, his academic performance as shown by his grade point 
average is equivalent to the minimum standard required by Arm- 
strong State College students of comparable standing. (See chart 
under Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy on page 71.) 

5. Credit will be given for transfer work in which the student 
received a grade of "D" or above, with the percentage of "D" grades 
not to exceed twenty (20) per cent of the total hours being 
transferred. College credit will not be allowed for such courses as 
remedial English or remedial mathematics or courses basically of 
secondary school level. 

6. Credits earned at an institution which is not a member of the 
appropriate regional accrediting agency can be accepted on a 
provisional basis only. A student transferring from an institution 
which is not a member of a regional accrediting agency must achieve 
a "C" average on his first fifteen quarter hours of work at Armstrong 
in order to be eligible to continue. In certain areas he may be 
required to validate credits by examination. In computing cumulative 
grade averages, only the work attempted at Armstrong will be 
considered. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will allow for work done 
in another institution within a given period of time may not exceed 
the normal amount of credit that could have been earned at 
Armstrong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours may 

38 



be transferred from a junior college. At least half of the courses 
required in the major field must be taken at Armstrong. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may be taken through correspondence or extension courses; 
no correspondence courses may be used to meet requirements in the 
major field or the related field for the bachelor's degree. No 
correspondence course may be taken while a student is enrolled at 
Armstrong State College without prior approval of the Dean of the 
College and the head of the department in which the student is 
majoring. Correspondence credit will not be accepted for courses in 
English composition or foreign language. 



CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS 

All military personnel and adults, age 22 years or older, who wish 
to take regularly scheduled courses for personal enrichment and 
other non-degree objectives may be enrolled for credit or as auditors. 
If these students enroll for credit, they must meet all prerequisites 
for the course involved; if they enroll as auditors, they must have the 
permission of the instructor involved. Admission of Continuing 
Education students requires: (1) evidence of high school graduation 
or possession of GED certificate or (2) transcript from last college 
attended. Students on probation or suspension will not be permitted 
to enroll in this program without approval by the Admissions 
Committee. 

A maximum of 45 quarter hours credit may be earned by students 
enrolled in this classification. Should a degree become the objective 
of a Continuing Education student, he must apply for admission as a 
degree candidate, meeting regular admission requirements. 

All college fees apply to students in this classification with the 
exception of the application fee which is not required until the 
student requests admission as a degree candidate. Military personnel 
pay fees in accordance with negotiated military contracts. 



READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student who has not been enrolled at Armstrong for one or 
more quarters must apply for readmission on a form provided by the 
Admissions Office. This requirement does not apply to students who 
do not register for courses during the summer quarter. A former 
student who has not attended another college since leaving Arm- 
strong may be readmitted provided he is not on suspension at the 
time he wishes to reenter. A former student who has attended 

39 



another college since leaving Armstrong must meet requirements for 
readmission as a transfer student or as a transient student, whichever 
is applicable. A student who is readmitted after an absence from the 
College for more than two years must meet degree requirements as 
listed in the bulletin in effect at the time of his return. 



TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

Transient student status means that a student is admitted to 
Armstrong State College only for a specified period of time, 
normally for one quarter. An applicant for transient status must file 
a regular application form and submit a statement from his Dean or 
registrar that he is in good standing and has permission to take 
specific courses at Armstrong to be transferred to his own institution 
when satisfactorily completed. Since transient students are not 
admitted as regular Armstrong students, transcriots of college work 
completed elsewhere are not usually required of such applicants. A 
transient student who wishes to remain at Armstrong longer than one 
quarter must submit an additional statement from his Dean or 
Registrar, or he must meet all requirements for regular admission as a 
transfer student. 



EARLY ADMISSION AND JOINT ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS 

Armstrong State College offers an early admission program for 
those students who have completed the eleventh grade in high school 
and who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. The 
criteria for admission to this program are the same as those listed 
below for the Accelerated Program. 

Additionally, the college cooperates with the Chatham County 
School System in the offering of a joint enrollment program which is 
an early admission program allowing the student to enroll full-time at 
the college while remaining on the rolls of his local high school. After 
successfully meeting all established criteria for the early admission 
program, the student will be awarded a high school diploma at the 
end of his freshman year in college. The college Admissions 
Committee must approve all applicants accepted for admission to the 
joint enrollment program. For further information on this program 
the prospective applicant should consult his high school counselor 
and/or request information from the Admissions Office at Armstrong 
State College. 



40 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE ACCELERATED 
PROGRAM FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

High school students who have completed the eleventh grade, who 
have met the criteria for admission to the program and who maintain 
its standards will be permitted to enroll for college credit in at least 
one course but not more than two courses each quarter at Armstrong 
State College while they complete the senior year of high school. 
Upon graduation from high school, these students will be admitted as 
regular students of the College. 

Through this program, a student may complete over two-thirds of 
the freshman year of college before he begins his regular college 
career. Students accepted in the program may choose any freshman 
course for which they meet all prerequisites, with permission of their 
high school principal or counselor and college advisor. 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program if in any quarter 
his grade in the college course is below C or his high school average in 
academic courses is below B. 

The College will consider a student for this program only upon 
written recommendation of his high school principal. In the view of 
the College, it is only the principal who can judge the circumstances 
that may make the program valuable and practicable for any student. 

To be admitted to the program a student must satisfy all of these 
criteria: 

1. written recommendation by the Principal of the high school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school; 

3. A combined verbal and math score of 1000 on CEEB tests; 

4. an average grade of B or better in academic subjects (English, 
mathematics, science, social studies, language) through the 
ninth, tenth and eleventh grades as averaged by the Armstrong 
State College Admissions Officer. 

5. written permission of the parents. 

A high school principal may recommend students following the 
fifth six-week period of the students' eleventh year. The recom- 
mendation to the College must be made by May 15th if the student 
intends to begin in the summer. The principal may recommend 
following the full eleventh year by August 15th if the student 
intends to begin in the fall. 

41 



FOREIGN STUDENTS 

It is recommended that, whenever possible, foreign students begin 
their attendance at the College in the fall quarter. The college also 
recommends that a foreign student attend an ELS language center 
prior to enrollment. (Applications for ELS are available from the 
Admissions Coordinator, ELS Language Centers, 3331 Ocean Park 
Blvd., Suite 201, Santa Monica, California 90405.) 

A student from a country other than the United States who is 
interested in attending Armstrong must meet the following require- 
ments before application is made: 

1. He must have met the requirements of freshman applicants. 

2. He must have an official transcript of his academic record 
mailed to the Admissions Office at Armstrong with an official 
translation. 

3. He must take the SAT of the College Entrance Examination 
Board in the testing center nearest his home and ask that the 
results be sent to Armstrong. 

4. He must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and ask 
that the results be sent to Armstrong. (Applications for the test 
are available from the Educational Testing Service, Box 899, 
Princeton, N. J. 08540.) 

5. He must submit a statement of financial resources prior to 
attendance. 

If the applicant meets the academic requirements for admission, 
he will be sent an application form. After it has been returned and 
approved, the applicant will be sent an 1-20 Form (1-20A and 
1-20B), which he can take to the American consul to ask for a 
student visa. When he arrives on campus, he will be tested in English 
composition for class placement. 

No scholarships are available for students who are not legal 
residents of Georgia. All foreign students must pay non-resident fees. 



ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon 
receipt of Certification of Eligibility and Entitlement from the 
Veterans Administration, veterans may attend under Public Law 358 
(Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 815 

42 



(disabled), Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans), 
or Public Law 361 (children of permanently disabled veterans). 
Students under Public Laws 358, 361, or 634 should be prepared to 
pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 



APPLICANTS SPONSORED BY VOCATIONAL 
REHABILITATION 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other 
community agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the 
beginning of any quarter to insure proper processing of applications. 



REGISTRATION 

Complete instructions concerning registration are made available 
to all students at the beginning of the registration period. Regis- 
tration includes counseling, academic advisement, selection of 
courses, enrollment in classes, and payment of fees. Full details 
regarding registration are provided to all incoming students after they 
have been approved for admission to the College. 



RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS OF THE BOARD 
OF REGENTS 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must 
establish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1. (a) If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may 
register as a resident student only upon a showing that he or 
she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period of at least 
twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

(b) No emancipated minor or person 18 years of age or older 
shall be deemed to have gained or acquired in-state residence 
status for fee purposes while attending any educational 
institution in this State, in the absence of a clear demonstration 
that he or she has in fact established legal residence in this 
State. 

2. If a person is under 18 years of age, he or she may register as a 
resident student only upon a showing that his or her supporting 
parent or guardian has been a legal resident of Georgia for a 
period of at least twelve months immediately preceding the 
date of registration. 



43 



3. A full-time faculty member of the University System and his or 
her spouse and dependent children may register on the 
payment of resident fees even though he or she has not been a 
legal resident of Georgia for the preceding twelve months. 

4. Non-resident graduate students who hold teaching or research 
assistantships requiring at least one-third time service may 
register as students in the institution in which they are 
employed on payment of resident fees. 

5. Full-time teachers in the public schools of Georgia and their 
dependent children may enroll as students in the University 
System institutions on the payment of resident fees, when such 
teachers have been legal residents of Georgia for the immedi- 
ately preceding nine months, were engaged in teaching during 
such nine month period, and have been employed to teach full 
time in the public schools of Georgia during the ensuing school 
year. 

6. All aliens shall be classified as non-resident students; provided, 
however, that an alien who is living in this country under a visa 
permitting permanent residence shall have the same privilege of 
qualifying for resident status for fee purposes as a citizen of the 
United States. 

7. Foreign students who attend institutions of the University 
System under financial sponsorship of civic or religious groups 
located in this State, may be enrolled upon the payment of 
resident fees, provided the number of such foreign students in 
any one institution does not exceed the quota approved by the 
Board of Regents for that institution. 

8. If the parents or legal guardian of a minor change his or her 
legal residence to another state following a period of legal 
residence in Georgia, the minor may continue to take courses 
for a period of twelve consecutive months on the payment of 
resident fees. After the expiration of the twelve month period 
the student may continue his registration only upon the 
payment of fees at the non-resident rate. 

9. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 
guardian on a non-resident minor, such minor will not be 
permitted to register as a resident student until the expiration 
of one year from the date of court appointment, and then only 
upon proper showing that such appointment was not made to 
avoid payment of the non-resident fees. 



44 



ADMISSION TO THE ASSOCIATE IN 
ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM IN NURSING 

Nursing calls for a variety of skills and aptitudes and offers 
unlimited opportunities for different kinds of service. Therefore, a 
candidate for the nursing program should have good physical and 
mental health as well as those personal qualifications appropriate for 
nursing. For these reasons the Admissions Committee selects 
students whose abilities, interests, and personal qualities show 
promise of success in the program and in the field of nursing. Factors 
influencing the decision of the Admissions Committee are: achieve- 
ment as shown on the secondary school record, ability as measured 
by the Scholastic Aptitude Test, motivation for nursing, health, 
personal qualities, and social adjustment. Applicants who, in the 
judgment of the Admissions Committee, present high overall 
qualifications are selected. Since applications are processed as 
received, applicants are encouraged to apply early in the senior year 
of high school or as early in the year preceding admission as possible. 
Application forms are available from the Admissions Officer of the 
College. 

The preferred age for applicants, married or single, at the time of 
entrance is 18. 

The State of Georgia requires, as do most other states, United 
States citizenship, either natural born or naturalized, for registered 
nurse licensure. Candidates for admission to the nursing program 
who are not citizens may be admitted only under certain circum- 
stances and should make individual inquiries. 



How to Apply 

1. Complete the application form for admission to Armstrong 
State College and return it with the non-refundable $10 
application fee. Mark the application For Nursing Only. 

2. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College 
Entrance Examination Board as early in the year as possible. 
When applying for the test, be certain to list Armstrong State 
College as one college to receive the scores. 

3. Have a transcript of your high school record mailed from the 
high school directly to the Admissions Office at Armstrong. (A 
transfer student should also ask the Registrar of each school or 
college she/he has previously attended to mail an official 
transcript of her/his record to the Admissions Office at 
Armstrong, regardless of the transferability of the credits.) 

45 



4. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the nursing program. 

5. Have the dental form completed by a dentist and mail to the 
Department of Nursing. 

6. Take a battery of aptitude tests on one of the dates scheduled 
on campus. Applications for this test may be obtained from the 
Department of Nursing at Armstrong State College or from the 
Director of Admissions at Armstrong State College. 

7. Send, or have sent, two letters of reference directly to the 
Department of Nursing from non-family members (teachers, 
employers, or other qualified persons) who have known you 
for at least three years. 

8. Send, or have sent, to the Department of Nursing a certified 
copy of your birth certificate. 



Other Information 

1. It is recommended that applicants who have been away from 
school for a considerable period of time enroll in at least one 
course in an accredited college of their choice during the 
school year or summer preceding their planned entrance to 
the nursing program. 

2. Except in unusual circumstances, no credit will be given for 
nursing courses taken in another school of nursing. 

3. An applicant on academic suspension or probation from 
another college will not be considered. 

4. Nursing students are responsible for providing their own 
transportation to and from campus to the clinical area (i.e., 
community hospitals and other health agencies). 

5. Armstrong State College does not provide student housing. 
The responsibility for procuring suitable housing rests with 
the student. For further information regarding housing, please 
contact the Office of Student Affairs. 

6. Students are required to wear the official student uniform of 
the nursing program. Uniforms will be ordered during the Fall 
Quarter. 



46 



7. General fees for a nursing student will be the same as for any 
other student at Armstrong. Please refer to the Fees section of 
the current Bulletin. 

8. Students are admitted to the nursing sequence courses once 
each year in the fall. Six consecutive quarters in the nursing 
program are required. Students may begin the academic 
courses required in the program in any quarter. 

9. All nursing courses must be taken in sequence. Each nursing 
course has a prerequisite beginning with Fundamentals of 
Nursing. 

10. All students must take a battery of aptitude tests. 

11. Students accepted for the nursing program will be sent 
information on supplies and equipment needed for the Fall 
Quarter approximately two weeks before the opening of 
school with approximate charges. 

12. Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way 
guarantee formal admission into the nursing program. Formal 
admission to the program is dependent upon a student's 
obtaining a passing grade of "C" in nursing and maintaining 
an overall 2.0 average first quarter. 



ADMISSION TO THE BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM IN NURSING 

This program is designed to prepare the Registered Nurse to plan, 
organize and function in middle management nursing positions in 
today's hospitals and health agencies. The prospective candidate for 
the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing must meet all criteria for 
admission to Armstrong State College. 



How to Apply 

1. Complete the application form for admission to Armstrong 
State College according to directions. Mark the application 
FOR NURSING ONLY -B.S. Program. 

2. Have a transcript of your high school, college and school of 
nursing records mailed to the Admissions Office, Armstrong 
State College, 11935 Abercorn Street, Savannah, Georgia 
31406. 



47 



3. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the Department of 
Nursing — B.S. Program. 

4. Have the dental form completed by a dentist. 

5. Take Qualifying Exams for nursing courses as applicable. 

6. Have two written letters of reference (one from Director of 
School of Nursing and one from current or last employer) sent 
directly to the Armstrong Admissions Office. 

7. Contact Department of Nursing for appointment to discuss 
academic status. 

Other Information 

1. Graduation from a state approved school of nursing (associate 
degree program or hospital diploma program) is a requirement 
for admission to the B.S. degree program in Nursing. 

2. Credits earned by graduates of an associate degree program 
conducted by a legally constituted degree granting institution 
will transfer. 

3. The number of credits allowed a diploma school graduate will 
be determined by an evaluation of the applicant's school of 
nursing transcript based on criteria developed for the program. 

4. Those applicants who have not been actively employed in 
nursing within the previous five years, or who have graduated 
from a diploma school, will be required to take validating 
examinations. Satisfactory scores must be achieved in order to 
receive credit for prior nursing education. 

5. All candidates for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing 
must have passed the state board licensing examination for 
registered nurses. This requirement must be met prior to 
application for graduation. 

6. The last forty-five quarter hours of the degree program, must 
be earned at Armstrong State College. 



48 



ADMISSION TO THE ASSOCIATE IN 

SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAM IN 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

The profession of Dental Hygiene is an ideal career for individuals 
interested in science and health services. The growing and constant 
demand for graduate dental hygienists assures regular hours and good 
compensation. 

A dental hygienist works under the general supervision of a dentist 
and performs a number of dental functions. The hygienist's activities 
usually include performing oral prophylaxis (cleaning of the teeth), 
instructing patients in dental health, taking, developing and mount- 
ing dental x-rays, applying fluorides and sometimes assisting the 
dentist in chairside and laboratory duties. 

There are certain personal qualifications which are essential for a 
successful dental hygienist. These are good health, neat appearance, 
high moral character, a desire to be of service to others, and the 
ability to get along well with people. 

The Armstrong State College program consists of seven quarters of 
full time study (two academic years and the intervening summer). 
Applicants are matriculated once each year, in September. 

There are no definite age requirements or restrictions for the basic 
Dental Hygiene program. However, all applicants must be graduates 
of an accredited high school or its equivalent. Students may be either 
married or single and must be citizens of the United States, either 
natural born or naturalized. 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements for Armstrong 
State College and the Department of Dental Hygiene. 

The major part of an applicant's secondary school work should be 
in the college preparatory program and should include two years of 
mathematics. Because of the heavy emphasis on science in the dental 
hygiene curriculum, it is important that applicants have a good 
foundation in chemistry and biology. The quality of the candidate's 
work in high school English and social studies is most important in 
evaluating total qualifications for admission to the Dental Hygiene 
program. Other factors which influence the decision of the Dental 
Hygiene admissions committee are: a "C" or better average in high 
school and an acceptable score (composite-verbal and mathematical) 
on the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College 
Entrance Examination Board and on the Dental Hygiene Aptitude 
Test. 



49 



How to Apply 

1. Complete the application form for admission to Armstrong 
State College and return it with the non-refundable $10 
application fee. Mark the application For Dental Hygiene 
Only. 

2. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the dental hygiene 
program. 

3. Have the dental form completed by a dentist. 

4. Take the Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test on one of the three 
dates scheduled on campus. Applications for the Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test may be obtained from the Department 
of Dental Hygiene at Armstrong State College. 

5. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College 
Entrance Examination Board as early in the year as possible. 
When applying for the test be certain to list Armstrong State 
College as one college to receive your scores. 

6. Have a transcript of your high school record mailed from the 
high school directly to the Admissions Office at Armstrong. (A 
transfer student should also ask the Registrar of each school or 
college previously attended to mail an official academic 
transcript to the Admissions Office at Armstrong, regardless of 
the transferability of the credits) . 



Other Information 

1. It is recommended that applicants who have been away from 
school for a considerable period of time enroll in at least one 
course in an accredited college of their choice during the 
school year or summer preceding their planned entrance to 
the Dental Hygiene program. 

2. For the Associate in Science Degree, no credit will be given 
for Dental Hygiene courses taken in another school of Dental 
Hygiene, unless specifically approved by the Head of the 
Department. 

3. An applicant on academic suspension or probation from 
another college will not be considered. 



50 



4. Dental Hygiene students are responsible for providing their 
own transportation to and from campus and to community 
agencies when assigned for field experiences. 

5. Armstrong State College does not provide student housing. 
The responsibility for procuring suitable housing rests with 
the student. For further information regarding housing, please 
contact the Office of Student Affairs. 

6. Students are required to wear the official student uniform of 
the Dental Hygiene Program. Uniforms will be ordered during 
the Fall Quarter. 

7. General fees for Dental Hygiene students will be the same as 
for any other student at Armstrong. Please refer to the Fees 
section of the current Bulletin. 

8. Students are admitted to the Dental Hygiene sequence courses 
once each year in the fall. Seven consecutive quarters in the 
Dental Hygiene program are required. Students may begin the 
academic courses required in the program in any quarter. 

9. All Dental Hygiene clinical courses must be taken in sequence. 
Each Dental Hygiene course has a prerequisite beginning with 
Dental Hygiene 101. 

10. It is strongly recommended that all students take the Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test to be considered for admission. In 
order for the test scores to reach the Dental Hygiene 
Department prior to the April 15th deadline, the test should 
be taken during the fall or winter testing period. 

11. Students accepted for the Dental Hygiene program will be 
sent information on supplies and equipment needed for the 
Fall Quarter approximately two weeks before the opening of 
school with approximate charges. 

12. Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way 
guarantee formal admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. 



51 



ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Information concerning admissions requirements for graduate 
programs is available in the Graduate Bulletin. Further information 
may be obtained from the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at 
either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. 




52 



IV. FEES 



APPLICATION FEE 



The Application Fee of $10.00 is paid by each student at the time 
of initial application for admission to Armstrong State College. The 
acceptance of the Application Fee does not constitute acceptance of 
the student. This fee is not refundable. 

In addition to the application fee mentioned above, a deposit of 
$50.00 is required of all dental hygiene applicants who are accepted 
for admission. This deposit is applied against registration fees during 
the first quarter of attendance. If the student does not enroll, the 
deposit is not refundable. 



MATRICULATION FEE 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering on campus for the 
normal course load of fifteen hours is $115.00. Students carrying less 
than 12 credit hours on campus in a quarter will pay at the rate of 
$9.75 per quarter hour in Matriculation Fees. Students who register 
for off -campus credit courses will pay at the rate of $12.75 per credit 
hour. 



OUT OF STATE TUITION 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $180.00 per quarter in 
addition to all regular fees. Students carrying less than 12 credit 
hours in a quarter who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia 
will pay at the rate of $14.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in 
addition to all regular fees. Students who register for off-campus 
credit courses will pay at the rate of $14.00 per quarter hour 
Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 



STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $12.50 per quarter for all 
students enrolled in the undergraduate program and the graduate 
program, if enrolled for six hours or more. 



HEALTH/SERVICE FEE 

There will be a Health/Service Fee of $2.50 per quarter for all 
students enrolled in the undergraduate program. Students enrolled in 



53 



the graduate program will pay this fee, if enrolled for six hours or 
more. 



ATHLETIC FEE 

There will be an Athletic Fee of $5.00 per quarter for all students 
enrolled in the undergraduate and the graduate program. 



APPLIED MUSIC FEES 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five minute 
private lessons per week. A special fee of $31.00 for one twenty-five 
minute lesson or $62.00 for two lessons is charged quarterly to 
students not admitted to a music degree program and to music 
majors not enrolled for ten or more quarter hours of credit. This fee 
is refundable only when the student has not met his first lesson. 



LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students 
registering on the date listed in the catalog as the date on which 
classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations 
completed on the date listed in the catalog as the ''last day to register 
for credit." This fee is not refundable. 



CHANGE OF SCHEDULE FEE 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made if 
the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 



GRADUATION FEE 

A Graduation Fee of $10.00 will be collected from each candidate 
for Graduation. 



TRANSCRIPT FEE 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 



54 



SUMMARY OF FEES 

Matriculation, per quarter $115.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 12.50 

Health/Service, per quarter 2.50 

Athletic, per quarter 5.00 

TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS $135.00 

Out of State Tuition, per quarter $180.00 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $315.00 

Matriculation, Part-time Students, per quarter hour $ 9.75 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-time Students, per quarter hour 

(in addition to Matriculation Fee) $ 14.00 



PRIVILEGE FEES 

Application Fee $10.00 

Late Registration— Maximum 5.00 

Graduation Fee 10.00 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 

Applied Music Fee 31.00/62.00 

Dental Hygiene Deposit 50.00 



REFUNDS 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students 
dropping a course. Privilege fees are not refundable. Students who 
formally withdraw on the date of scheduled registration or during 
one week following the scheduled registration date are entitled to a 
refund of 80% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
formally withdraw during the period between one and two weeks 
after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 60% 
of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw 
between two and three weeks after the scheduled registration date 
are entitled to a refund of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who formally withdraw during the period between three 
and four weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a 
refund of 20% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
withdraw after a period of four weeks has elapsed from the 
scheduled registration date will be entitled to no refund of any part 
of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change at the End of any Quarter. 

55 



Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due to the 
college will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and 
will not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter 
until the delinquency has been removed. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of 
registration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is 
drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled and the student 
may re-register only on payment of a $5.00 service charge. 



SHORT COURSES 

Fees are announced for each quarter when the course is scheduled 
by the College. No refund can be made for withdrawal from a short 
course. 




56 



V. FINANCIAL AIDS 



FINANCIAL AIDS 

A college education for qualified students, regardless of their 
economic circumstances, is the guiding principle behind the program 
of student financial aid at Armstrong State College. By offering 
scholarships, short-term and long-term loans, grants, student employ- 
ment, and student assistantships, the College tries to provide the 
necessary financial assistance to students, who, without such aid, 
would be unable to attend college. 

In selecting a financial aid recipient, consideration is given to the 
applicant's record of achievement and potential for success as well as 
to his financial needs. Although a few gift scholarships specify high 
academic standards as an eligibility requirement, most scholarships 
and other types of financial aid set forth the following general 
criteria: 

(a) an applicant must be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a 
full-time student; 

(b) an applicant must maintain good academic standing as he 
progresses normally toward a degree goal; 

(c) an applicant must have a need for financial assistance. 

Some aid programs specify other criteria, such as place of 
residence, field of study, type of employment, etc. 

Armstrong State College utilizes the College Scholarship Service 
which evaluates the Parents' Confidential Statements of students 
who wish to be considered for financial assistance. A student may 
obtain the Parents' Confidential Statement form from his local high 
school counselor, from the Financial Aid Office at the College, or 
from the College Scholarship Service, P.O. Box 176, Princeton, New 
Jersey. In completing section two of the PCS, use the Armstrong 
code number 5012. Application forms for financial aid are available 
at the College. A student making an initial request for financial aid or 
a student who is requesting renewal of financial aid must file both of 
these forms as early as possible, preferably by April 1. 



57 



FINANCIAL AID PLANNING AND 
PRIORITY SCHEDULE 

October-January: Prospective students should request information 
and application forms from the Financial Aid 
Office, Armstrong State College, Savannah, 
Georgia 31406. 



February -March : 



New and renewal applications for prospective 
and currently enrolled students should be sub- 
mitted to the Financial Aid Office for the next 
academic year. Parents' Confidential Statements 
should be submitted to the College Scholarship 
Service, P.O. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey, 
designating Armstrong State College as one of 
the recipients of the Financial Need Analysis 
Report. New applicants for admission to the 
College should also take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test during this period and request that scores 
be sent to the Office of Admissions at Arm- 
strong State College. 



Meeting the following priority deadlines assures the student 
applying for financial aid that his application will be considered early 
for the award of whatever financial aid is available. 



April: 



April 15: 



September 1: 



June-September: 



Priority deadline for submission of the Parents' 
Confidential Statement by all applicants (both 
new and renewal applicants). 

Priority deadline for submission of applications 
for financial aid (both new and renewal applica- 
tions). Also priority deadline to apply for 
admission to Armstrong State College through 
the Office of Admissions. 

Final deadline for the submission of all papers 
necessary for the award of financial aid. 

Candidates notified of actions taken on their 
financial aid applications. 



Most financial aid awards are for the entire academic year, with 
payments made to the student in equal quarterly installments. A 
student may, however, apply and be considered for financial aid 
during the academic year if funds are available. 



58 



The Director of Financial Aid will be able to consider a student's 
request for financial assistance only when the application is complete 
and the College has received the information specified above. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Many of the scholarships available to students are administered by 
the College; others are approved for students by outside agencies 
upon recommendation of the College Director of Financial Aid; still 
others are administered directly by non-institutional organizations. 

REGENTS' SCHOLARSHIPS are available for residents of Georgia 
who rank, or who are predicted to rank, in the upper 25% of their 
class and who have financial need. The amount of each scholarship 
to be awarded (up to a maximum of $750.00 per year) is 
determined by the Director of Financial Aid. Recipients must 
agree to reside and work in the state of Georgia one year for each 
$1,000.00 received under this program. 

OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS include: 

American Association of University Women 

American Business Women-Azalea Chapter 

American Business Women-Historic Savannah Chapter 

American Business Women-Rebel Chapter 

American Dental Hygienists Association 

Anthony Porter Scholarships (for Savannah High graduates) 

Armstrong State College Athletic Association 

Harry M. Carter Scholarships (for insurance and underwriters) 

Chatham Education Association Scholarship 

Cobb County Dental Society Scholarship 

Elks Aidmore Auxiliary Nurses Scholarship 

Fraternal Order of Police (4) 

Great Dane Trailer Employees' Scholarships (4) 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Academic Scholarships (2) 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Athletic Scholarships (4) 

Jaycettes Scholarships 

Kiwanis Athletic Scholarship Award 

Kiwanis Academic Scholarship Award (8 — to freshmen only) 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarships (10) 

Metropolitan Kiwanis Club of Savannah Scholarship 

National Association of Social Workers 

National Secretaries Scholarship 

Porter G. Pierpont Rotary Education Funds (4) 

Propeller Club International Scholarship 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 



59 



Savannah Women's Club Scholarships (2) 
Scholarship Trust Fund Awards (30) 



STATE FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS 

In addition to the Regents' Scholarships mentioned above, the 
state of Georgia has established other financial aid programs which 
are available to residents of Georgia. 

THE GEORGIA STATE SCHOLARSHIP COMMISSION provides 
financial assistance for residents of Georgia who are pursuing a 
course of study leading to a degree in certain professional and 
technical areas (Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical Technology, 
Mental Health, etc.). Students must be enrolled or accepted for 
enrollment in a program in a particular field, must have financial 
need, and must agree to repay the scholarship award by practicing 
the profession in Georgia one year for each year the scholarship is 
financed. Award amounts (up to a maximum of $1,000.00 per 
academic year) are based upon need and upon the full-time or 
part-time status of students. 

GEORGIA HIGHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE CORPORATION 
LOANS are guaranteed educational loans provided for Georgia 
residents in attendance at Armstrong State College or any 
approved institution of higher education in Georgia or elsewhere. 
Applications are reviewed and approved by the Director of 
Financial Aid. The lending institution, with the approval of the 
Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corporation, makes the loans 
directly to the student. 

A full-time undergraduate student may borrow up to $1,200.00 
for a three-quarter academic year; a graduate student may borrow 
up to $1,500.00. Loans are also available to half-time students. 

In the tenth month following graduation from college or 
withdrawal from college, student borrowers must begin to repay 
their loans at $30.00 per month at the rate of 7% per annum. 

THE GEORGIA VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM 
provides financial assistance for the applicant who possesses an 
impairment which would prove to be a vocational handicap. The 
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation may pay the cost of tuition, 
books, and fees. Students who think that they may qualify under 
this program should contact one of the area Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion Centers located throughout the state. The Savannah Center is 
located at 420 Mall Boulevard. Applicants sponsored by Vocation- 



60 



al Rehabilitation or other community agencies must apply at least 
6 (six) weeks before the beginning of any quarter to insure proper 
processing of applications. 



FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS 

THE FEDERAL NURSING STUDENT LOAN AND SCHOLARSHIP 
PROGRAM is available to students who are enrolled or accepted 
for enrollment in the Nursing program as full-time students. 
Depending upon financial need, a student may be awarded up to 
$1,500.00 per academic year. Loans are repayable over a ten-year 
period which begins 12 months after the individual ceases to be a 
full-time nursing student. Interest begins to accrue at the start of 
the repayment period at a rate of 3% per annum. Fifty percent of 
the loan may be cancelled by working full-time as a professional 
nurse in any public or non-profit private institution or agency at 
the rate of 10% for each complete year of employment. 

THE LAW ENFORCEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM provides 
grants to cover tuition and fees for law enforcement officers who 
are employed full-time and who attend Armstrong State College as 
part-time students. The program also provides loans to cover direct 
educational costs for students enrolled full-time in academic 
programs leading to degrees in areas directly related to law 
enforcement. Students should apply for loans and/or grants each 
quarter that financial aid is desired. Upon graduation from college, 
borrowers may cancel their obligations at the rate of 25% for each 
year they are employed full-time as law enforcement officers in a 
police, correction, or court agency. 

OTHER FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS of financial aid, such 
as Educational Opportunity Grants, National Direct Student 
Loans, College Work Study funds, and Basic Opportunity Grants, 
may be available. For further information on these programs and 
the availability of funds, contact the Office of Financial Aid. 



OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID AT 
ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

INSTITUTIONAL SHORT-TERM LOANS are available in cases of 
emergencies for students who are enrolled full-time. These loans are 
made on a first-come first-served basis at an interest rate of 3%. 
Short-term loan applications should be submitted at least two 
weeks before the loan is needed. Loans must be repaid by the end 
of the quarter during which they are made. Short-term loans are 
sponsored through the following funds: 

61 



John Bravo Memorial Fund 

Kiwanis Club of Savannah Memorial Fund 

The Rho Beta Chapter Loan Fund 

The Exchangette Woman's Club of Savannah 

Rensing Short-Term Loan Fund 

Senior Class Loan Fund 

Sigma Kappa Sorority 

Union Camp Veterans' Short Term Loan Fund 

THE BARNEY MINKOFF PADEREWSKI MEMORIAL FUND 

makes available to Georgia students in the Dental Hygiene 
programs loans up to $500.00 per year, interest free. Students 
must have a financial need and maintain outstanding academic 
performances as they progress normally in their studies. Repay- 
ment begins six months after graduation or withdrawal from 
college, with a minimum payment of $50.00 per month. 

THE TY COBB EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP is 

available to single residents of the state of Georgia who have 
completed the freshman year of college with high academic 
standing (at least 3.3 GPA). Further information may be obtained 
from: The Ty Cobb Foundation, 244 Washington Street, Room 
448, Atlanta, Georgia 30334. The deadline for applications is May 
1. 

THE WILLIAM F. COOPER EDUCATIONAL FUND provides 
tuition scholarships for female students in all fields of study 
except law, theology, and medicine (nursing and medical tech- 
nology are acceptable). Apply to: Trust Department, Savannah 
Bank and Trust Company, between January 1 and May 31. 

THE INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM pro- 
vides jobs for students who do not necessarily have a financial 
need. Upon recommendation of a Department Head, the student 
should apply to the Director of Financial Aid. 

THE SAVANNAH CHAPTER, NATIONAL SECRETARIES 
ASSOCIATION provides one scholarship covering tuition, fees, 
and expenses for a female student majoring in secretarial science. 
Apply to high school counselor or typing teacher. 

THE PICKETT AND HATCHER EDUCATIONAL FUND provides 
loans at a reasonable interest rate to students in need of financial 
assistance to attend college. Apply directly to: Pickett and 
Hatcher Educational Fund, P.O. Box 1238, Columbus, Georgia. 



62 



CHATHAM ARTILLERY SCHOLARSHIPS in the amount of 
$250.00 each are available to members of the Chatham Artillery 
who are attending college full-time. Apply to the Chatham 
Artillery. 

THE SAVANNAH PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
SCHOLARSHIP provides $200.00 for a freshman student major- 
ing in pre-pharmacy at Armstrong State College (or the University 
of Georgia). Apply to: Mr. Thomas C. Crumbley, Chairman, 
Scholarship Committee, Savannah Pharmaceutical Association, c/o 
Crumbley 's Pharmacy, 1502 Waters Avenue, Savannah, Georgia. 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN BUSINESS 
CLUBS provides scholarships for college juniors and seniors 
majoring in speech correction. Apply to: National Association of 
Business Clubs, School Program Committee, P.O. Box 5127, High 
Point, North Carolina 27262. Deadline for fall and winter quarters 
is May 1 and for spring quarter, October 31. 

SENIOR YEAR SCHOLARSHIPS FOR WOMEN are made available 
each year by the United States Army for young women who have 
completed their junior years or who are first semester seniors. 
Each scholarship pays the recipient $425.00 per month during her 
senior year. Interested students should obtain further information 
from: Headquarters, United States Army Third Recruiting 
District, 1628 Virginia Avenue, College Park, Georgia 30337. 



GOVERNMENT BENEFITS 

VETERANS, DISABILITY, AND WAR ORPHANS ASSISTANCE 

Eligibility. Veterans who served on active duty for other than 
training purposes for more than 180 days, any part of which 
occurred after January 31, 1955, are eligible for financial assistance 
to attend college. Generally, sons and daughters of veterans whose 
death or total disablement was a result of service in the armed forces 
are eligible for financial benefits under the veterans program for 
educational assistance. 

How to Apply. A prospective student should first make applica- 
tion to the College and gain approval for admission from the Office 
of the Registrar/Director of Admissions. Once accepted, the veteran 
should go to the local Georgia Department of Veterans Service 
located at 21 East York Street, Savannah, Georgia and have an 
application for VA educational benefits completed. The veteran must 
carry a copy of his Record of Discharge, DD Form 214, and 



63 



supporting documentation for proof of dependency status (marriage 
certificate; divorce decree, if previously married; and birth certifi- 
cates on all dependent children). The veteran will then be given the 
forms to be presented to the Office of Veteran Affairs at Armstrong 
State College. All students receiving government benefits from the 
Veterans Administration must check with the Armstrong State 
Office of Veterans Affairs at the beginning of each quarter and file a 
form declaring the number of quarter hours he is attempting. 

Those veterans entering school under GI Bill benefits should have 
sufficient funds to finance themselves for one quarter or at least until 
payments begin from the VA (approximately six weeks). 



SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS 

The Social Security law provides monthly benefits to children 
when it has been determined that a parent on whom they were 
dependent dies or starts receiving social security retirement or 
disability benefits. Payments can be made until age 22 provided the 
child is a full-time student in an educational institution. Eligible 
students should apply to the Social Security Office which will issue 
the College a certification form. Once enrolled under social security 
benefits it is the student's responsibility to notify the Social Security 
Office if he transfers his enrollment, or if he changes his eligibility 
status when he (1) marries, (2) is adopted, or (3) earns more than 
$1500 in a calendar year. 

Students who need assistance in the area of government benefits 
should contact the Counselor in the Office of Veterans Affairs. 




64 



VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Academic advisement is made available to each student at 
Armstrong State College. The Dean of the College gives overall 
direction to the advisement program, with the appropriate Depart- 
ment Head coordinating advisement activities within the various 
departments. The student is expected to seek advisement from the 
department in which he is taking a major. The advisor maintains a 
record of his advisees' academic progress from quarter to quarter. 
The student who does not take advantage of the academic 
advisement program at the College should be reminded that he is 
responsible for fulfilling the requirements of his degree program and 
must be extremely careful to observe all regulations for admission to 
courses, such as the requirement of prerequisite courses, sometimes 
with a specified grade. Credit for a course is invalid unless all 
prerequisite requirements are observed. 

During orientation and before registration, all new students, both 
freshman and transfer students, will meet with faculty advisors. The 
faculty advisors will guide them at this time in mapping out a 
schedule for the fall quarter. The proper time for meeting with 
faculty advisors from that point on is during the pre-advisement 
periods each quarter listed in the college calendar. All faculty 
advisors, however, will be happy to give academic counseling at any 
time during a given quarter, if students need to talk with them. 

During the six quarters of his junior and senior years, the student 
must have his course selection approved in writing each quarter 
before registration by an advisor from the department in which he is 
majoring. During these last two years, the advisor will keep a record 
of the courses the student takes and the grades he makes, and, during 
the fall quarter of his senior year, the advisor will signify to the 
Registrar that the student has completed all requirements for 
graduation in his major program up to that time, and is, therefore, 
recommended for graduation upon his completion of the remaining 
requirements in his degree program. 



RELATING TO DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of 
the degree program which he has chosen, in accordance with 
the regulations of the college catalogue. 



65 



2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted 
only with the written approval of the Dean of the College, 
upon the recommendation of the department head. 

3. A student will graduate under the catalogue in effect at the 
time of his admission to the college. However, after an 
absence from Armstrong State College of two or more 
consecutive years, a student must meet the requirements of 
the catalogue in effect at the time of his return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may consist of courses taken by correspondence, 
extension, or examination. No correspondence courses may 
be used to meet the requirements in the major field or related 
fields for the Bachelor's degree or in English composition or 
foreign language. No correspondence courses may be taken 
while a student is enrolled, without prior approval of the 
Dean of the College and the head of the department in which 
the student is majoring. 

5. By state law, one of the requirements for a diploma or 
certificate from schools supported by the state of Georgia is a 
demonstration of proficiency in United States history and 
government and in Georgia history and government. A 
student at Armstrong State College may demonstrate such 
proficiency by: 

(1) Examinations- 
Students may take either the relevant CLEP, SAT Achieve- 
ment, or Advanced Placement test (making their own arrange- 
ments). Dates for the CLEP examinations are listed in the 
college calendar as printed in the Bulletin. 

(2) Credit in the following— 

for U.S. and Georgia Constitution: Political Science 113 

for U. S. and Georgia History: History 251 or 252 or any 

upper division course in U. S. History. 

6. To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a student must earn 
at Armstrong the last 45 quarter hours of credit applicable 
toward the degree, and he must complete successfully at 
Armstrong at least half of the courses required in his major 
field of study. When circumstances warrant his doing so, the 
Dean of the College may permit a student to complete up to 
ten of the last 45 quarter hours of credit at another college. 
(A request for permission to complete more than ten of these 
last 45 hours elsewhere will be referred to the Committee on 
Academic Standing.) 



66 



7. For graduation the student must earn an over-all average of 
2.0 or better considering work taken at all colleges, computed 
in such manner that a course will be counted only once, 
regardless of the number of times that it has been repeated. 
The grade earned in the last attempt will determine the 
number of honor points assigned for graduation. Additionally, 
the student must earn a grade point average of 2.0 or better 
on each of the following: 

a. all work at Armstrong 

b. all courses in the major field. 

(For regulations on grade point average governing probation 
and dismissal, see page 71.) 

8. To qualify for a second baccalaureate degree, a candidate 
must earn at Armstrong at least 45 additional hours of credit 
and, of course, meet all qualitative requirements for the 
degree. 

9. Before a degree will be conferred upon a student by 
Armstrong State College, he must pay all fees and must notify 
the Registrar in writing at least by the end of the preceding 
Fall Quarter of his intention to graduate. A candidate for a 
degree, unless excused in writing by the President, Dean of 
the College, or Dean of Student Affairs, must attend the 
graduation exercises at which a degree is to be conferred upon 
him. 

10. Each student must successfully complete the University 
System Rising Junior English Examination as a requirement 
for graduation. See page 73 of this Bulletin. 



COURSE AND STUDY LOAD 

The normal course load for full-time students is 15-18 quarter 
hours (and a course in physical education during the freshman and 
sophomore years). An average student should devote at least thirty 
hours each week, in addition, to course preparation. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is registered for 12 or 
more quarter hours. A part-time student is one registered for less 
than 12 quarter hours. (The Veterans Administration and Selective 
Service regulations often require that the student be enrolled for 
more than 12 quarter hours to be classified as a full-time student.) 

The maximum course load for a student who works full-time is 11 
quarter hours. A working student should plan about ten hours 
preparation per week for each 5 quarter hour course. 

67 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

A student who has earned 45 quarter hours of credit will be 
classified as a sophomore; 90 quarter hours of credit, as a junior; 135 
quarter hours of credit, as a senior. 



PERMISSION FOR OVERLOAD OR COURSES 
AT ANOTHER COLLEGE 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be 
granted by the Registrar to a student 

a) with an average grade of "B" for the preceding quarter, or 

b) in an engineering program, or 

c) requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters prior to 
graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter 
hours in any one quarter. 

A student who is on academic probation will not be permitted to 
register for more than 18 quarter hours in any one quarter. 

Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the Dean of 
the College. 

A student enrolled at Armstrong who at the same time takes 
courses for credit at another college may not transfer such credit to 
Armstrong, unless he has obtained in advance the written permission 
of the Dean of Armstrong State College to register for those courses. 



REPORTS AND GRADES 

The faculty feels that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, grade reports, warn- 
ings of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to 
parents or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead, the 
students themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact 
their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Grade reports 
are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of unsatisfactory 
grades are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has 
access to an adviser; in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are 
available to help any student seeking assistance. 



68 



Reports are based on the following system of grading. 

GRADE HONOR POINTS 

A 4.0 

B 3.0 

C 2.0 

D 1.0 

F 

I Incomplete 

W Withdrew with no grade 

NC No credit 

A student who receives an "I" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of 
the course. An "I" grade which has not been removed by the middle 
of the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". 

HONORS 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten quarter hours of 
course work who earn an honor point average of at least 3.3 will be 
placed on the Dean's List, published quarterly. Only course work 
taken at Armstrong will be used in the computation of Dean's List 
honors. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point 
average of 3.2 through 3.499 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 3.5 through 3.799 will be graduated magna cum 
laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 3.8 through 4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other accredited institutions 
will be considered in computing honors for graduation. 

ATTENDANCE 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect 
of a student's attendance on his grades in a course are left entirely to 
the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, 
discussed, or lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all 
assigned reading; he is also responsible for turning in on time all 
assignments and tests, including recitation and unannounced quizzes. 

69 



The best way to meet these responsibilities is to attend classes 
regularly. An instructor may drop a student from any class with a 
grade of "F" if he thinks that excessive absence prevents that student 
from satisfactorily fulfilling his responsibilities. If such excessive 
absence is the result of prolonged illness, death in the family, college 
business, or religious holidays, the withdrawal grade will be either 
"W" or "F" depending on the student's status at the time he was 
dropped. Instructors will be responsible for informing each of his 
classes at its first meeting what constitutes excessive absence in that 
particular class. Each student is responsible for knowing the 
attendance regulation in his class and for complying with it. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

All students who are enrolled for ten quarter hours or more on the 
day schedule are required to complete six hours of physical 
education, of which P.E. 117 (Basic Health) and P.E. 103 (Elemen- 
tary Swimming) or P.E. 108 (Intermediate Swimming) are required. 
During his freshman year, a student should take P.E. 117 and 103 or 
108. During their sophomore year, students may elect any three 
Physical Education activity courses with the last two numbers being 
01 to 09. 

Any student who holds a valid senior life saving certificate and/or 
a valid water safety instructor certificate and /or passes the Arm- 
strong swimming test may be exempted from the required swimming 
course (P.E. 103 or 108). 

A student graduating with an Associate in Arts Degree in less than 
six quarters must take one course in each quarter of his freshman and 
sophomore years. 

Students enrolled in the Associate in Arts Degree program in 
nursing are required to complete three physical education courses. 

A student who has completed at least six months of military 
service is required to take only four hours in physical education, 
which he may choose from all scheduled offerings, during his 
freshman and sophomore years. 

Physical education is not required of anyone who is beyond the 
age of 25 at the time of initial matriculation, or of anyone enrolled 
primarily in evening classes. 

The department requires all students to make up excused 
absences; unexcused absences lower the final grade. 



70 



ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

A student who maintains or exceeds the gradepoint average 
indicated below for the quarter hours attempted will be considered 
in good standing. A student failing to maintain the minimum 
gradepoint average for quarter hours attempted will be placed on 
academic probation. 

Quarter Hours Attempted at Required Cumulative 

Armstrong and Elsewhere GPA 

0-15 1.3 

16-30 1.4 

31-45 1.5 

46-60 1.6 

61-75 1.7 

76-90 1.8 

91-105 1.9 

106-120 1.9 

121-135 and over 2.0 

A student on academic probation who raises his cumulative 
gradepoint average during the probationary quarter to equal or to 
exceed the appropriate figure in the foregoing table will be removed 
from academic probation. One who fails to achieve the required 
cumulative average, but who does earn an average of at least 2.0 
during the probationary quarter, will be continued on probation for 
the next quarter of attendance. The College places no restrictions on 
the extracurricular activities of students who are placed on academic 
probation. Any student on academic probation should plan both his 
curricular and extracurricular activities with care, consulting with his 
advisor in so doing. 

The student on academic probation who does not achieve the 
required cumulative average or who does not earn an average of at 
least 2.0 for the quarter in which he is on probation will be dismissed 
from the college for one quarter. A third such academic dismissal will 
be final. 

A student re-entering the college after academic dismissal is placed 
on probation and must meet the requirement listed above. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal by letter to 
the President, who will refer the appeal to the Committee on 
Academic Standing. Such a letter of appeal should state the nature of 
any extenuating circumstances relating to the academic deficiency; 
the letter should be received by the President no later than 9 a.m. on 



71 



registration day. No action will be taken on appeals received later 
than 12:00 noon on the day following registration day. 



REPEATING COURSES 

Any course for which a grade of "D" or "F" has been recorded 
may be repeated with the last grade earned to be counted in 
academic averages. A student who repeats any such courses should 
complete a "Notice of Course Repetition' 'form available in the 
Registrar's Office. 



DROPPING COURSES 

A student desiring to drop a course after the quarter has begun 
must obtain a Drop-Add Notice in the Office of the Registrar. The 
notice must be signed by the instructor of the course being dropped 
and returned by the student to the Registrar's Office. 

A student who drops a course not more than seven class days after 
the course begins will receive no grade for the course. A student who 
drops a course after the first seven class days and before the last eight 
class days, will receive a grade of "W" or "F" depending on his status 
in the course. A student may not voluntarily drop a course during 
the last eight class days of a quarter. 



WITHDRAWING FROM COLLEGE 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw from college must 
begin the process in the Office of Student Affairs. A formal 
withdrawal is required to insure that the student is eligible to return 
to Armstrong State College at a future date. Any refund to which a 
student is entitled will be considered on the basis of the date which 
appears on the withdrawal form. 



AUDITING 

A regular student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving 
credit must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he 
registers for the course. During the registration process the student 
should request a special "audit" course card. (Policy for some 
courses forbids "auditing.") An "auditor" cannot change to regular 
credit status after the first week of class. A student may not change 
from credit status to audit status after the first seven class meetings. 
A student who registers for a course as an "auditor" receives no 



72 



credit, "N.C.", on his transcript. Regular schedules of fees apply to 
auditors. 



RISING JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAMINATION 

University System policy requires that all students successfully 
complete tests of writing skills and reading comprehension as a 
requirement for graduation. A student will be notified to take the 
tests in the quarter immediately following that in which he 
completes his 55th quarter hour. In order to insure adequate 
preparation for the tests, freshmen are expected to begin the 
sequence of required English composition courses no later than their 
second quarter of attendance. 

Transfer students who have completed more than 55 quarter hours 
and who have not successfully completed the tests are responsible for 
meeting this requirement at the earliest possible opportunity. For 
test dates, see the Academic Calendar published in this Bulletin. 
Information on policies governing the repetition of the Rising Junior 
English Examination is available in the Office of Student Affairs. 

Any student who neglects to take the Rising Junior English 
Examination in the appropriate quarter will be prohibited from 
registering at the College for subsequent quarters. 



HONOR CODE 

The Honor Code at Armstrong State College is dedicated to the 
proposition that the protection of the grading system is in the 
interest of the student community. The Honor Council is an 
institutional means to assure that the student community shall have 
primary disposition of infractions of the Honor Code and that 
students accused of such infractions shall enjoy those procedural 
guarantees traditionally considered essential to a fair and impartial 
hearing, the foremost of which is the presumption of innocence until 
guilt be established beyond a reasonable doubt. 

I. Responsibilities of Students: 

All students must agree to abide by the rules of the Honor 
Code. A student shall not be accepted at Armstrong State 
College unless he signs the following statement at the time of 
his first registration: "I have read the Honor Code of Armstrong 
State College. I understand the Code and agree that as a student 
at Armstrong, I must comply with these requirements." This 
statement shall be printed on the application for admission to 

73 



the college and must be signed by the student. The Honor Code 
shall be printed in the official Bulletin and the Student 
Handbook. 

It will be the responsibility of the Honor Council or its 
designated representative to conduct an orientation program at 
the beginning of each quarter for all newly entering students to 
explain fully the Honor Code and to allow full discussion of its 
requirements. 

Any student desiring assistance with any matter related to the 
Honor Code is invited to seek assistance in the Office of 
Student Affairs. 

II. Violations of the Honor Code: 

Violations of the Honor Code may be of two kinds: (a) general 
and (b) those related to the peculiarities of specific course- 
related problems and to the understanding of individual 
instructors. Any instructor whose conception of cheating would 
tend to enlarge or contract the general regulations defining 
cheating must explicitly notify the affected students of the 
qualifications to the general regulations which he wishes to 
stipulate. The following will be considered general violations of 
the Honor Code: 

1. Giving or receiving any unauthorized help on any assign- 
ment, test or paper. The meaning of "unauthorized help" 
shall be made clear by the instructor of each class. 

2. Stealing when related to cheating. 

3. Plagiarizing. 

4. Giving perjured testimony before the Honor Council. 

5. Suborning, attempting to suborn, or intimidating witnesses. 

6. Failing to report a suspected violation of the Honor Code. 

III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code: 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may come to the Office of 
Student Affairs for assistance in contacting members of the 
Honor Council. 



74 



A. Self-reporting: A student who has broken the Honor Code 
should report himself to a member of the Honor Council. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a 
violation of the Honor Code must report the matter. This 
may be done in one of two ways. 

1. He may tell the person thought to be guilty to report 
himself to a member of the Honor Council no later than 
the end of the next school day. After this designated 
time, the person who is aware of the violation must 
inform a member of the Honor Council so that the 
Honor Council may contact the accused person if he has 
not already reported himself. 

2. He may report the suspected violation directly to a 
member of the Honor Council without informing the 
accused. 

IV. The procedural rights of students accused of violations of the 
Honor Code: 

The essence of the procedural rights of an accused is the right 
to a fair and impartial hearing and the right to be presumed 
innocent until proven guilty. Specific rights are as follows: 

1. Honor Council members shall examine their consciences 
carefully to determine whether they can, in good 
conscience, serve on a panel hearing a particular case, and, in 
the event that there is any doubt whatsoever, such members 
will excuse themselves from duty on the specific panel in 
question. 

2. The accused will be notified in writing by the Honor Council 
or its designated representative of the nature and details of 
the offense with which he is charged along with the names 
of his accusers and the principal witnesses to be brought 
against him. This notification shall occur no less than three 
days prior to the date of the hearing. 

3. The accused has the right to counsel of his own choosing. 
Such counsel will not participate directly in the proceedings 
except to advise his client. It is expected that such counsel 
will be drawn from the college community. 

4. The accused and the person bringing the charges shall be 
afforded an opportunity to present witnesses and documen- 

75 



tary or other evidence. The accused and any individual 
bringing the charges shall have the right to cross examine all 
witnesses and may, where the witnesses cannot appear 
because of illness or other cause acceptable to the Council, 
present the sworn statement of the witnesses. The Council 
shall not be bound by formal rules governing the presen- 
tation of evidence, and it may consider any evidence 
presented which is of probative value in the case. 

5. The accused may not be made to bear witness against 
himself. The Council may not take the refusal of accused to 
testify as evidence of guilt, but this proviso does not give the 
accused immunity from a hearing or from recommendations 
reached in a hearing simply because the accused does not 
testify. 

6. The accused shall have access to a complete audiotape of the 
hearing and to the record prepared by the secretary. 

7. The substantive facts of a case may be re-opened for 
consideration upon initiation of the accused acting through 
normal appeal channels. The accused shall not be put in 
double jeopardy. 

8. All witnesses will be sequestered from the hearing room 
during the course of a hearing. Witnesses may not discuss a 
pending case. 

9. By prior agreement, the accused will be allowed such 
observers of the hearing as may be commensurate with the 
space available. Otherwise, in the interests of the right of 
privacy of the accused, hearings will be private, except that 
the College may also have observers additional to the 
advisors to the Honor Council. 

V. Composition and Formation of the Honor Council and The 
Honor Code Commission: 

The Honor Council will be composed of twelve students; three 
of whom shall be designated by the Honor Code Commission as 
alternates who will serve in the place of regular members unable 
to serve at a given hearing. 

A. Honor Council members will be selected by an Honor Code 
Commission which shall consist of the President, Vice- 
President and Secretary of the Student Body and the 
current President and Secretary of the Honor Council 



76 



together with three faculty members appointed by the 
President of the College. In order to conduct business, the 
Commission must have present at least three of its five 
student members, one of which must be an Honor Council 
officer, and two of its three faculty members. 

B. The Commission will give due consideration to equitable 
apportionment of Council members on the basis of 
academic class, race, and sex. Students on academic 
probation may not serve. All appointments will be issued 
and accepted in writing. Appointments will be made during 
Spring Quarter in time for the Honor Council to assume its 
duties which shall begin on May 1. Appointments will be 
made as needed to keep the Honor Council staffed to do 
business on a reasonably prompt basis. These appointments 
may constitute permanent or temporary replacements as the 
Honor Code Commission deems necessary. 

C. The Honor Council will elect a President and a Secretary 
from its membership. The President will preside at all 
hearings. The Secretary will maintain written notes on all 
proceedings and autiotape records of all testimony, and will 
maintain exhibits or copies of exhibits of evidence which by 
their nature may reasonably be maintained in the Council 
files. 

D. Constituency of the Honor Council during the summer term 
shall include all appointed members in attendance, and 
others as shall be appointed to membership by the Honor 
Code Commission. 

VI. Procedures and Penalties Adopted by the Honor Council: 

The Honor Council shall formulate its own bylaws governing 
internal organization and procedure. Such bylaws must be 
consistent with the Honor Code. 

A. Nine members, including the President and Secretary, will 
normally hear a case. A quorum shall consist of seven and 
may hear a case. 

B. Hearings shall be called by the Council President to be held 
on a date not less than three (3) nor more than ten (10) 
class days after notice to the accused as provided in Section 
IV-2. Exceptions to these time requirements may be 
granted. 



77 



C. A two-thirds majority secret ballot vote is required to reach 
a finding of guilty. All other questions may be settled by a 
simple majority vote. 

D. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the Council shall make a 
recommendation to the Dean of the College as to the 
administrative action it deems appropriate within the 
following limitations: 

1. A minimum penalty shall be loss of assignment or test 
credit for the assignment or test for violations involving 
cheating as specified in Section II, subsections 1, 2 and 
3. Additional penalties such as reprimands, suspension, 
or others may be recommended for any aspects of 
Section II. 

2. Maximum penalty for a first offense of any type shall be 
suspension for a full calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second offense may be 
suspension for three years. 

E. Immediately following a hearing, the accused will be 
informed of the Council's finding, and its recommendation 
to the Dean of the College. If the finding is guilty, the 
accused will be informed that the Council may re-open the 
case with the consent of the accused for good cause, within 
a three week period. 

F. The Dean of the College will inform all involved persons in 
writing of the action he has taken in view of Council 
recommendations. The Council Secretary will post public 
notice of the Dean's action by case number without 
identifying the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalties: 

Should a student have cause to question the findings of the 
Council or the action of the Dean of the College or both, he has 
the right of appeal. The channels of appeal are as follows: 

A. Council findings and /or the administrative action of the 
Dean of the College may be appealed within five days by 
writing the President of the College. Further appeal pro- 
cedures will conform to the appeal procedures of the 
College and of the Policies of the Board of Regents, 
University System of Georgia (a copy of these policies is 

78 



available in the Library; see chapter on Students, section 
on appeals, page 165, 1969 edition). 

VII. Supervision of the Honor Council: 

As an institutional means of responding to reported infractions 
of the Honor Code, the Honor Council is ultimately responsible 
to the President of the College. 

Supervision of the Honor Council will be accomplished 
ordinarily through the following individuals: 

A. Dean of Student Affairs 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, of the College 
Statutes, the Dean of Student Affairs will provide general 
supervision of the Honor Council and will provide other 
guidance or services as directed by the President of the 
College. 

B. Advisor and Associate Advisor 

1. An advisor and an associate advisor to the Honor Council 
will be appointed by the President of the College. 

2. Ordinarily, the advisor will serve in that office for one 
year only and usually will be succeeded in that position 
by the associate advisor. 

Therefore, after the initial appointments, only an 
associate advisor will ordinarily be appointed each year. 
The succession of associate to the advisor position is 
deemed to occur on the last day of the Spring Quarter. 

In the event that for some reason the advisor is unable to 
complete his term, the associate advisor shall succeed to 
the office of advisor and another associate advisor shall 
be appointed by the above procedures. If, during the 
Summer Quarter, neither advisor is on campus, a 
temporary advisor will be appointed. 

3. Duties of the Advisor and the Associate Advisor: 

It shall be the duty of the advisor to consult with the 
Council and to offer advice to the President and 
members of the Council on substantive and procedural 
questions. The advisor, or the associate advisor in the 
event the advisor is unable to attend, shall be present at 

79 



all meetings and hearings of the Council. The advisor 
may not vote nor may he participate directly in the 
conduct of hearings before the Council except through 
the President, or acting President, of the Council. The 
advisor should be governed at all times by the principle 
that a hearing before the Honor Council is primarily a 
matter of student responsibility. 

IX. Revision of the Honor Code will require confirmation by 
majority vote of those faculty and student body members 
voting. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM REGULATIONS 

Academic regulations relating to the graduate programs are 
published in the Graduate Bulletin. Further information may be 
obtained from the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at either 
Armstrong State College or Savannah State College. 




80 






VII. STUDENT SERVICES, ACTIVITIES 

The Office of Student Affairs, administered by the Dean of 
Student Affairs, is responsible for all student services and activities. 
In addition to formal classroom instruction, the College recognizes 
the need for providing programs and services which contribute to a 
well-rounded college experience. Such programs are administered by 
the Office of Student Affairs through the following individuals: 
Counselors, Director of Financial Aid, Director of Student Activities, 
and the Campus Nurse. 



COUNSELING 

Counselors are available in the Office of Student Affairs to assist 
students in making successful and realistic decisions and in choosing 
appropriate routes for attaining selected goals. The counseling 
process focuses on increasing the student's self-understanding and 
respect for his own ability to make decisions that will affect his life. 
All discussions are confidential in nature. 

Counselors can assist students in clarifying educational and 
vocational objectives, in developing effective study skills and habits, 
and in dealing with problems of social and emotional significance. 
Counseling services are available to students at no charge. 



VETERANS SERVICES 

Armstrong State College maintains a full-time Office of Veterans 
Affairs located in the Administration Building. The office employs a 
number of student/veterans to assist in meeting the needs of the 
veteran student body of Armstrong. A professional counselor is 
available to assist veterans with admission procedures, academic 
advisement, career development, and social and emotional adjust- 
ment to college. The office also assists veterans in finding part-time 
employment and housing. A short term loan program assists veterans 
with emergency loans. 



TESTING SERVICES 

The following national testing programs are administered regularly 
by members of the counseling staff: Architectural School Aptitude 
Test (ASAT), College Level Examination Program (CLEP-History 
and Government Examinations), Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test, 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Graduate School Foreign 
Language Test (GSFLT), National Teacher Examination (NTE), and 



81 



the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Information and applications for 
the Dental Admissions Test, Law School Admission Test (LSAT), 
and the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) can be obtained 
from the Office of Student Affairs. 

Counselors also have available a variety of tests to assist students 
in assessing personal, educational, or vocational needs. These tests are 
administered individually to students and the results treated con- 
fidentially. 



ORIENTATION 

The decision to enter college for further education and knowledge 
is an important point in an individual's process of self -development. 
Orientation in the fall at Armstrong State College is planned to aid 
the student in his transition to college by exposing him to the 
dynamics of successful decision-making. By using techniques that 
encourage the realization of possible outcomes and consequences, 
the student will learn to explore his possibilities with more 
understanding and confidence. 

Freshmen participating in this program will be given information 
concerning student activities programs, visit campus facilities, and 
plan their class schedules with academic advisors. 

During other quarters, an abbreviated orientation program is 
scheduled for students new to the college prior to their registration. 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 

The Placement Office, located in the Office of Student Affairs, 
offers general assistance in the planning of career directions. The 
office operates a personal resume service for all regularly enrolled 
students and alumni of the college, receives listings of full-time career 
opportunities, and arranges on-campus recruiting with business, 
governmental and educational agencies. Students who wish to make 
use of the Placement Service should contact the Placement Office at 
least one year prior to completion of studies. 

The Placement Office also provides a job listing and referral 
system for currently enrolled students who are seeking part-time, 
temporary, or vacation employment. 



82 



CONDUCT 

Every student who enrolls in a course at Armstrong State College 
commits himself, by the act of enrolling, to full compliance with the 
rules and regulations of the Honor System and Code of Conduct. The 
Honor System is outlined under "Academic Regulations" in this 
Bulletin and the Code of Conduct is published in the ARMSTRONG 
STUDENT HANDBOOK. 

Compliance with the regulations and policies of the faculty of 
Armstrong State College and the Regents of the University System of 
Georgia is assumed. To enroll is to agree to assume responsibility for 
adhering to policies and using established channels to promote 
change. Not to do so is sufficient basis for the college to terminate a 
student's enrollment. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

In addition to an outstanding academic program, Armstrong State 
College offers a complete program of extra-curricular student 
activities designed to contribute to the development of the student 
and to assist him in becoming an active and productive member of 
the community in which he lives. 

Student organizations at Armstrong State College reflect the 
natural variety of interests found in a diversified student body. 
Individuals who seek a well-rounded education will avail themselves 
of the varied opportunities afforded through the college program of 
student activities. 

A variety of clubs and organizations representing varied interests 
and activities are available to students at Armstrong State College. 
These include the following: 

Religious: 

United Christians on Campus 

Baptist Student Union 
Greeks: 

Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority 

Sigma Kappa Sorority 

Phi Mu Sorority 

Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity 

Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity 

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity 

Sigmu Nu Fraternity 



83 



Professional: 

Student Nurses Association of Georgia 

Future Secretaries Association 

Student Association of Educators 

American Junior Dental Hygienists Association 

Armstrong State College Mathematics Association 

Sigma Alpha Eta (National Speech & Hearing Association) 

American Chemical Society 
Interest: 

Glee Club 

Band 

Chess Club 

Cheerleaders 

Masquers 

Young Democrats 

Awareness Through Community Action (ATCA) 

Buccaneers 

Black American Movement 
Honorary: 

Delta Lamba Alpha (Scholastic honorary for freshman women) 

Phi Delta Theta (History) 

Pi Delta Phi (French) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Government Association is the official governing 
body of the students at Armstrong State College. It assists in 
formulating a program of student services and activities, and it strives 
to express the will of the majority of students and to provide 
experience in democratic living. 

All students are automatically members of the Student Govern- 
ment Association and are entitled to vote in SGA elections. Qualified 
students may seek positions of leadership in the Student Government 
Association by running for office during the spring quarter. 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The official student publications on campus include the Inkwell 
(the college newspaper) and the Geechee (the college annual). These 
publications are produced by students under the supervision of 
approved college advisors. Financed in part by the Student Activity 
Fund, these publications provide opportunities for students in 
creative writing, reporting, and design. 



84 



HEALTH 

Armstrong State College maintains a campus infirmary where a 
registered nurse is on duty from 8:15 a.m. until 5 p.m. Students who 
become ill or who are involved in accidents while on campus should 
not hesitate to avail themselves of this service. 

The college also makes available, on a voluntary basis, a student 
health and accident insurance policy. Information regarding the 
program may be secured in the Office of Student Affairs. 



DENTAL HYGIENE SERVICES 

The Dental Hygiene Clinic is available to students who wish to 
receive free oral examinations under the supervision of a dentist and 
registered hygienists. 



ALUMNI OFFICE 

The primary purposes of the Alumni Office are to keep former 
students informed about the college and to help them keep in touch 
with each other. Any person who at any time was matriculated as a 
regular student is eligible for membership in the Alumni Association 
and, upon payment of his dues, will receive association periodicals, 
and may vote and hold office in the Association. The Alumni Office 
assists in arranging class reunions, board meetings, and other 
functions. For further information contact the Alumni Secretary. 



HOUSING 

There is no student housing on campus. Private apartments for 
male, female, and married students, however, are available within 
walking distance of Armstrong State College. For further infor- 
mation regarding housing, please contact the Office of Student 
Affairs. 



ATHLETICS 

Armstrong State College is affiliated with the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association, College Division. The College holds member- 
ship in the South Atlantic Conference. College teams participate in 
intercollegiate competition in basketball, baseball, tennis, golf, cross 
country track events, and bowling. 



85 



INTRAMURALS 

The Student Intramural Council and Intramural Department 
provides a diversified program available to all students and faculty 
including organized competitive sports, recreational activities, and 
clubs. Any student interested in participating in these activities 
should contact the Director of Intramurals. 



CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Armstrong State College provides a variety of cultural oppor- 
tunities for its students. Lectures by eminent scholars in the various 
academic fields and musical concerts by outstanding artists are an 
integral part of the program in general education. Student dramatic 
productions under professional direction and the student choral and 
instrumental groups have created distinguished traditions. 



ARMSTRONG SUMMER THEATRE 

The Armstrong Summer Theatre presents annually during the 
Summer Quarter a season of three plays with popular appeal, 
produced by a company of amateur talents (actors and technicians) 
from the college community. Participants may receive college credit 
(see course listing under Department of Languages and Literature). 




86 






VIM. DEGREE PROGRAMS 



UNIVERSITY SYSTEM CORE CURRICULUM 

Each unit in the University System of Georgia requires as a Core 
Curriculum for all baccalaureate degree programs the following 
minimum number of quarter hours in the major areas of study: 

Areas of Study Minimum Quarter 

Hours Required 

I. Humanities, including, but not limited to grammar 

and composition and literature 20 

II. Mathematics and the natural sciences, including, 
but not limited to, mathematics and a 10-hour 
sequence of laboratory courses in the biological 
or physical sciences 20 

III. Social Sciences, including, but not limited to, 

history and American Government 20 

IV. Courses appropriate to the major field of the 

individual student 30 

TOTAL . . .90 

In addition to the University System Core Curriculum requirements 
as outlined above, Armstrong State College requires six quarter hours 
in physical education as part of all baccalaureate degree programs. 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE CORE CURRICULUM 

The student in any baccalaureate degree program at Armstrong 
State College must complete the following specific Core Curriculum 
requirements. Consult the relevant departmental section for a 
complete statement of degree requirements for a specific program. 

Quarter Hours 
Area I. Humanities 20 

English 121, 122, and 221 
One of the following courses: 

Art 200, Art 290, Art 291, Music 200, 

Philosophy 201, English 222 



87 



Quarter Hours 

Area II. Mathematics and the Natural Sciences 20 

One of the following course sequences: 
Mathematics 101, 103 
Mathematics 101, 195 
Mathematics 101, 220 
Mathematics 101, 290 

One of the following course sequences: 
Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

Area III. Social Sciences 20 

History 114*, 115* 
Political Science 113* 
One course selected from: 

Psychology 101, Sociology 201, Anthropology 201, 

Economics 201 

Area IV. Courses Appropriate to the Major Field 30 

Biology: Qtr. Hrs. 

Foreign Language 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 128, 129 10 

Botany 203 5 

Zoology 204 5 

Business Administration: Qtr. Hrs. 

B. A. 211, 212 10 

Economics 201, 202 10 

Mathematics 220 5 

B. A. 200 or 205 or Computer Science 110 5 

Business Education: Qtr. Hrs. 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Speech 228 5 

B. A. 211, 212 10 

Economics 202 5 

** Chemistry: Qtr. Hrs. 

Physics 213 5 

Chemistry 128, 129, 281 15 

Mathematics 104, 201 10 

Computer Science: Qtr. Hrs. 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202, 220 20 

Computer Science 110, 241 10 

88 



Criminal Justice: Qtr. Hrs. 

History 251* or 252* 5 

C. J. 100, 103, 201, 205 20 

Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 5 

Dental Hygiene Education: 

Associate degree required for admission to upper two-year 
curriculum. 

Economics: Qtr. Hrs. 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 or 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202 15 

Mathematics 220 5 

Economics 201, 202 10 

Elementary Education: Qtr. Hrs. 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Fifteen quarter hours to be selected from: 

Geography 111; Chemistry, Physics, or 

Physical Science (100-200 level) 15 

Speech 228 5 

English: Qtr. Hrs. 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103, 201 20 

Electives from: Art 200, 290, 291 

Music 200; Philosophy 201; English 222 10 

French: Qtr. Hrs. 

French 101, 102, 103, 201 20 

Electives from: Art 200, 290, 291; 

Music 200; Philosophy 201 10 

History: Qtr. Hrs. 

Foreign Language 101, 102 10 

History 251, 252* 10 

Electives to be chosen from: 
Anthropology 201 

Criminal Justice 300; Economics 201, Geography 111, 
Mathematics 220, Political Science 200, Psychology 101, 
Sociology 201, Social Work 250 10 

Mathematics (B.S. degree): Qtr. Hrs. 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202, 203 20 

Foreign Language 101, 102 10 

Mathematics (B.S.Ed, degree): Qtr. Hrs. 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202 15 

Speech 228 5 

Medical Technology: Qtr. Hrs. 

Physics 211, 212, 213 15 

Chemistry 128, 129, 281 15 



89 



**Music: Qtr. Hrs. 

Music Theory 111, 112, 113, 211, 212, 213 18 

Applied Music 140, 141, 142, 240 8 

Music 250 (Ensemble) 4 

Music Education: Qtr. Hrs. 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Elective from: Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200 5 

Fifteen quarter hours to be selected from: 

Music Theory 111, 112, 113, 211, 212, 213; 

Applied Music 140, 141, 142, 240 15 

Nursing: Qtr. Hrs. 

Zoology 208, 209 10 

Biology 210 5 

Sociology 201 5 

Nursing 101, 102 16 

Physical Education: Qtr. Hrs. 

Speech 228 5 

Education 203 5 

P.E. 218 5 

P.E. 228, 229 10 

Psychology 101 5 

Political Science: Qtr. Hrs. 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103, 201 20 

History 251* or 252* 5 

Elective to be chosen from: 

Anthropology 201, Criminal Justice 300, Economics 201, 

Geography 111, History 251 or 252, Psychology 101, 

Sociology 201, Social Work 250 5 

^Psychology: *Qtr. Hrs. 

Mathematics 220 5 

Additional Lab Science Sequence 10 

Electives from: Biology 101, 102; Anthropology 201; 

Sociology 201; Philosophy 201 10 

Psychology 101 5 

Social Work: Qtr. Hrs. 
Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 or Philosophy 201, Anthro- 
pology 201 and Social Science elective (100-200 level) 15 

Sociology 201 5 

History 252* 5 

Social Work 250 5 

Speech Correction: Qtr. Hrs. 

Physical Science 121 5 

Education 203 5 

Mental Health Work 102 5 

Special Education 205, 225, 230 15 

90 



Quarter Hours 

Area V. Physical Education Requirements (All Programs) 6 

P.E. 103 and P.E. 117 

Three of the following courses: 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

TOTAL . . .96 

The student should complete all Core Curriculum requirements 
during his freshman and sophomore years. ALL STUDENTS ARE 
REMINDED THAT SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY SYSTEM RISING JUNIOR ENGLISH EXAMINATION 
IS A REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION FROM ARMSTRONG 
STATE COLLEGE. 

*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section in this Bulletin, or request further information 
from the Head of the Department of History and Political Science. 

**In addition, a foreign language sequence is recommended. 



DIAGNOSTIC TESTS IN ENGLISH AND 
MATHEMATICS 

The College reserves the right to place entering students in 
appropriate English and Mathematics courses. Diagnostic tests are 
administered for this purpose. Each student must take the diagnostic 
test in mathematics before he may register for Mathematics 101 and 
must take the diagnostic test in English before he may register for 
English 191, 110, or 121. The dates scheduled for the administration 
of these diagnostic tests are listed in the College Calendar. 



STATE REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY AND 
GOVERNMENT 

By state law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate 
from a school supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate 
proficiency in United States History and Government and in Georgia 
History and Government. A student at Armstrong State College may 
demonstrate such proficiency by successfully completing History 
251 or 252 and Political Science 113 or by successfully completing 
exemption examinations for which credit will be awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section in this Bulletin, or request further 
information from the Head of the Department of History and 
Political Science. Scheduled dates for exemption examinations are 
listed in the College Calendar. 



91 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS 
AND THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES 

Requirements for each major program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts with a major in English, French, History, Music, 
Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, or Economics, or to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology, Chemistry, or 
Mathematics are described in the appropriate departmental listing. 
For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, 
exclusive of the required physical education courses, is required for 
graduation. 

Each student in one of these major programs must complete the 
96-hour core curriculum requirement as listed above. 

The student will not be allowed to take senior division courses in 
his major field unless he has a minimum grade of "C" in all 
prerequisite courses in that field. No major program in a department 
will require more than 60 quarter hours at all levels in the major 
field; however, the department may recommend up to 70 quarter 
hours. 

For its major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 
quarter hours of specific courses or approved elective courses in 
related fields and may require language courses reaching the degree 
of proficiency specified by the department. Total requirements in 
the major and related fields may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Each B.A. or B.S. degree program will include a minimum of 15 
quarter hours of free electives. 



TEACHER EDUCATION 

All teacher education programs are approved by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and 
by the Georgia State Department of Education. Upon verification by 
the College that the student has completed successfully an approved 
program, the student applies to the State Department of Education 
for the appropriate certificate. Armstrong State College offers the 
following approved Teacher Education programs: 

Approved Programs 

Elementary Education (Grades 1-8) 

Speech Correction 

Secondary Programs (Grades 7-12) 

Business Education (Comprehensive or Bookkeeping and 
Business Management) 

92 



English 

Mathematics 

Science (Biology) 

Science (Chemistry) 

Social Studies (History) 

Social Studies (Political Science) 

Social Studies (Behavioral Sciences) 
All Levels (Grades 1-12) 

Music 

Physical Education 
All students completing teacher education programs are required 
to take both the Common Examinations and the appropriate 
Teaching Area Examination of the National Teacher Examinations. 
Students must submit the scores from these examinations or 
evidence that the examinations have been completed to the 
Department of Education before the college can verify that an 
approved program has been completed. Additional information 
about the National Teacher Examinations can be secured from the 
Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Teacher Library Service Endorsement 

This program may constitute an area of concentration for 
elementary teachers and an endorsement on the certificate for 
secondary teachers. The program is also intended to create interest in 
Jibrarianship. The courses are as follows: 

Library Science 310, 320, 410, 420 20 Q.H. 

Academic Advisement 

A student who desires to become an elementary or secondary 
school teacher should apply during the first quarter of residence to 
the Department of Education for academic advisement. He should 
follow without deviation the approved program. Upon admission to 
teacher education, students will be assigned advisors as follows: 

1. Elementary education and speech correction majors are as- 
signed an advisor in the Department of Education who will 
assist the student in planning the total program of studies. 

2. Students pursuing secondary or all level programs will be 
assigned an advisor in the Department of Education to assist 
them concerning the professional sequence courses and certifi- 
cation requirements. In addition, students will have an advisor 
in the teaching field major to approve the courses in the 
teaching field. Assignment of the teaching field advisor will be 
made by the head of the academic department offering the 
major. Each student must have his secondary teaching program 

93 



approved in advance by both advisors. Special forms for this 
purpose are to be filed with each advisor and a copy given to 
the student. 

Admission to Teacher Education 

All students must apply for admission to teacher education at 
Armstrong State College. This application will normally be filed 
during the third quarter of the sophomore year or, for transfer 
students, in the first quarter of the junior year. Application forms 
may be secured from the office of the Head of the Department of 
Education. The following criteria are used in admitting applicants to 
teacher education: 

1. Completion of at least 60 quarter hours of college credit with a 
2.50 GPA and completion of Education 203 and English 121, 
122, and 221 or their equivalents with a "C" or better. 

2. Competence in oral and written expression. 

3. Satisfactory physical and emotional health. 

4. Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching poten- 
tial. 

September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is to provide an 
opportunity for future teachers (1) to learn what teachers do at the 
beginning of a new school term, (2) to participate in experiences that 
will assist the prospective teacher with future decisions concerning 
teaching as a career, and (3) to become acquainted with the 
organization and curriculum of a particular school. 

The September Practicum occurs during the first two weeks of the 
public school term (usually in late August and early September) and 
should be scheduled during the student's junior or senior year. No 
credit is given for the September Practicum, but it is a requirement in 
all of the teaching fields in the Armstrong State College Teacher 
Education Program. 

Application for the September Practicum should be made during 
the first week of the Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in 
the forthcoming September. The student should contact the Director 
of Professional Laboratory Experiences in the Department of 
Education. 



94 



Student Teaching 

Student Teaching, the culminating activity of the professional 
sequence, is provided in selected off-campus school centers. The full 
quarter of student teaching is arranged cooperatively by the college, 
the participating schools, and supervising teachers. Completed 
applications for admission to student teaching must be submitted to 
the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences during the first 
week of the quarter preceding student teaching. While student 
teaching, the student is required to adhere to established policies and 
procedures of the cooperating school system in addition to those 
policies and procedures established by the college and the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assignment is 
made. While student preferences and other personal circumstances 
are considered, the Department of Education reserves the right to 
exercise its discretion in placement. The student will receive a letter 
of assignment. Orientation to student teaching will be held during 
the first several days of the quarter in which student teaching is 
scheduled. The following requirements must be met before a student 
can enroll in student teaching: 

1. Be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. 

2. Have at least senior status. All teaching field courses will 
normally have been completed. 

3. Have completed the required professional sequence courses 
with a grade of "C" or higher. Elementary majors must make a 
grade of "C" or higher on all specialized content courses. 
Students in Speech Correction must have completed all of the 
300 level sequence courses in Special Education with a grade of 
"C" or better. 

4. Have a 2.5 average at Armstrong State College on all courses 
attempted, and a 2.2 or higher average on all courses acceptable 
toward the teaching field, concentration, and related elective. 

5. Have satisfactorily completed the related professional labora- 
tory experiences inlcuding the "September Practicum." 

6. Have satisfactorily completed the Media Competency Exami- 
nation. 

7. Be recommended by two academic professors and two 
members of the Department of Education, one of whom must 
be the student's advisor. 

95 



8. Be approved by the Head of the Department of Education. 

9. Students in elementary education must have completed at least 
four of the specialized content courses, including the Teaching 
of Reading and Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher, with 
grades of "C" or better. Students in Speech Correction must 
have completed, with a grade of "C" or better, Special 
Education 410 (Group Processes) and Special Education 415 
(Articulation Problems). 

A student will not be permitted to take additional courses during 
student teaching or to hold any form of employment. Student 
teachers are not permitted to teach in a school in which their 
children are enrolled. 

Programs of Study 

For the programs of study for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Education with majors in Mathematics and Physical Education and 
for the program of study for the Bachelor of Music Education 
degree, please see the appropriate departmental listing in Section IX. 



Bachelor of Science in Education: Speech Correction 

Quarter Hours 
A. General Requirements 76 

1. Humanities: 20 quarter hours 

English 121, 122, 221, and one course selected 

from: Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; 

Philosophy 201; English 222 20 

2. Social Sciences: 25 quarter hours 

History 114*, 115*, and History 251* or 252* 15 

Political Science 113* 5 

Psychology 101 5 

3. Science: 25 quarter hours 

Biology 101, 102 10 

Physical Science 121 5 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 195 or 290 5 



96 



Quarter Hours 
4. Physical Education: 6 quarter hours 

Physical Education 103 1 

Physical Education 117 2 

Three courses selected from: 
P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 
200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 3 

B. Speech Correction 55 

Special Education 225 5 

Special Education 230 5 

Special Education 315 5 

Special Education 320 5 

Special Education 335 5 

Special Education 410 5 

Special Education 411 5 

Special Education 412 5 

Special Education 413 5 

Special Education 415 5 

Special Education 420 5 

Each quarter, following completion of the courses Special 
Education 410 and Special Education 415, the student will 
be assigned cases at the Savannah Speech and Hearing 
Center for supervised clinical practice. 

C. Related Courses 15 

Mental Health 102 5 

Psychology 305, 405 10 

D. Professional Sequence Courses 45 

Psychology 301 5 

Education 203, 301, 330, 425, 446, 447, 448 35 

Special Education 205 5 

TOTAL . .191 

*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 of this section. 



97 



Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

1. Humanities: 30 quarter hours 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; or Philosophy 201 5 

English 121, 122, 221 15 

Speech 228 5 

Sociology 201 or Anthropology 201 5 

2. Social Sciences: 30 quarter hours 

Geography 111 5 

History 114*, 115*, and History 251* or 252* 15 

Political Science 113* 5 

Psychology 101 5 

3. Science: 30 quarter hours 

Biology 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122; Physics 211, 212; or 

Physical Science 121, 122 10 

Mathematics 101 and one of the following: 

Mathematics 103, 195, 220, 290 10 

4. Physical Education: 6 quarter hours 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 3 

B. Electives 25 

1. Approved electives to establish added proficiency in one 
area of concentration chosen to correspond to the 
elementary curriculum: art, language arts, mathematics, 
modern foreign languages, music, sciences, social 
sciences, or teacher library service 20 

2. Approved elective in related field 5 

C. Specialized Content Courses 30 

1. Education 425 5 

2. Mathematics 391 5 

3. Four of the following courses: 20 

Art 320 

Education 434 

English 331 

Music 320 

Physical Education 320 



98 



Quarter Hours 

D. Professional Sequence Courses 40 

Psychology 301 5 

Education 203, 301, 435, 436, 446, 447, 448 35 

TOTAL . .191 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 



Program for Secondary School Teachers 

of Business Education 

(Comprehensive Certification) 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 100 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. Speech 228 5 

3. History 114*, 115* 10 

4. Economics 201, 202 10 

5. Political Science 113* 5 

6. Mathematics 101, 195, 220 15 

7. One of the following two-course sequences: 10 

Biology 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

8. Psychology 101, plus four of the following courses: . .25 
Economics 326 

History 251* or 252* 

Psychology 305 

Sociology 201 

Music 200; Art 200, 290, 291; or Philosophy 201 

B.A. 200 or 205 or Computer Science 110 

B. Courses in Business Education 23-28 

B.E. 104, Beginning Typewriting 2 

B.E. 105, Intermediate Typewriting 2 

B.E. 106, Advanced Typewriting 2 

B.E. Ill, Beginning Gregg Shorthand 3 

B.E. 112, Intermediate Gregg Shorthand 3 

B.E. 113, Advanced Gregg Shorthand 3 

B.E. 212, Office Machines 3 

B.E. 213, Office Procedures 5 

B.A. 315, Business Communications 5 

(B.E. 104 and 111 are often exempted. See course descrip- 
tions.) 99 



Quarter Hours 

C. Courses in Business Administration 25 

B.A. 211, 212 10 

Three of the following courses: 15 

B.A. 307, Business Law I 

B.A. 340, Principles of Marketing 

B.A. 360, Principles of Management 

B.A. 375, Personnel Administration 

Econ. 327, Money and Banking 

Econ. 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 

Econ. 335, Public Finance 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 3 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 200, 
201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 438, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 

TOTAL 191-194 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. Unless 
History 251 or 252 is exempted by examination, one of the courses is required 
as a part of the student's program. 



Program for Secondary School Teachers of Business Education 
(Bookkeeping and Business Management) 

Quarter Hours 
A. General Requirements 100 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. Speech 228 5 

3. History 114*, 115* 10 

4. Economics 201, 202 10 

5. Political Science 113* 5 

6. Mathematics 101, 195, 220 15 

7. One of the following two-course sequences: 10 

Biology 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

100 



Quarter Hours 

8. Psychology 101, plus four of the following courses: . .25 
Economics 326 
History 251* or 252* 
Music 200, or Art 200, or Philosophy 201 
Business Administration 200 or 205 or 

Computer Science 110 
Psychology 305 
Sociology 201 

B. Courses in Business Education 12-14 

B.E. 104, Beginning Typewriting 2 

B.E. 105, Intermediate Typewriting 2 

B.E. 106, Advanced Typewriting 2 

B.E. 212, Office Machines 3 

B.E. 213, Office Procedures 5 

C. Courses in Business Administration 40 

1. B.A. 315, Business Communication 5 

2. B.A. 211, 212, Principles of Accounting 15 

B.A. 301, Intermediate Accounting I 

3. B.A. 307, Business Law I 5 

4. Three of the following courses: 15 

B.A. 302, Intermediate Accounting II 

B.A. 308, Business Law II 

B.A. 340, Principles of Marketing 

B.A. 360, Principles of Management 

B.A 375, Personnel Administration 

Econ. 327, Money and Banking 

Econ. 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 

Econ. 335, Public Finance 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 3 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 200 
201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 438, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 

TOTAL 193-195 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. Unless 
History 251 or 252 is exempted by examination, one of the courses is required 
as a part of the student's program. 

101 



Program for Secondary School Teachers of English 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 90 

1. English 121, 122, 221, 222 20 

2. One Foreign Language 20 

3. Art 200, 290, 291 or Music 200 5 

4. History 114*, 115* 10 

5. History 251*, or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and Political Science 113* 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following two-course sequences: 10 

Biology 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 

B. Courses in Major Field 40 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in 
English, including English 325. 

C. Related Fields 25 

Five of the following courses: 

Fine Arts (300 level or above) 

Foreign Language (300 level or above) 

History (300 level or above) 

Speech 228, 341, 345, 346, 400, 450 

Philosophy 201, 301, 302, 303, 320, 400, 490 

Education 425 
(Five hours of the Related Fields requirement must be 
Speech 228 or Speech 341.) 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 3 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 200, 
201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 439, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 

TOTAL . . .196 



♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 

102 









Program for Secondary School Teachers of Science 
with a Major in Biology 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 90 

1. English 121, 122, 221 and one course 

selected from: 20 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; 
Philosophy 201; English 222 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. History 114*, 115* 10 

4. History 251* or 252* 5 

5. Psychology 101 and one of the following courses: . . .10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

6. Mathematics 101, 220 10 

7. The following courses: 20 

Biology 101, 102 

Botany 203 and Zoology 204 

B. Courses in Major Field 40 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in 
biology including Biology 370, 480; Botany 410 or Zoology 
410. 

C. Courses in Other Sciences 35 

Chemistry 128, 129, 341, 342, 343 25 

Physics 211, 212 10 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 3 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 200, 
201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 444, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 

TOTAL . .206 



♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 

103 



Program for Secondary School Teachers of Science 
with a Major in Chemistry 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 75 

1. English 121, 122, 221, and one course selected from: .20 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; 
Philosophy 201; English 222 

2. History 114*, 115* 10 

3. History 251* or 252* 5 

4. Psychology 101 and one of the following courses: . . .10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

5. Freshman Mathematics and Mathematics 104, 201 . . .20 

6. Chemistry 128, 129 10 

B. Courses in Major Field 50 

Chemistry 281, 380 10 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343 15 

Chemistry 491, 492, 493 12 

Chemistry 480 5 

Chemistry Electives 8 

C. Courses in Other Sciences 25 

Biology 101, 102 10 

Physics 15 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 3 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 444, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 

TOTAL . .191 



*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 

104 



Program for Secondary School Teachers 

of Social Science 

(Behavioral Sciences) 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 85 

1. English 121, 122, 221 and one course 
selected from: 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; 

Philosophy 201; English 222 20 

2. Approved Mathematics Sequence and 

Mathematics 220 (Statistics) 15 

3. Biology 101, 102 10 

4. History 114*, 115* 10 

5. Political Science 113* 5 

6. Psychology 101, 102 10 

7. History 251* or 252* 5 

8. Additional Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

B. Courses in Major Field 40 

Psychology 303, 307, 308, 311, 312, 

410,411,412 

C. Supporting Work 20 

Anthropology 201 and Anthropology 300 or 450 10 

Sociology 201 and Sociology 350 or 450 10 

D. Electives (from the following) 5-10 

Social Work 320 

Psychology 405, 406 

E. Physical Education 6 

P.E. 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: 3 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 
200, 201, 203, 205, 206, 207, 
208, 209 

F. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 440, 446, 447, 448; 

Psychology 301 

TOTAL 191-196 



♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 

105 



Program for Secondary School Teachers of Social Science 
(History or Political Science) 

Quarter Hours 
I. History Concentration 

A. General Requirements 80 

1. English 121, 122, 221 15 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, 290, 291, Music 200, English 222, 

or Philosophy 201 5 

4. History 114, 115* 10 

5. History 251* or 252* 5 

6. Political Science 113* and Psychology 101 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics 

(including Mathematics 220) 10 

8. One of the following two-course sequences: ... .10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

B. Additional Courses in History 

(all must be upper division) 35 

History 300 5 

U.S. History 10 

European History 10 

Non-Western History 10 

C. Supporting work to be selected from at least two 

of the following fields: 40 

1. Political Science 20 

Political Science 200 5 

U.S. Government (300 level) 5 

Political Science Electives (300 level) 10 

2. Economics 20 

Economics 201, 202 10 

Advanced Economics electives 10 

3. Behavioral Sciences 20 

Sociology 350 5 

Psychology 410 5 

Advanced electives in Psychology 

or Sociology 10 



106 






Quarter Hours 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three electives courses 3 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 440, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 



TOTAL . .196 



Quarter Hours 
II. Political Science Concentration 

A. General Requirements 80 

1. English 121, 122, 221 15 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, 290, 291, Music 200, English 222, 

or Philosophy 201 5 

4. History 114, 115* 10 

5. History 251* or 252* 5 

6. Political Science 113* and Psychology 101 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics 

(including Mathematics 220) 10 

8. One of the following two-course sequences: ... .10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

B. Additional courses in Political Science (all must 

be upper division) 35 

At least 5 Q.H. must be taken from each area 

1. Public Administration (300's) 

2. U.S. Government (310's) 

3. International Affairs (320's) 

4. Political Theory (330 's) 

5. Comparative Government (340 's) 

C. Supporting work to be selected from at least two of 

the following fields: 40 

1. History 20 

History 251* or 252* 5 

U.S. History (300 level) 5 

Advanced History Electives 10 

107 



Quarter Hours 

2. Economics 20 

Economics 201, 202 10 

Advanced Economics Electives 10 

3. Behavioral Sciences 20 

Sociology 350 5 

Psychology 410 5 

Advanced Electives in Psychology or 
Sociology 10 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three elective courses 3 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

Education 203, 330, 440, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 



TOTAL . .196 



III. Political Science or History used as minor fields: 

A. History — History 251* or 252* 5 

U.S. History (300 level) 5 

Advanced history electives 

(300 level) A0 

20 

B. Political Science — Political 

Science 200 5 

U.S. Government 

(300 level) 5 

Political Science electives 
(300 level) A0 

20 



*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 

108 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Arts 
with a Major in Economics 

Armstrong State College offers a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Economics. This liberal arts 
program provides a good preparation for anyone who plans to work 
in industry, or pursue further professional education in business, 
economics, education, or law. Requirements for this degree are 
described in the departmental listing for the Department of Business 
Administration. 



Bachelor of Business Administration 

with Majors in Accounting, Economics, Finance, Information 

Systems, Management and Management-Marketing 

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree is offered with a 
choice of specialization. These programs are appropriate for students 
who wish a broad general education in business in addition to a 
concentration in one area. For a description of these programs, see 
the listing under the Department of Business Administration. 



Bachelor of Business Administration 
with a Major in Business Education 

This four-year degree program prepares teachers of high school 
business subjects such as bookkeeping and business management 
and/or secretarial skills such as typing, shorthand, office machines, 
and office procedures. Requirements are listed under the Teacher 
Education section of this bulletin. 



Associate in Arts (Secretarial Studies) 

This two-year program is designed to meet the needs of students 
who wish to qualify for secretarial positions after two years of study. 
The Associate in Arts degree (Secretarial Studies) is awarded upon 
completion of the program. The program requirements are listed 
below: 

Quarter Hours 

1. English 121, 122, 221, and a humanities elective 20 

2. History 114*, 115* 10 

3. One of the following two-course sequences: 10 

Biology 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122 

109 



Quarter Hours 

Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

4. Mathematics 101 5 

5. Three of the following courses 15 

Economics 201 

Political Science 113* 
Psychology 101 
Sociology 201 
History 251* or 252* 

6. Physical Education 103, 117, and 

three courses selected from: 6 

P. E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

7. Secretarial courses: 

Business Education 104, 105, 106 4-6** 

Business Education 111, 112, 113 6-9** 

Business Education 212 3 

Business Education 213 5 

Business Administration 211 5 

Business Administration 315 5 

TOTAL 96-99 

*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 

**Students who have earned high school credit in a one-year course in 
typewriting and /or Gregg shorthand (or the college equivalent— one quarter or 
one semester) may not take for credit the beginning course in the subject in 
which this previous credit has been earned (B.E. 104, B.E. 111). These students 
should begin in the typewriting and/or shorthand sequence with the inter- 
mediate course in the subject. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

The Coordinator of this degree program is Dr. L. B. Davenport, 
Jr., Head of the Department of Biology. Armstrong State College 
cooperates with Memorial Hospital of Chatham County in awarding a 
Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Technology. This program has 
been approved by the Council on Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association and by the Board of Schools of Medical 
Technology of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. The 
student must successfully complete the following courses: 



110 



Quarter Hours 

1. English 121, 122, 221, and one course selected from 20 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; Philosophy 201; English 222 

2. History 251* or 252* 5 

3. Political Science 113* 5 

4. History 114*, 115* 10 

5. Mathematics 101, 220 10 

6. Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 5 

7. Physics 211, 212, 213 15 

8. Chemistry 128-129, 281, 341, 342, 343, 

and 380 35 

9. Biology 101-102, Zoology 204, 356, 

Biology 351, 370, and Zoology 372 35 

10. Physical Education 6 

11. Internship in Clinical Medical Technology 45 

TOTAL . .191 

After satisfactorily completing the required number of courses and 
hours listed above, the degree candidate must complete 12 months in 
Clinical Medical Technology at an approved hospital. Upon 
satisfactory completion of this work, the student will be awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Science and will qualify for the examination 
given by the Registry of Medical Technologists. 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL WORK 

Armstrong State College offers a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Work which is designed to prepare 
students to assume positions in various social service agencies. This 
program is offered cooperatively with Savannah State College and 
makes use of an off-campus facility for various training experiences. 
Requirements for this degree are described in the departmental 
listing for the Department of Psychology and Sociology. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

WITH MAJORS IN MATHEMATICS 

AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Armstrong State College offers the Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree with majors in Mathematics and Physical Educa- 
tion. These specialized degree programs are designed to prepare 
students for careers in the teaching of Mathematics or Physical 



111 



Education. Requirements for the major programs are described in the 
appropriate departmental listings. 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Armstrong State College offers a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Music Education degree designed for those students in 
Music who want to prepare for a career in teaching. Requirements 
for this degree are described in the departmental listing for the 
Department of Fine Arts. 



NURSING 

Associate in Arts In Nursing 

For the two-year program leading to the Associate in Arts degree 
in Nursing, the student must complete the curriculum of 49 quarter 
hours in academic courses and 52 quarter hours of professional 
clinical courses as listed under the Department of Nursing. This 
program provides the student with the opportunity to obtain a 
general education and to study nursing at the college level. Graduates 
are eligible for licensure to practice as registered nurses. The 
curriculum is approved by the Georgia State Board of Nursing 
Examiners and is fully accredited by the National League for 
Nursing. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Armstrong State College offers an upper division undergraduate 
curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing for 
graduate registered nurses from associate degree or diploma nursing 
programs. The program is planned to build on the student's 
previously acquired professional knowledge and experience and is 
designed to prepare registered nurses for first-level leadership 
positions in nursing. Additional information relating to this degree 
program appears under the listing for the Department of Nursing. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 

For the two-year (seven quarters) program leading to the Associate 
in Science degree in Dental Hygiene, the student must complete a 
curriculum of 54 quarter hours in academic courses and 61 quarter 
hours in professional dental hygiene courses. The purpose of this 
program is to provide trained personnel in a rapidly growing and 

112 






important health profession. Dental hygienists provide dental health 
services in private dental offices, civil service positions, industry, and 
in various public health fields. They practice under the supervision of 
a dentist and must pass a state board examination for licensure. The 
curriculum is fully approved by the National Council on Dental 
Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Dental Hygiene Education can be 
earned by an additional two years (six quarters) of study. This 
curriculum of 93 quarter hours is designed to prepare dental 
hygienists for careers in teaching in schools of dental hygiene. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Armstrong State College provides professional education to 
prepare students for careers in many areas in the administration of 
criminal justice. A strong liberal arts emphasis has been developed 
within the criminal justice program, enabling the student to prepare 
for new and demanding requirements in his profession. Specific 
courses in criminal justice are open to all students as electives. 
Students who plan to follow careers in social work, law, journalism, 
or special education may find courses in the criminal justice area 
both interesting and useful. Non-majors should consult with their 
faculty advisors before electing these courses. 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice 

The curriculum for this program has been designed to lead to a 
two-year terminal degree, the Associate in Science in Criminal 
Justice, or to serve as the basic preparation for an upper two-year 
curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal 
Justice. For course requirements, see listing under the Department of 
Criminal Justice. 

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 

Armstrong State College and Savannah State College cooperate in 
the offering of a baccalaureate degree program in the criminal justice 
area. Both colleges award the baccalaureate degree in criminal justice 
with students at each institution enrolling for classes at both 
institutions. A student enrolling in this program at either institution 
should work closely with his on-campus faculty advisor. 

The four-year curriculum for this degree program has been 
designed to provide the broadest possible liberal arts and professional 
training for students who are planning careers in the criminal justice 

113 



area. The student who has earned the Associate in Science degree in 
Criminal Justice may transfer to the baccalaureate program with a 
minimum of difficulty. For specific course requirements, see listing 
under the Department of Criminal Justice. 



MENTAL HEALTH WORK 

Armstrong State College offers a program leading to the Associate 
in Science degree in Mental Health Work. Students in this degree 
program are trained to serve as assistants to professionals in the 
provision of mental health services. The individual who earns this 
degree may return to the college with minimum difficulty to enroll 
in upper division programs leading to a baccalaureate degree. 
Additional information on this degree program is provided in the 
listing for the Department of Psychology and Sociology. 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, a student must 
complete the last 45 quarter hours of course-work in this program at 
Armstrong State College. The program is designed to provide a 
substantial liberal education as a base for upper-division speciali- 
zation. 

Quarter Hours 

1. English 121, 122, 221, and one course selected from: 20 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; Philosophy 201; English 222 

2. History 114*, 115* 10 

3. One of the following two-course sequences: 10 

Biology 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122, 

4. Mathematics 101 5 

5. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 

Political Science 113* 
Psychology 101 
Sociology 201 
History 251* or 252* 






114 



Quarter Hours 

6. Physical Education 103, 117, and 

three courses selected from: 6 

P. E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

7. Electives 35 

TOTAL 96 

(If a student plans to continue work in the future toward a baccalaureate 
degree, he should select courses that will meet the listed requirements of the 
baccalaureate degree program.) 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and footnote on page 91 in this section. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

For the requirements for the Master of Business Administration 
degree and the Master of Education degree in Elementary Education, 
Special Education — Behavior Disorders, Biology, Chemistry, 
English, History, Political Science, or Mathematics, please see the 
Graduate Bulletin. 



COMPLETE LIST OF MAJOR PROGRAMS-FOUR 
YEAR AND TWO YEAR DEGREES 

1. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English. 

2. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English and requirements for 
secondary certification. 

3. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History. 

4. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History and requirements for 
secondary certification. 

5. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science. 

6. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science and 
requirements for secondary certification. 

7. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Psychology. 

8. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Psychology with Mental 
Health Work specialization. 

9. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Psychology and requirements 
for secondary certification in Behavioral Science. 

10. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music. 

11. Bachelor of Music Education. 

12. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology. 

13. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and requirements 
for secondary certification. 

14. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry. 



115 



15. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and require- 
ments for secondary certification. 

16. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics. 

17. Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Mathe- 
matics. 

18. Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 

19. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Ac- 
counting. 

20. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Econom- 
ics. 

21. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Manage- 
ment or in Management-Marketing. 

22. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Business 
Education. 

23. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Finance. 

24. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Infor- 
mation Systems. 

25. Bachelor of Arts in Economics. 

26. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

27. Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

28. Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Speech 
Correction. 

29. Bachelor of Arts with a major in French. 

30. Bachelor of Arts in Social Work. 

31. Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

32. Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. 

33. Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Physical 
Education. 

34. Associate in Arts. 

35. Associate in Arts in Nursing. 

36. Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 

37. Associate in Science in Criminal Justice. 

38. Associate in Science in Mental Health Work. 



GRADUATE DEGREES 



1. Master of Business Administration 

2. Master of Education in: 

Biology 

Business Education 

Chemistry 

Elementary Education 

English 

History 

Mathematics 

Political Science 

Special Education— Behavior Disorders 

116 



IX. DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 
OFFERINGS AND REQUIREMENTS 
FOR MAJORS 

Page 

Academic Skills 119 

Anthropology 215 

Art 165 

Biology 121 

Botany 123 

Business Administration 130 

Business Education 134 

Chemistry 139 

Computer Science 198 

Criminal Justice 145 

Comparative Literature 184 

Dental Hygiene 151 

Economics 136 

Education 156 

English 184 

Entomology 123 

French 189 

Geography 176 

German 190 

Health 209 

History 171 

Journalism 189 

Library Science 158 

Mathematics 194 

Mental Health Work 215 

Music 165 

Nursing 202 

Philosophy 188 

Physical Education 207 

Physical Science 142 

Physics 142 

Political Science 177 

Psychology 216 

Social Work 218 

Sociology 220 

Spanish 191 

Special Education (Speech Correction) 160 

Speech 187 

Zoology 123 



117 



Armstrong State College reserves the right to (1) withdraw any 
course for which fewer than ten students register, (2) limit the 
enrollment in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting 
of all classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as 
demand and faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where the 
same or similar courses have been presented for admission from high 
school. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parenthesis. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory; and the third, the number of 
quarter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biology 101 
- Principles of Biology (4-3-5). 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the 
freshman level; courses numbered 200 to 299, for the sophomore 
level; courses numbered 300 to 399 for the junior level; courses 
numbered 400-499, for the senior level. 

For the requirements for the Master of Business Administration 
degree and the Master of Education degree in Elementary Education, 
Special Education — Behavior Disorders, Biology, Business Edu- 
cation, Chemistry, English, History and Political Science, or Mathe- 
matics, please see the Graduate Bulletin. 



ACADEMIC SKILLS LABORATORY 

Assistant Professor John R. Hansen, Head; Assistant Professors 
Brown, Harris, Padgett, and Cottrell; Instructor Horton. 

The Academic Skills Laboratory provides an opportunity for 
students to remove academic deficiencies in English, Mathematics, 
and Reading which might otherwise prevent their completing college 
work successfully. Institutional credit only is awarded for each 
course offered in the department. This credit does not apply to the 
requirements for a degree program or to the requirements for 
graduation from Armstrong State College. 

Academic Skills Laboratory courses receive students from the 
following five sources: 

1. A conditionally admitted student must enroll in those 
Academic Skills Laboratory courses appropriate to the removal 
of his specific areas of weakness as indicated by results of the 



118 



testing programs through which the student received con- 
ditional admittance status. To insure realistic class scheduling, 
the conditionally admitted student can enroll only in courses 
approved by the head of the Academic Skills Laboratory until 
such time as the student achieves full admission status. 

2. The English or Mathematics Departments may place any 
students, on the basis of the student's performance on the 
English or the Mathematics Diagnostic Test, in the appropriate 
Academic Skills Laboratory courses. 

3. Any student may be placed in any Academic Skills Laboratory 
courses on the basis of an unsatisfactory performance on the 
Rising Junior English Examination. 

4. Any student may voluntarily enroll in any Academic Skills 
Laboratory course. 

5. Any member of the general public may enroll in any Academic 
Skills Laboratory course through the Office of Community 
Services. 



Course Offerings 

ENGLISH 98-Review of Grammar. (5-0-5). Offered each quarter. 
This course involves the study of sentence structure, including 
intensive practice in recognizing and writing English sentences. 

ENGLISH 99— Fundamentals of Composition. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

This is the study and practice of techniques of paragraph 
structure. Students learn to write clearly, logically, coherently, and 
correctly. 

MATHEMATICS 98-Review of Arithmetic. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

Students participate in activities designed to familiarize them with 
scientific notation and the metric system of measurement and to 
eliminate weaknesses in computation involving fractions, decimals, 
integers, and logarithms. 

MATHEMATICS 99-Basic Mathematics. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

Topics include real number arithmetic, polynomial expressions, 
sets, linear and quadratic equations, and applications of geometry 
and trigonometry to measurement. 

READING 98-Reading Skills. (5-0-5). Offered each quarter. 
Students engage in activities designed to increase reading speed 



and comprehension, to enlarge vocabulary, and to increase accuracy 
in spelling. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology.) 

ART 
(See listing under Department of Fine Arts.) 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professor Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., Head; Professor Thorne; 
Associate Professors Beltz and Pingel; Assistant Professors Brower 
and Guillou; Teaching Associate Olmstead. 



Departmental Requirements for the Major 
in Biology 

The major in biology consists of Biology 101, 102, Botany 203, 
Zoology 204, and at least 40 quarter hours credit in biology courses 
(botany, zoology, etc.) numbered 300 or above. The majority of the 
courses in the major numbered 300 or above must be taken in the 
Biology Department at Armstrong State College. 

In addition, biology majors must complete the course sequence in 
organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The course in general college 
physics (15 quarter hours) is strongly recommended and should be 
considered essential for those who expect to continue the study of 
biology beyond the B.S. degree. Majors must also complete a foreign 
language through 103. 

Every student acquiring a major in biology must include in his 
program the following courses: Biology 370; Biology 480; and 
Botany 410 or Zoology 410. If credit for any of these three courses 
is transferred to Armstrong from another college, the department 
may require that it be validated by examination. Unless exempted by 
examination, each student must complete a course in United States 
history. 

To be admitted to courses in biology above the freshman level 
(those numbered 200 or above), the student must have completed 
the prerequisites for each with at least a grade of "C" for each 
prerequisite. To be eligible for a B.S. degree in biology, the student 

120 



must have an average of at least "C" for all upper division courses 
(those numbered 300 or above) in biology. 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong 
courses in biology in high school are advised to take the exami- 
nations for advanced placement which are offered with the College 
Entrance Examinations. Arrangements to take these tests may be 
made through the office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Course Offerings 

BIOLOGY/PSYCHOLOGY 100— Human Sexual Relationships. 
(3-0-3). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: none. 

A scientifically oriented discussion of the anatomy, physiology, 
and psychology of human sexuality. Facts pertinent to population 
problems and venereal diseases will be included. Emphasis will be on 
individual responsibility through knowledge. Credit for either 
biology or psychology. 

BIOLOGY 101-Principles of Biology. (4-3-5). Offered each 
quarter. Prerequisite: none. 

Biological structure; the reproduction and development of 
organisms; the physical and chemical organization of protoplasm and 
cells. 

BIOLOGY 102-Principles of Biology. (4-3-5). Offered each 
quarter. Prerequisite: Biology 101. 

Biological function; bioenergetics of cells, cellular and organismal 
physiology, genetics, differentiation, behavior, ecology, and evo- 
lution. 

BIOLOGY 210— Micro-organisms and Disease. (3-4-5). Spring. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 305 and 306, Zoology 208 and 209, and 
consent of instructor. 

An introduction to the study of micro-organisms with primary 
emphasis on bacteria. The morphology, life history, and importance 
to public health of representative bacteria, fungi, viruses, and 
protozoa are considered. Credit for this course may not be applied 
toward a major in biology. 

BIOLOGY 310— Man and the Environment. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Completion of 75 quarter hours credit in college courses. 

Consideration of the interactions between humans and the support 
systems of the earth which are essential to their existence. Credit for 
this course may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

BIOLOGY 351-Bacteriology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 10 
hours of biological science, Chemistry 128-129. 

A survey of micro-organisms with special emphasis on bacteria and 
their relationships to man. 



121 



BIOLOGY 352— Medical Microbiology. (3-4-5). Prerequisite: 
Biology 351 and permission of the instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the disease-causing microbes in terms of 
their diagnosis, pathology, and epidemiology. 

BIOLOGY 354— Morphologic Haemotology. (3-4-5). Prerequi- 
sites: Biology 102 and Chemistry 129. 

Cytology of normal and pathologic human blood and bone 
marrow with emphasis upon antigenic determination in blood 
banking. 

BIOLOGY 358-Histological Technique. (0-10-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, 
staining, and mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

BIOLOGY 370-Genetics. (3-4-5). Winter. Prerequisites: Biology 
101, 102. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

BIOLOGY 410-Cellular Physiology. (3-4-5). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisites: At least third quarter junior status; two upper division 
courses in biology; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between micro- 
scopic anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, 
metabolism, and growth. 

BIOLOGY 440-Cytology. (2-6-5). Fall, odd numbered years. 
Prerequisite: Two senior division courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differen- 
tiation, and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 450— Evolution. (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: major in 
biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in upper division courses). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 480— General Ecology. (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: 
Two upper division courses in biology (botony or zoology). 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations and 
communities in the field. 

BIOLOGY 490— Problems in Biology. (1-5 hours credit). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisites: At least 20 hours credit in biology courses 
numbered 300 or above; a B average in biology courses and in overall 
work; consent of department head; agreement of staff member to 
supervise work. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
department. Supervised research including literature search, field 
and /or laboratory investigation, and presentation of acceptable, 
written report of results. Credit will depend upon the work to be 
done. Both credit and proposed work must be approved in advance, 



122 



in writing, by the faculty member to supervise the work and by the 
department head. 

BOTANY 203-Survey of the Plant Kingdom. (3-4-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102. 

Morphology and phylogeny of the divisions of the plant kingdom, 
with emphasis upon the evolution of the land flora. 

BOTANY 305— Identification of Flowering Plants. (0-10-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Botany 203. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. 

BOTANY 323— Plant Anatomy. (0-10-5). Fall, even numbered 
years. Prerequisite: Botany 203. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of 
vascular plants, and a comparative study of the structure of roots, 
stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

BOTANY 410— Plant Physiology. (3-4-5). Summer. Prerequisites: 
Botany 203 and Organic Chemistry. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect these processes. 

BOTANY 425— Plant Morphology. (3-4-5). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: Botany 323. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, 
structure, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 

ENTOMOLOGY 301-Introductory Entomology. (3-4-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, 
identification, and biology. 

ZOOLOGY 204-Survey of the Animal Kingdom. (3-4-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101 and 102. 

An evolutionary survey of the major animal phyla. 

ZOOLOGY 208-Human Anatomy and Physiology I. (4-3-5). 
Fall. Prerequisite: Chemistry 305 (may be taken concurrently). 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and 
physiology of the human organ systems. Intended primarily for 
majors in nursing and dental hygiene; credit for this course may not 
be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOOLOGY 209-Human Anatomy and Physiology II. (4-3-5). 
Winter. Prerequisites: Zoology 208, Chemistry 205 and 206 (latter 
may be taken concurrently). 

A continuation of the basic course considering the anatomy and 
physiology of the human. Credit may not be applied toward a major 
in biology. 

ZOOLOGY 325-Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. (3-4-5). Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 204. 



19.2 



A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and 
natural history of the major invertebrate groups. 

ZOOLOGY 355-Embryology. (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Zo- 
ology 204 or equivalent in another biological science. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used to 
illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

ZOOLOGY 356— Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 
(3-6-6). Winter. Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 357-Animal Histology. (3-4-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 204. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and organ 
systems in animals. 

ZOOLOGY 372-Parasitology. (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Zo- 
ology 204. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man 
and other animals. 

ZOOLOGY 410-General Vertebrate Physiology. (3-4-5). Fall. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the 
vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 425— Marine Invertebrate Zoology. (2-6-5). Pre- 
requisite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and department 
head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine 
invertebrates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern 
coastal region. 

ZOOLOGY 429— Endocrinology. (4-4-5). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 410 and one other senior division course in 
biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism 
and reproductive cycles. 

ZOOLOGY 435— Comparative Physiology. (3-4-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ 
systems involved in the maintenance of homeostasis under varying 
conditions within normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues 
and systems under laboratory conditions. 



BOTANY 
(See listing under Department of Biology.) 

124 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Orange Hall, Head; Professors Bhatia, Davis, Eason, 
Richards; Associate Professors Morgan and Squires; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Briercheck, Chambless, DeCastro, Jensen, LaBurtis, Pearce, 
and Zepp; Instructor Alexander. 

The department offers two degree programs: the Bachelor of Arts 
degree with a major in economics and the Bachelor of Business 
Administration degree with majors in accounting, business education, 
economics, finance, information systems, management, and manage- 
ment-marketing. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics is 
appropriate for the student who wishes a broad liberal arts program 
with emphasis on understanding the concepts underlying the working 
of economic systems. The program provides a good preparation for 
anyone who plans to work in industry, especially banking, insurance, 
or investments. It also provides excellent preparation for positions in 
government, or further professional education in business, 
economics, education, or law. This program requires proficiency in a 
foreign language through the 201 level or completion of the calculus 
sequence. 

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a major in 
business education is designed to prepare teachers of high school 
business subjects, such as bookkeeping and business management, 
and/or secretarial skills, such as typing, shorthand, office machines, 
and office procedures. This program is described under the Teacher 
Education section of this bulletin. 

The programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Business 
Administration with a major in accounting, economics, finance, 
information systems, management, or management-marketing re- 
quire, in addition to the general college core requirements, a 
common business core of ten courses, and a major concentration of 
six courses in the respective major field. These programs are most 
appropriate for students who wish a broad general education in 
business and economics and, in addition, a significant amount of 
specialized background in a single area to enhance their prospects for 
immediate employment in industry or government. 

Students in all programs should be familiar with general degree 
requirements as listed in the "Degree Programs" section of this 
bulletin, and should satisfy the college core requirements during the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. No student will be allowed to take 
upper division courses in his major unless he has a minimum grade of 
"C" in all prerequisite courses. An average of at least 2.0 in his major 

125 






concentration courses is a requirement for graduation, and college 
academic regulations, stated elsewhere in this bulletin, impose certain 
additional degree requirements. 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Economics 

Quarter Hours 

A. Humanities 20 

English 121, 122, and 221 

One of the following courses: 
Art 200, Art 290, Art 291, Music 200, 
Philosophy 201, English 222 

B. Mathematics and the Natural Sciences 20 

Mathematics 101, 103 

A Laboratory Science sequence 

C. Social Sciences 20 

History 114*, 115* 
Political Science 113* 
One course selected from: 

Psychology 101, Sociology 201, Anthropology 201 

D. Courses Appropriate to the Major Field 30 

Economics 201, 202 

Mathematics 220 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 

or 
Mathematics 104, 201, 202 

E. Physical Education 6 

P. E. 103 and P. E. 117 

Three of the following courses: 

P. E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

F. Major Concentration 40 

Economics 305, 306, 312, 435 and four other 300 or 
400-level economics courses 

G. Related Areas 35 

Proficiency in a foreign language at the 201 level is 
required if a foreign language is offered in satisfaction 
of the requirements under part "D" above. If calculus 



126 






Quarter Hours 

is offered in satisfaction of part "D" above, completion 
of the calculus sequence is required. The remaining 
hours are to be selected from upper-division courses in 
history, mathematics, computer science, political 
science, psychology, or sociology— at least ten hours 
and not more than fifteen hours in any one area. The 
proficiency requirement in U. S. History must be 
satisfied. 

H. Electives 20 

TOTAL. . .191 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. 



BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(With a major in accounting, economics, finance, information 
systems, management, or management-marketing). 

Quarter Hours 

A. Humanities 20 

1. English 121, 122, 221, and one course 

selected from: 20 

Art 200, 290, 291; Music 200; 
Philosophy 201; or English 222 

B. Mathematics and Natural Science 25 

1. Mathematics 101, 195, 220 15 

2. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

C. Social Sciences 30 

1. History 114*, 115* 10 

2. Economics 201, 202 10 

3. Political Science 113* 5 

4. Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 5 

D. Courses in Business Administration 15 

1. B.A. 211, 212 10 

2. B.A. 200 or 205, or Computer Science 110 5 

(Computer Science 110 is required for the major in 
Information Systems. B.A. 200 may not be taken for credit 
by upper-division business majors who have taken 300-level 
courses in business or economics.) 

127 



Quarter Hours 

E. Physical Education 6 

Total Freshman-Sophomore Hours 96 

F. Approved electives 30 

Electives from the Humanities, the Social Sciences, Natural 
Sciences, or Mathematics. At least 15 quarter hours must be 

in courses numbered 200 or above. Not more than 10 
quarter hours may be in 300 and 400 level Business 
Administration courses. Business Administration 205 or 
Computer Science 110 may be taken but not both. 

G. Business Core Requirements 35 

B.A. 307, Business Law 

B.A. 320, Business Finance 
B.A. 340, Principles of Marketing 
B.A. 360, Principles of Management 
Economics 311, Quantitative Methods or 

Economics 312, Econometrics 
Economics 327, Money and Banking or Economics 306, 

National Income Analysis 
One of the following: 

B.A. 308 (Accounting majors only) 

Economics 305, Managerial Economics 

Economics 311 or 312 (Information Systems majors are 

required to have both Economics 311 and Economics 

312) 
Economics 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 
Economics 335, Public Finance 
Economics 405, Government and Business 
Economics 431, Investments 

H. Major Concentration 30 

TOTAL . .191 



128 



MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS 

1. ACCOUNTING 

B.A. 301, 302-Intermediate Accounting I, II, and four of the 
following: 

B.A. 329-Cost Accounting I 
B.A. 330-Cost Accounting II 
B.A. 436-Income Taxation I 
B.A. 437-Income Taxation II 
B.A. 440-Information Systems 
B.A. 450- Auditing Principles 
B.A. 455-Advanced Accounting 

2. ECONOMICS 

Econ. 305-Managerial Economics 
Econ. 306-National Income Analysis 

Econ. 435-Seminar on Contemporary Economic Problems, and 
the remaining hours selected from the following: 

Econ. 311-Quantitative Methods 

Econ. 312-Econometrics 

Econ. 326-Economic History of the United States 

Econ. 335-Public Finance 

Econ. 345-Economic Development 

Econ. 350-Transportation Economics 

Econ. 405-Government and Business 

Econ. 410-International Trade 

Econ. 420-Comparative Economic Systems 

Econ. 431-Investments 

Econ. 445-Independent Study 

3. FINANCE 

B.A. 580-Corporate Financial Policies or 

B.A. 465-Business Policy 
B.A. 425-Managerial Accounting or 

B.A. 301-Intermediate Accounting I or 

B.A. 329-Cost Accounting I 
Four of the following: 

B.A. 308-Business Law II 

B.A. 404-Real Estate 

B.A. 407-Principles of Insurance 

B.A. 436-Income Taxation I 

B.A. 437-Income Taxation II 

Econ. 306-National Income Analysis 

Econ. 325-Personal Finance 

Econ. 335-Public Finance 

Econ. 431-Investments 



129 



4. INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Computer Science 231, Business Language I 

Computer Science 232, Business Language II 

Computer Science 301, Computer Organization and Programming 

Computer Science 306, Data and Programming Management 

Ten additional Computer Science courses having the approval of 
the Computer Science major advisor. 

5. MANAGEMENT 

B.A. 425-Managerial Accounting 

B.A. 465-Business Policy and four of the following: 

B.A. 308-Business Law II 

B.A. 315-Business Communications 

B.A. 301-Intermediate Accounting I or 
B.A. 329-Cost Accounting I 

B.A. 344-Principles of Salesmanship 

B.A. 348-Advertising 

B.A. 375-Personnel Administration 

B.A. 411-Marketing Management 

B.A. 412-Marketing Research 

B.A. 460-Production Planning and Control 

B.A. 462-Human Relations in Industry 

Economics 305-Managerial Economics 

Economics 350-Transportation 

Economics 405-Government and Business 

Psyc. 320-Industrial Psychology 

6. MANAGEMENT-MARKETING 
B.A. 411-Marketing Management or 

B.A. 412-Marketing Research 
B.A. 465-Business Policy, and one or more of the following: 
B.A. 344-Principles of Salesmanship 
B.A. 348-Advertising 
B.A. 411-Marketing Management 
B.A. 412-Marketing Research 

The remaining hours to be selected from the list under MANAGE- 
MENT above. 

Course Offerings 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 200-Survey of Business (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter, Summer. 

A first course in business for Business Administration majors or an 
elective for non-majors who wish to gain an understanding of the 
functioning of business enterprises in our capitalistic system. The 
course will provide a basic familiarity with: (a) the economic, social, 
and political environment in which business enterprises operate, and 
(b) the tools and managerial skills used in business decision-making in 

130 



the various functional areas such as organization, management, 
financing, marketing, production and personnel. (Not open to 
upper-division business majors who have already taken 300-level 
work). 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 205-Data Processing. (5-0-5). 
Spring. 

A study of the basic methods, techniques, and systems of manual, 
mechanical, electrical and electronic data processing systems and an 
analysis of the application of these systems to business and industry 
with emphasis on the manager and the role of management. Included 
in the course of study are the telecommunication terminal systems 
and the languages necessary to communicate with a computing 
system. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 211-Introductory Accounting I. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals, 
partnerships and corporations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 212-Introductory Accounting 
II. (5-0-5). Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 211. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems, such 
as departmental operations, manufacturing accounts, the analysis of 
financial statements, accounting aids to management, statement of 
application of funds. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 301 -Intermediate Accounting I. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an 
application of accounting theory. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 302-Intermediate Accounting 
II. (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 301. 

A continuation of Business Administration 301, emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the 
application of these, and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis of these theories. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 307-Business Law I. (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects: Contracts, offer and acceptance, consideration, rights of 
third parties and discharge; agency, liabilities of principal and agent; 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 308-Business Law II. (5-0-5). 
Winter. 

The law applicable to the following subjects: partnership for- 
mation, powers and liabilities of partners; corporation, formation, 

131 



powers, rights of security holders; sales, vesting of title, warrants, 
remedies. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 315-Business Communications. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter. Prerequisites: English 121, 122. 

The development in the student of an awareness of the problems 
in communicating in modern business; the principles of effective 
business communication and the application of these principles to 
the writing of business reports, memorandums, letters, news releases, 
newsletters, agendas, programs, annual reports, and other business 
information media, including the instruments of the job-application 
process. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 320-Business Finance. (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

The internal and external sources of financing for business 
enterprises; acquisition and management of long-term and shorter- 
term funds; types of securities; equity and debt instruments; 
problems of financial management. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 329-Cost Accounting I. (5-0-5). 
Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing, 
including job order and process methods. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 330-Cost Accounting II. 
(5-0-5). Summer. Prerequisite: Business Administration 329. 

Standard cost procedures; budgeting; distribution costs and special 
cost problems. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 340-Principles of Marketing. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 202. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers or ultimate users. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 344-Principles of Salesmanship. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: B.A. 340. 

A detailed investigation and analysis of the myriad techniques 
utilized in the selling process. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 346-Retailing. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisite: B.A. 340. 

An examination of the fundamentals necessary to establish and to 
manage effectively a successful retail concern. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3 48 -Advertising. (5-0-5). Fall. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 340. 

Consideration of advertising and its relation to the overall 
marketing function. Includes media planning and selection, creativity 
and problem areas. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 360-Principles of Management. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Upper-division status or per- 
mission. 

The basic principles of management applicable to all forms of 
business and to all levels of supervision; the functions of planning, 

132 



organizing, directing, and controlling as components of the manage- 
ment process. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 375-Personnel Administration. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Upper-division status or per- 
mission. 

Personnel administration as a staff function. Employment stan- 
dards, training, safety and health, employee services and industrial 
relations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 404-Real Estate. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisites: Upper-division status or permission. 

Principles and practices concerned with the economic, financial, 
managerial, and marketing aspects of commercial and industrial real 
estate planning and utilization. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 407-Principles of Insurance. 
(5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Principles of Accounting I 
and II, Principles of Economics I and II. 

Introduction to the basic principles of life, property, liability and 
other areas of insurance. Consideration is given to the importance of 
risk in personal and business affairs and the various methods of 
handling risk. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 411-Marketing-Management. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Business Administration 340 and 360. 

Management of marketing organizations, with emphasis on plan- 
ning, organizing and controlling the marketing organization; internal 
and external communications; marketing management decision- 
making. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 412-Marketing Research. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisites: Business Administration 340, Math 
220. 

Sampling, survey, experimental and other research techniques for 
determining customer preferences and market potentials. Inter- 
pretation and presentation or research findings for management 
decision-making. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 42 5 -Managerial Accounting. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Emphasizes theory and practice of accounting from the standpoint 
of those who direct business operations and shape business policy. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 436-Income Taxation I. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

A study of federal income tax law and regulations; the income tax 
returns of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 437-Income Taxation II. 
(5-0-5). Spring or Summer. Prerequisite: Business Administration 
436 or consent of instructor. 



133 



A continuation of Business Administration 436 with emphasis on 
corporations and fiduciary returns, gift taxes, and estate taxes. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 450-Auditing Principles. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 302. 

The principles of audits and financial verifications, standards of 
field work, preparation of audit working papers, writing audit 
reports, auditing ethics. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 455-Advanced Accounting. 
(5-0-5). Summer. Prerequisites: Business Administration 301 and 
302. 

Selected problems in accounting. Analysis and evaluation of 
methods used for organizing and solving special accounting problems. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460-Production Planning and 
Control. (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Business Administration 360, Mathe- 
matics 220. 

The principles of production management are developed through 
study of plant layout, inventory control, materials handling, pro- 
duction scheduling, quality control, and associated topics. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 462-Human Relations in 
Industry. (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisites: Business Administration 360. 
Business Administration 375 and Psychology 101 are desirable. 

A study of the process of integrating people into the work 
situation so that they are motivated to work together harmoniously, 
productively, and with economic, psychological, and social satisfac- 
tion. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 465-Business Policy. (5-0-5). 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: Business Administration 320, 340, 360, 
Mathematics 220, and senior status. 

Problem solving and decision making by top management. An 
integrating course, taught by the case method. Should be taken in 
the student's final quarter, if possible. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 104-Beginning Typewriting. (5-0-2). 
Fall. 

Development of basic skill; introduction to typewritten letters, 
tabulations, and manuscripts (includes term papers and book 
reports). Students who have earned high school credit in one-year 
course in typewriting (or the college equivalent— one quarter or one 
semester) may not take this course for credit. These students should 
begin the typewriting sequence with Intermediate Typewriting, 
Business Education 105. 



134 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 105— Intermediate Typewriting. 
(0-5-2). Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Business Education 104 or 
equivalent. 

Improvement of basic skill; tabulations, business forms, letters, 
memorandums, and manuscripts; emphasis on production rate. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 106-Advanced Typewriting. (0-5-2). 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Business Education 105 or equivalent. 

Major emphasis on production rate; tabulations, letters, and 
manuscripts; varied business forms and other information media. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION Ill-Beginning Gregg Shorthand. 
(5-0-3). Fall. Prerequisite or corequisite: Business Education 104 or 
equivalent. 

Complete theory; reading, dictation and transcription from 
studied material to 60 words a minute. Students who have earned 
high school credit in a one-year course in Gregg Shorthand (or the 
college equivalent— one quarter or one semester) may not take this 
course for credit. These students should begin the shorthand 
sequence with Intermediate Gregg Shorthand, Business Education 
112. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 112-Intermediate Gregg Shorthand. 
(5-0-3). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Education 111 or equivalent 
and Business Education 104 or equivalent. 

Improvement of basic skill; mailable copy; reading; dictation and 
transcription from studied and new material to 90 words a minute. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 113-Advanced Gregg Shorthand. 
(5-0-3). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Education 112 or equivalent 
and Business Education 104 or equivalent. 

Improvement of basic skill; reading; mailable copy; dictation and 
transcription from studied and new material to 120 words a minute. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 212-Office Machines. (3-2-3). Spring. 

Development of skill in the use of adding-listing machines, 
calculating machines, dictating-transcribing machines, reproducing 
machines, and the proportional-space typewriter; course syllabus 
adapted to individual student's needs. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 213-Office Procedures. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisites: Business Education 105 and Business Education 112 or 
their equivalent. 

Development of an understanding of administrative services 
common to modern business; work flow; interpersonal relationships; 
records maintenance and management. 



135 



ECONOMICS 

ECONOMICS 201-Principles of Economics I. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: At minimum, eligibility to enter 
Mathematics 101. 

A study of the principles underlying the economic institutions of 
the present time and their application to economic problems. 
Aggregative or macroeconomics is emphasized. 

ECONOMICS 202-Principles of Economics II. (5-0-5). Winter, 
Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: At minimum, eligibility to enter 
Mathematics 101. 

Microeconomics, with emphasis on the theory of prices and factor 
shares. If a student plans to take only one economics course, 
Economics 201 would be more suitable than Economics 202. 

ECONOMICS 305— Managerial Economics. (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Economics 201, 202. 

Microeconomic applications to decision-making and policy for- 
mulation in the business firm. Production costs, pricing, and market 
structures. 

ECONOMICS 306— National Income Analysis. (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202. 

Income and employment analysis; money and interest; monetary 
and fiscal policy; inflation and unemployment. 

ECONOMICS 311— Quantitative Methods. (5-0-5). Fall or Spring. 
Prerequisites: Economics 202, Mathematics 195, 220. 

Applications and limitations of mathematical techniques to 
business and economic problems. Decision making under un- 
certainty. Inventory control. Linear, integer, and dynamic pro- 
gramming. 

ECONOMICS 312-Econometrics. (5-0-5). Fall or Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Economics 202, Mathematics 195, 220. 

Applications and limitations of statistical techniques to business 
and economic problems. Limitations of ordinary least squares. Data 
problems. Index numbers. Sampling techniques. 

ECONOMICS 325-Personal Finance. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Math 
101. 

This course is devoted to family financial matters such as 
budgeting expenditures, taxes, loans, charge accounts, savings media, 
life insurance, investment securities, mutual funds, estate planning, 
trusts, wills, estate and gift taxes. 

ECONOMICS 326-Economic History of the United States. 
(5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis 



136 



on the period since 1860, and including developments in agriculture, 
industry, labor, transportation, and finance. 

ECONOMICS 327— Money and Banking. (5-0-5). Fall, Spring. 
Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202. 

Monetary theory, banking theory and practice, central bank 
controls, other financial institutions, credit flows, monetary policies 
to achieve desired economic efforts. 

ECONOMICS 331-Labor and Industrial Relations (5-0-5). Win- 
ter, Summer. Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

The development and structure of the labor movement in the 
United States; the principles of wage determination; collective 
bargaining; and public policy toward labor unions. 

ECONOMICS 335-Public Finance. (5-0-5). Spring, Summer. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 201. 

The economic effects of governmental taxation, expenditures, and 
public debt management. The principal sources of revenue and types 
of expenditures at the federal, state, and local levels. The proper 
scope of government and issues of fairness in taxation. 

ECONOMICS 345— Economic Development. (5-0-5). Alternate 
Falls. Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202. 

The nature and cause of economic stagnation in developing 
nations of the world, urgent need for their economic development, 
theory of economic growth, ways of fostering development, and 
balanced growth and industrialization. 

ECONOMICS 350-Transportation Economics. (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Upper-division status or permission. 

The economic aspects of transportation; significant developments 
in the fields of highway transport, water transport, and air transport, 
and in regulatory policy concerning the transportation industry. 

ECONOMICS 405— Government and Business. (5-0-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: upper-division status. 

The effects of public policies upon business and industry with 
emphasis on anti-trust, taxation, regulatory and defense policies. 

ECONOMICS 410-International Trade. (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202, and Economics 327 or 
consent of instructor. 

Export-import trade, emphasizing exchange techniques, balance of 
trade and payments accounts, and the theory of international 
specialization and exchange, the relationship of international 
transactions to national income. 

ECONOMICS 420-Comparative Economic Systems. (5-0-5). 
Alternate Springs. Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202. 

Study of economic problems under different economic systems 
such as capitalism, socialism; and introduction to Marxian economic 
theory. 

137 



ECONOMICS 431-Investments. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

The investment risks in different investment media; selection of 
appropriate media in accordance with individual or institutional goals 
and risk-bearing capacity. Types of investments and securities. 

ECONOMICS 435— Seminar on Contemporary Economic 
Problems. (5-0-5). Alternate Springs. Prerequisites: Economics 201 
and 202, and two 300-level economics courses. 

General problems of production, employment, and income, with 
special reference to the specific problems faced by the American 
economic system. 

ECONOMICS 445— Independent Study. (5-0-5). Offered on de- 
mand. 

Mature students of economics may be permitted to undertake 
special independent studies in one or more aspects of economics, 
under the supervision and guidance of a member of the faculty. 
Normally, the subject matter covered will parallel a bulletin- 
described course which is only infrequently offered. The student will 
meet frequently with his advisor and will be expected to submit 
reports in depth on his studies. Approval of the Advisor and the 
Department Head will be necessary for admittance to this course. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 
(See listing under Department of Business Administration.) 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Professor Henry E. Harris, Head; Professor Stratton; Associate 
Professors Brewer and Robbins; Assistant Professor Whiten; Teaching 
Associate Goette. 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in Chemistry 

Unless exempted by examination, each student must complete a 
course in United States history. 

Quarter Hours 
I. Major Requirements 
A. Lower Division: 

General Chemistry (128, 129, 281) 15 



138 



Quarter Hours 
B. Upper Division: 

Chemistry 380 5 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343 15 

Chemistry 491, 492, 495, 496 12 

Electives from the following: 13 

Chemistry 421 4 

Chemistry 441 3 

Chemistry 448 5 

Chemistry 461 5 

Chemistry 480 5 

II. Requirements in Related Fields 

A. Mathematics through Calculus 10 

B. Physics 15 

Course Offerings 

CHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY 121-122-General Chemistry. (4-3-5 for each 
course). Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. Offered on demand. 

These courses are designed for the student who is pursuing a 
non-science college major. They include a study of the fundamental 
laws and theories of inorganic chemistry. Included in the second 
quarter is a survey of organic chemistry and an introduction to 
biochemistry. These courses are a lecture-laboratory study with 
minimum reliance on mathematics. 

CHEMISTRY 128-129-General Chemistry. (4-3-5 for each 
course). Prerequisite: College Algebra or equivalent. Offered each 
quarter. 

These courses are the first two of the series 128, 129, 281 required 
to complete an academic year of General Chemistry. A study of the 
fundamental principles and laws of chemistry with a quantitative 
approach to the subject. These courses are designed for the science, 
pre-medical and engineering student. The laboratory work includes 
an understanding of fundamental techniques. 

CHEMISTRY 205-206-Essentials of General Chemistry. (3-0-3 
for each course). Fall, Winter. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, and biochemistry with 
emphasis on applications in human physiology. Experimental 
principles will be illustrated with classroom demonstrations. 

CHEMISTRY 281-Qualitative Analysis (3-6-5). Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. 

This course is the third of the series 128, 129, 281 required to 
complete an academic year of General Chemistry. Study of ionic 

139 



equilibria and separation methods. Homogeneous solutions involving 
dissociation, hydrolysis and buffer action, and heterogeneous 
systems showing the influence of pH and complexation on solubility 
are illustrated. Various chemical and chromatographic techniques are 
used as a basis for qualitative analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 301-The Chemistry of Life (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science 
completed. 

An introductory course covering selected areas of applied bio- 
chemistry. This course is not recommended for chemistry, biology, 
or premedical students. 

CHEMISTRY 341-342-Organic Chemistry. (4-3-5 for each 
course). Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. Fall, Winter. 

These courses include the study of aliphatics, aromatic hydro- 
carbons and their derivatives, polyfunctional compounds, and poly- 
nuclear hydrocarbons. Organic reactions are emphasized in terms of 
modern theory. 

CHEMISTRY 343— Organic Chemistry. (4-3-5). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 342. Spring. 

A continuation of the organic chemistry sequence 341, 342. This 
course completes the fundamental study of organic chemistry with a 
consideration of carbohydrates, amino acids, and heterocyclics with 
their related compounds. 

CHEMISTRY 350— Chemical Literature. (2-0-2). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 342. Offered on demand. 

A study of the use of the chemical library and the important 
journals, references, and information sources. 

CHEMISTRY 380— Quantitative Instrumental Analysis. (2-9-5). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 281. Winter. 

A study of the principles of gravimetric, volumetric, spectro- 
photometric, and electrometric methods of analysis. The laboratory 
will provide practice in techniques and application of these 
principles. 

CHEMISTRY 421-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3-3-4). Prere- 
quisite: Chemistry 380. Offered on demand. 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase stu- 
dents' understanding of mechanisms of chemical reactions. Empha- 
sizes the periodicity of elements. 

CHEMISTRY 431-432-Seminar. (3-0-3 for each course). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 343. Offered on demand. 
Selected topics for group discussion. 

CHEMISTRY 441-Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3-0-3). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 343. Fall. 



140 



A further study of important organic reactions emphasizing 
theories of reaction mechanisms of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 448— Organic Qualitative Analysis. (2-6-4). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 343. Offered on demand. 

Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

CHEMISTRY 461— Biochemistry. (4-3-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
343. Offered on demand. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and cellular 
metabolism. Subject topics include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, 
enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes, anaerobic carbohydrate metabo- 
lism, lipid metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative 
phosphorylation, and photosynthesis. 

CHEMISTRY 462— Biochemistry. (4-3-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
461. Offered on demand. 

A study of the metabolism of ammonia and nitrogen-containing 
compounds, the biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, metabolic 
regulation, and selected topics. 

CHEMISTRY 463-Clinical Chemistry. (4-3-5). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 343. Offered on demand. 

A study of the principles of chemistry applied in the clinical 
laboratory. Topic subjects to include instrumentation and micro- 
techniques. 

CHEMISTRY 480— Advanced Instrumental Analysis. (2-9-5). Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 380, 342. Offered on demand. 

Includes study of principles involved in the operation and the 
laboratory use of special instruments for analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 491-492-Physical Chemistry. (5-0-5 for each 
course). Prerequisites: Chemistry 380; Physics 213; Mathematics 
201. Winter, Spring. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the study 
of solids, liquids, gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics and 
solutions. These courses will also cover a study of chemical 
equilibria, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum 
mechanics and nuclear chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 495-496-Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (0-3-1 
for each course). Corequisite: Chemistry 491, 492 respectively. 

Selected experiments to demonstrate applications of physical 
chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 498-499-Special Problems. (Schedule and credit 
vary). Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
Department. Supervised research including literature search, labora- 
tory experimentation and presentation of results. Course credit will 
depend on problem. 



141 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 121-Physical Environment. (4-3-5). Pre- 
requisite: admission requirements. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and concepts of 
physics and astronomy. This course is designed for non-science 
majors interested in a descriptive survey. The laboratory study is 
designed to supplement the study of theory. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 122— Physical Environment. (4-3-5). Pre- 
requisite: admission requirements. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and theories of 
chemistry. This is a descriptive course which includes the classi- 
fication of elements, basic chemical reactions, and atomic structure 
designed for the non-science major. The laboratory study includes 
experiences which augment class discussion. 

ASTRONOMY 301-Introduction to Astronomy. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science 
completed. 

A study of the planetary system, stars, stellar structure, and 
cosmology. 

GEOLOGY 301-Principles of Geology. (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science 
completed. 

An introduction to physical and historical geology. A study of the 
origin, evolution, and structure of the earth's crust, and geologic 
history. 

OCEANOGRAPHY 301-Principles of Oceanography. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory 
science completed. 

A study of the basic principles of oceanography. Topic subjects to 
include the distribution of water over the earth, nature and relief of 
the ocean floors, tides and currents, chemical properties of sea water 
and constituents, and applications of oceanographic research. 

PHYSICS 

PHYSICS 211— Mechanics. (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
103. Fall. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213 in general 
physics. Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound, and heat. 
Designed for students with aptitude in mathematics below the level 
of calculus. Selected experiments to demonstrate applications. 

PHYSICS 212-Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light. (4-2-5). Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 103 and Physics 211. Winter. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Basic 
electricity, magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

142 



PHYSICS 213— Light Phenomena, Modern Physics. (4-2-5). Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 103 and Physics 212. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Continues the 
study of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes 
with the study of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work 
includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 217— Mechanics. (5-3-6). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
104, or concurrently. Fall, Summer. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219 in general 
physics. Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound and heat. 
Designed especially for engineering students and recommended for 
science majors. Selected experiments to demonstrate applications. 

PHYSICS 218-Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light. (5-3-6). Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 217. Winter. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Basic 
electricity, magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

PHYSICS 219-Light Phenomena, Modern Physics, (5-3-6). Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 218. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Continues the 
study of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes 
with the study of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work 
includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 380-Introductory Quantum Mechanics. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Physics 213 or Physics 219 and Mathematics 201. 

An introduction to Quantum mechanical principles with applica- 
tions in atomic and molecular structure. 

PHYSICS 417-Mechanics. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Physics 217 or 
211 and Mathematics 201. Physics 218 or 212 and Mathematics 341 
are recommended. 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and of systems of 
particles are developed using Newtonian principles. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 
(See listing under Department of Mathematics.) 

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Associate Professor James W. Witt, Head; Assistant Professor 
Megathlin, Acting Head; Assistant Professor Magnus. 



143 



Two programs of study are available to the student who wishes to 
study in the criminal justice area— a two-year program leading to the 
degree of Associate in Science in Criminal Justice with a concen- 
tration in corrections or in law enforcement and a four-year program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. Each 
student should work closely with the Head of the Department in 
planning his program for either of the two degrees. 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice 
With a Concentration in Law Enforcement 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 56 

1. English 121-122 10 

2. Art 200, 290, 291, Music 200, or Philosophy 201 5 

3. Mathematics 101 5 

4. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

5. History 251* or 252* and Political Science 113* 10 

6. Psychology 101 and Sociology 201 10 

7. Physical Education 6 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

Criminal Justice 100, 103, 104, 201, 202, 205, 250 or 203, 301 

TOTAL . . .96 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice 
With a Concentration in Corrections 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 56 

1. English 121-122 10 

2. Art 200, 290, 291, Music 200, or Philosophy 201 5 

3. Mathematics 101 5 

4. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

5. History 251* or 252* and Political Science 113* 10 

6. Psychology 101 and Sociology 201 10 

7. Physical Education 6 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

Criminal Justice 100, 102, 103, 205, 250 or 307, 301, 304, 306 

TOTAL . . .96 

At least 45 hours of the program must be completed at 
Armstrong. 



144 



Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 

Students who intend to major in Criminal Justice should complete 
Criminal Justice 100 before the end of the freshman year and should 
complete all general education requirements as soon as possible. 
Criminal Justice majors must complete the required Criminal Justice 
courses with a grade of "C" or better. 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 66 

1. English 121, 122, 221 15 

2. Art 200, 290, 291, Music 200, Philosophy 201 

or English 222 5 

3. Mathematics 101 and either 195 or 220 

orC. S. 110 10 

4. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

5. Political Science 113* and History 

114* and 115* 15 

6. Psychology 101, Sociology 201, Economics 201, 

or Anthropology 201 5 

7. Physical Education 6 

B. Courses Appropriate to Area of Concentration 30 

1. Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 5 

2. History 251* or 252* 5 

3. Criminal Justice 100, 103, 201, 205 20 

C. Area of Concentration 30 

Criminal Justice 300, 301, 303, 305, 403, 490 

D. Electives from Related Areas 65 

Sixty-five hours chosen from a list of selected electives. No 
more than fifteen hours may be taken from any one 
department except Criminal Justice. Seven of these courses 
must be 300-400 level courses. 



TOTAL . .191 

*A student in either the associate or the baccalaureate degree program may 
exempt these courses with credit awarded. See "Academic Regulations" and 
"Degree Programs" sections. 



Course Offerings 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 100— Introduction to Criminal Justice 
Systems. (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course deals with a systematic study of the agencies involved 
in the process of criminal justice. Required of all criminal justice 
majors. 

145 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 102-Introduction to Corrections. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. 

This course deals in the following areas: Correctional goals and 
organization, inmates (characteristics, behavior, classification, etc.), 
security and interpersonal relations. Although this course is designed 
primarily for those practitioners who are currently working in 
correctional institutions, it is open to all criminal justice majors. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 103— Developing Interpersonal Communi- 
cation Skills. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

The emphasis of this course will be placed upon the development 
of interpersonal communication skills, i.e., skills that can be 
effectively utilized on the job to improve interaction among 
employees and between employees and the public. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 104-Basic Law Enforcement. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. 

This course will include a study of the police system in the United 
States, an overview of the basic purposes and objectives of the 
average police department, and an introduction to police ethics and 
professionalization. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 201-Criminal Procedure. (5-0-5). Winter. 

A survey of the distinctive features of, and the basis for, American 
Criminal Law buttressed by an analysis of leading court decisions 
relative to procedural rights emanating from the Bill of Rights. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 202-Law of Evidence. (5-0-5). Fall. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evidence in criminal cases. 
Particular subjects will include burden of proof, hearsay evidence, 
and the principles of exclusion and selection. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 203-Criminal Law. (5-0-5). Winter. 

History and development of criminal law with definitions and 
general penalties. Special emphasis will be placed upon the Georgia 
Penal Code. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 204-Criminal Investigation. (5-0-5). 
Spring. 

Introduction to investigative methodology. Special techniques 
employed in criminal investigation, such as crime scene searches, the 
use of informants, and the techniques of surveillance will be 
emphasized, as well as the presentation of police cases in court. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 205-Criminal Behavior Systems. (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

The course is designed to study the different criminal behavior 
systems. The course will include (1) a discussion of the construction 
of types of crime, (2) the formulation and utilization of a typology 
of crime based on criminal behavior systems, and (3) the presenta- 
tion of some of the most important research on types of crime. 



146 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 250— Directed Readings in Criminal Justice. 
(5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

A course designed to permit each student to pursue an approved 
topic through independent study and research under the guidance 
and direction of the instructor. This course is designed to familiarize 
students who do not intend to pursue a four-year degree program 
with the fundamentals of practical research. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 300-Research Methods in Criminal Justice. 
(5-0-5). Winter. (Students who have previously earned credit for this 
course when it was numbered C. J. 200 may not receive additional 
credit for this course.) 

This course deals with the methods and techniques of research in 
the behavioral sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to 
evaluate research. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 301-Juvenile Delinquency. (5-0-5). Fall. 
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 100 or consent of instructor. 

A survey of theories of juvenile delinquency, the sociological, 
biological, and psychological factors involved in juvenile delinquency 
and the modern trends in prevention and treatment. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 302— Criminalistics. (5-0-5). Summer. Pre- 
requisite: a natural science laboratory sequence. 

An introduction to the problems and techniques of scientific 
criminal investigation. Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the 
student with the role of science and technology in modern law 
enforcement. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 303-Penology. (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Criminal Justice 100 or consent of instructor. 

This course deals with the analysis and evaluation of both 
historical and contemporary correctional systems. This course will 
also deal with the development, organization, operation and results 
of the different systems of corrections found in America. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 304-Probation and Parole. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 303. 

This course will deal with the development, organization, opera- 
tion and results of systems of probation and parole as substitutes for 
incarceration. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 305-Law Enforcement Systems. (5-0-5). 
Fall. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 100. 

An introduction to the philosophical, cultural and historical 
background of the police idea. This course is conceptually oriented 
and will deal with concepts such as the role of the police in 
contemporary society, the quasi-military organization of the police, 
and community relations. 



147 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 306— Correctional Counseling. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 303. 

This course deals with the nature and function of counseling in a 
correctional setting. The different theoretical approaches and tech- 
niques of counseling as they can be applied in a correctional setting 
will be investigated. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 307-Community Base Treatment. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 303. 

This course will investigate the different community base 
treatment programs. An emphasis will be placed on investigating the 
function of half-way houses and the use of volunteers in corrections. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 308-Criminal Justice Planning. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 

Origins and evolution of modern day planning. Planning as a 
process of criminal justice decision-making. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 402-Civil Liberties. (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Criminal Justice 201 or Political Science 317. 

Problems will be drawn from the substantive and procedural 
aspects of constitutional law and explored in the context of the 
current friction between the values of order and individual liberty. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 403-Judicial Process. (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Criminal Justice 201 or Political Science 317. 

Courts as political subsystems in comparative perspective. Judicial 
decision-making and the development of public policy through the 
judicial process. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 404-Correctional Treatment. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 303, 306. 

This course involves an evaluation of specific programs and 
experiments in institutional treatment. An emphasis will be placed 
on the institutional adjustment, the preparation for institutional 
release and post-release facilities. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 405-Group Methods in Corrections. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 306. 

This course will investigate the group dynamics and the group 
processes as they can be applied to a correctional setting. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 406-Law and Society. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 403 or the consent of the instructor. 

The study of the theory and philosophy of law and the 
relationship between law and society. Current controversies such as 
civil disobedience and law and personal morality will receive special 
attention. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 407-Legal Aspects of Corrections. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice 201, 303. 



148 



The course deals with the legal problems from convictions to 
release. Legal problems will be investigated in the following areas: 
pre-sentence investigation, sentencing, probation, parole, incarcera- 
tion, and loss and restoration of civil liberties. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 408-Human Relations. (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Sociology 201. 

This course will deal in the area of human relations as a means of 
controlling and changing people. Emphasis will be placed on effective 
listening and effective communication. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 440-Seminar in Criminal Justice. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Open to seniors only or by consent of the 
instructor. 

An intensive study of selected topics relative to the concept of 
criminal justice. Subject matter will vary annually. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 450-Field Experience I. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal justice 
majors only and by invitation of the instructor. 

The purpose of this course is to broaden the educational 
experience of students through appropriate observation and work 
assignments with criminal justice agencies. This course will be 
organized around specific problem orientations with operational 
research connotations. Students will be expected to spend a 
minimum of five hours per week with the participating agency. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 451-Field Experience II. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal justice 
majors only and by invitation of the instructor. 

This is a sequential course to Criminal Justice 450 which will 
permit the student to further broaden his perspectives. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 452— Internship. (Maximum 15 Hours 
Credit.) Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Open only to senior 
criminal justice majors. 

This course is deisgned to provide the student with an opportunity 
to apply academic training in the practical criminal justice setting. 
Settings will include law enforcement agencies (state or federal), 
community treatment facilities, and the courts. This course will be 
jointly supervised by college staff and law enforcement, correctional 
and court officials. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 490-Directed Research in Criminal Justice. 
(5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Open only by invitation of 
the instructor. 

A course designed to provide qualified students the opportunity to 
perform suitable and meaningful research into some area of criminal 
justice under the direction of the instructor. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL HYGIENE 

Assistant Professor Richard M. Steinke, Head; Instructors Coursey 
and Tanenbaum. 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 

The curriculum in dental hygiene at Armstrong State College was 
established in the fall of 1968 and approved by the Council on 
Dental Education in May, 1973. 

The purpose of the program is to meet the ever-increasing need for 
individuals educated in this rapidly growing and important health 
profession. Dental hygienists are in demand to provide dental health 
services in private dental offices, civil service positions, school 
programs, and various public health fields. They practice under the 
supervision of a dentist and must pass a state board examination for 
licensure. 

Admission to this two-year program is limited to 30 in each class. 
Students enroll in the fall of each year. Application for admission 
should be completed by April 15 for the fall quarter, including a 
transcript of course work up to that date. A complete transcript shall 
be submitted as soon as possible thereafter. A student who transfers 
into the program courses equivalent to Chemistry 205, 206 and/or 
Zoology 208, 209 will be required to complete successfully 
validation examinations in the subject matter areas of these courses. 

A passing grade in all natural science courses must be maintained 
for the student to be allowed to continue in the Dental Hygiene 
courses during the freshman year. The student must earn a "C" or 
better in each Dental Hygiene course before he or she will be allowed 
to register for subsequent Dental Hygiene courses; therefore, the 
grade of "C" or better in the previous course(s) is prerequisite for 
each Dental Hygiene course for which the student registers after the 
first quarter of the freshman year. An overall GPA of 2.0 is required 
for graduation from the program. 



150 



GENERAL EDUCATION 

Qtr. Hrs. 

Chemistry 205 and 206 6 

Zoology 208 and 209 10 

English 121 5 

Psychology 101 5 

Sociology 201 5 

Biology 210 5 

P. E. Elective 1 

Speech 228 2 

P. E. 211** 2 

History 251 or 252* 5 

Political Science 113* . 5 

54 



DENTAL HYGIENE 
EDUCATION 

Qtr. Hrs. 
Dental Hygiene 111 

and 112 3-3 

Dental Hygiene 113 3 

Dental Hygiene 114 

and 115 2-2 

Dental Hygiene 116 2 

Dental Hygiene 117 3 

Dental Hygiene 118 2 

Dental Hygiene 119 3 

Dental Hygiene 120 3 

Dental Hygiene 121 2 

Dental Hygiene 211, 

212, 213 5-5-5 

Dental Hygiene 214 3 

Dental Hygiene 215 2 

Dental Hygiene 216 1 

Dental Hygiene 217 3 

Dental Hygiene 218 2 

Dental Hygiene 219 2 

Dental Hygiene 220 4 

Dental Hygiene 221 . . .1 

61 



*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" and "Degree Programs" sections. 

**Required by Council on Dental Education, American Dental Association. 



Course Offerings — Freshman and Sophomore 

DENTAL HYGIENE Ill-Clinical Dental Hygiene I. (2-3-3). Fall 
Quarter. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the dental 
hygiene profession. The subject matter includes fundamental 
knowledge of clinical procedures and techniques of removing stains 
and deposits from the teeth. Clinical procedures are introduced first 
on manikins and then applied in the mouth. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 112-113-Clinical Dental Hygiene II and III. 
(1-6-3) (1-6-3). Winter and Spring Quarters respectively. Pre- 
requisites: Dental Hygiene 111. 

Students continue with oral prophylactic techniques on patients in 
the clinic under supervision. The subject matter includes advanced 
procedures which the hygienist will use in the performance of duties. 
The student must apply acquired knowledge in all clinical situations. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 114-115-116-Dental Anatomy and Physi- 
ology. (1-3-2) (1-3-2) (1-3-2). Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters 
respectively. 

This sequential course includes nomenclature, tooth morphology, 
oral histology and embryology, head and neck anatomy, medical and 
dental emergencies, and growth and development. The course 
material will be presented by lecture, demonstration and directed 
experience. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 117-General and Oral Pathology (3-0-3). 
Spring Quarter. 

This course is designed to familiarize dental hygiene students with 
the principles of general pathology in relation to the common 
diseases of oral regions. Emphasis will be placed on clinical 
manifestations and the importance of early recognition of abnormal 
conditions. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 1 18-Periodontics. (2-0-2). Summer 
Quarter. 

This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of 
periodontics. Emphasis will be placed on the significance of patient 
education and dental prophylaxis in the prevention of periodontal 
disease. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 119— Dental Materials. (2-3-3). Summer 
Quarter. 

This course is designed to provide a general understanding of the 
chemical, physical and mechanical properties of dental materials. The 
indications and limitations of materials will be stressed as well as 
proper manipulation of those materials used by dental hygienists. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 120-Dental Roentgenology. (2-3-3). 
Summer Quarter. 

This course will include a series of lectures, demonstrations, and 
directed experience in the fundamentals of dental roentgenology. 
Intra-oral techniques for the taking and processing of radiographs are 
taught and laboratory time will be devoted to demonstration and 
directed experience. Clinical time in subsequent quarters will afford 
the application of the principles to clinical situations. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 121-Applied Nutrition. (2-0-2). Spring 
Quarter. 

This course presents the biochemical aspects of nutrition as 
applied to the practice of dentistry. Students are instructed in diet, 
history taking, and dietetic counseling. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 211-212-213-Clinical Dental Hygiene IV, 
V, and VI. (1-12-5) (1-12-5) (1-12-5). Fall, Winter and Spring 
Quarters respectively. Prerequisites: Dental Hygiene 111, 112, 113. 

These courses are a continuation of the preceding clinical courses. 
Emphasis centers on improved proficiency in all areas of a working 

152 



clinic. Lecture time is devoted mainly to the discussion of ex- 
periences encountered in clinical situations. Pertinent material 
related to the dental hygiene profession is included in these courses. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 214-Anesthesiology and Pharmacology. 
(3-0-3). Fall. 

This course is a study of drugs and anesthetics with special 
consideration given to those used in dentistry. It is designed to 
acquaint the student with the principles of drug action in the human 
patient. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 215-Preventive Dentistry. (2-0-2). Fall. 

The principles of prevention of oral diseases are presented. 
Emphasis is placed on training the student in the utilization of oral 
physiotherapy aids and on education and motivation of patients in 
proper oral hygiene. Clinical time in subsequent quarters will afford 
the application of these principles to clinical situations. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 216-Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene. 
(1-0-1). Fall. 

This course is designed as a seminar to acquaint students with the 
ethical responsibilities of the dental hygienist, the jurisprudence 
governing the practice of dental hygiene, and the structure and 
function of the American Dental Association, the Georgia Dental 
Association, and the American Dental Hygienists Association. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 217-Dental Health Education and Public 
Health. (3-0-3). Winter. 

This course includes demonstrations and practical applications of 
modern methods of dental health education. Developing teaching 
materials for dental health education and the presentation of 
materials are included. 

This course also introduces the student to the various aspects of 
public health with reference to the needs of the community. 
Information concerning opportunities for participation in public 
health dentistry by the dental hygienist is included. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 218-Dental Assisting. (2-0-2). Winter. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
contributions to the provision of dental services by dental auxiliary 
personnel. The principles of assistant utilization are presented and 
application of these principles is made during clinical experience. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 219-Total Patient Care. (2-0-2). Winter. 

This course is a series of lectures designed to acquaint the student 
with the subject matter and practice of the various dental specialties 
in relation to the patient's total health. Emphasis is placed on 
periodontics, its treatment and the role of the dental hygienist in 
maintenance of oral health. 



153 



DENTAL HYGIENE 220-Directed Field Experience. (0-12-4). 
Spring. Prerequisites: Speech 228, Dental Hygiene 215, 216, 217, 
218, 219. 

Students will receive directed field experience in public health 
dentistry and dentistry for the handicapped. They will also ex- 
perience planned learning experiences in private dental offices. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 221-Director's Seminar. (1-0-1). Spring. 

The student will be given the opportunity to reflect on the 
learning experiences of the dental hygiene curriculum and the role of 
the hygienist as a member of the health team. 



Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

An additional two years of study (six quarters) are offered to 
graduates of accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs 
who are registered dental hygienists. The enrollment is limited to 
those applicants with a minimum of one year of professional 
experience who wish to prepare themselves for a second career in 
Dental Hygiene Education. 

In addition to courses listed for the Associate in Science in Dental 
Hygiene Degree, the following courses must be completed. 

English 122, 221 10 Dental Hygiene 401 5 

Mathematics— a 10 qtr. hr. Dental Hygiene 402 5 

sequence 10 Dental Hygiene 403 5 

History 114*, 115* 10 Dental Hygiene 404 5 

Philosophy 201 5 20 

Education 301 5 

Psychology 301, 305 10 

Education 330 5 

P. E. Electives 3 



58 *These courses may be exempted by 



Electives 15 



examination with credit awarded. 
See "Academic Regulations" and 
73 "Degree Programs" sections. 



Course Offerings 

DENTAL HYGIENE 401-Practicum in Dental Hygiene Educa- 
tion I. (1-8-5). Offered on Demand. 

An introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene 
clinic, with emphasis on observation, individual and small group 
teaching, and teacher aide work. The first professional course for 
majors in Dental Hygiene Education. 



154 



DENTAL HYGIENE 402— Practicum in Dental Hygiene Educa- 
tion II. (1-8-5). Offered on Demand. 

A continuation of Dental Hygiene 401. Problems common to 
beginning dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed 
to accomplish program objectives, the establishment and organiza- 
tion of content, methods of clinical evaluation and supervision in the 
dental hygiene clinic. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 403-Practicum in Dental Hygiene Educa- 
tion III. (1-8-5). Offered on Demand. 

An advanced field experience, designed to assist the student in the 
development of learning activities, teaching procedures, and the 
presentation of materials pertinent to dental hygiene education. The 
student will develop and teach selected units in the basic dental 
hygiene sequence. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 404-Dental Hygiene Independent Study. 
(2-6-5). Offered on Demand. 

Individual independent study and field work in an area of major 
interest with special relevance to dental hygiene and future career 
objectives. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology.) 

ART 
(See listing under Department of Fine Arts.) 

ECONOMICS 

(See listing under Department of Business Administration.) 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professor William W. Stokes, Head; Associate Professors Newberry 
and Ward; Assistant Professors Barber, Boney, Lentini, Simensen, 
and White. 

The purpose of the Department of Education is to coordinate the 
college-wide programs of teacher education and to offer professional 
courses for the pre-service and in-service preparation of teachers. For 
specific requirements of the teacher education programs offered by 
the college, see "Teacher Education" under "Degree Programs." 



155 



Course Offerings 

EDUCATION 203— Orientation to Teaching. (5-0-5). Each 
quarter. 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a 
profession. The student engages in directed self-study and plans for 
the achievement of his professional goals. 

EDUCATION 301— Child Development and the Educative Process. 
(2-8-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Education 203. 

A study of the developmental learning characteristics of pupils in 
relation to ways in which the school environment may elicit further 
development. Students attend seminars on campus and serve as 
junior professionals in selected elementary schools. Enrollment 
limited to 12 students per section. 

EDUCATION 307— Growth and Development of the Young 
Child. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of inter-relatedness of the aspects of growth and 
development: physical-motor, social-emotional, and intellectual- 
cognitive for the young child. A unification of theory and research 
utilizing directed observations and a study of various measurements 
appropriate with young children will be included. 

EDUCATION 308-Child and His Family. (5-0-5). Offered on 
Demand. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of children including the parent-child, parent-teacher, 
relationships and cultural factors which affect children and their 
families. Techniques for development of parent involvement in the 
total developmental processes. 

EDUCATION 309— Materials and Methods of Early Childhood 
Education. (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Education 307. 

The study of curricula needs, materials and techniques appropriate 
for use with young children. 

EDUCATION 310— Practicum in Nursery-Kindergarten Edu- 
cation. (2-8-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Education 309. 

Provides opportunities for directed experience with children under 
six. Students attend seminars and work in selected preschool 
programs. 

EDUCATION 330-Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
General. (3-6-5). Each quarter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, Psychology 301. 

The study of secondary school curriculum and methods. Detailed 
study is given to techniques of systematic observation, preparation of 
behavioral objectives, analysis of critical incidents, production of 
media materials, practices of classroom control, and examination of 
instructional models. Directed practicum. 



156 



EDUCATION 425— The Teaching of Reading. (5-0-5). Each 
quarter. Prerequisites: Education 203 and Admission to Teacher 
Education, or permission of instructor. 

The teaching of reading including approaches, techniques, 
materials, and evaluating growth. 

EDUCATION 426— Practicum in Individualized Reading Instruc- 
tion. (2-8-5). Offered on Demand. Prerequisite: Education 425. 

This course is designed to provide prospective teachers with 
directed practice and observation in the teaching of reading. Special 
emphasis will be placed upon diagnosis and teaching of needed 
reading skills. Students will be placed under the supervision of 
teachers who have been selected for their competency in the teaching 
of reading. Open to Elementary Education majors only. 

EDUCATION 434-Methods and Curriculum of Elementary 
Science. (5-0-5). Winter and Summer. 

Provides prospective teachers with a better concept of the meaning 
of science, processes for translating this concept into classroom 
practice and a variety of ways for helping children learn science, with 
special emphasis on the kind of inquiry that engages them in the 
processes of discovery. 

EDUCATION 435— Elementary School Curriculum. (5-0-5). 
Summer, Fall, Winter. Corequisite: Education 436. Prerequisites: 
Education 301 and Psychology 301, or permission of the instructor, 
and admission to the teacher education program. 

The study of existing organizational patterns of the school and 
experiences in curriculum planning, evaluation, trends, and design. 
Directed observation. 

EDUCATION 436-Elementary School Methods. (5-0-5). 
Summer, Fall, Winter. Corequisite: Education 435. Prerequisites: 
Education 301 and Psychology 301, or permission of the instructor, 
and admission to the teacher education program. 

The study and evaluation of teaching methods, materials, and 
equipment in the various teaching fields. Actual unit development in 
preparation for student teaching. 

EDUCATION 438-Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Business Education. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Admission to 
Teacher Education, Psychology 301. 

The study of secondary school business education curriculum with 
emphasis upon materials and methods of teaching business educa- 
tion. Directed observation. 

EDUCATION 439-Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
English. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, 
Psychology 301. 

The study of secondary school English curriculum with emphasis 



157 



upon materials and methods of teaching English. Directed observa- 
tion. 

EDUCATION 440— Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Social Science. (5-0-5). Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: Admission to 
Teacher Education, Psychology 301. 

The study of secondary school social science curriculum with 
emphasis upon materials and methods of teaching social science. 
Directed observation. 

EDUCATION 441— Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Mathematics. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Admission 
to Teacher Education, Psychology 301, and 12 hours of 300 or 400 
level mathematics courses. Corequisite: Mathematics 311, Mathe- 
matics 336. 

The study of secondary school mathematics curriculum with 
emphasis upon materials and methods of teaching mathematics. 
Directed observations. 

EDUCATION 443— Methods and Curriculum in Health, Physical 
and Recreation Education. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. Pre- 
requisites: Admission to Teacher Education, Psychology 301, Educa- 
tion 330. 

The study of secondary school Health, Physical and Recreation 
Education curriculum with emphasis upon materials and methods of 
teaching Health, Physical and Recreation Education. Directed obser- 
vation. 

EDUCATION 444— Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Science. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Teacher Education, Psychology 301, and Education 330. 

The study of secondary school science curriculum with emphasis 
upon materials and methods of teaching science. Directed obser- 
vations. 

EDUCATION 446-447-448-Student Teaching. (15 quarter 
hours). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: See "Teacher Education" 
section under "Degree Programs." 

Students are placed in selected schools for one quarter as full time 
student staff members. No additional credit hours may be earned 
while student teaching. Classroom teaching experiences and other 
staff responsibilities are jointly supervised by the college staff, 
supervising teachers, and principals in the selected schools. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 110— Introduction to Library Research and 
Materials. (1-0-1). 

An orientation to the Lane Library, library terminology, general 
research methods, and major library aids, such as the card catalog, 



158 



classification and subject heading guides, general periodical and 
newspaper indexes, encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, handbooks 
and yearbooks. This is a survey course to acquaint the student with a 
Library's potential to answer his information needs as a student, 
civilian, researcher, or business person. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 111— Special Periodicals and Bibliographies. 
(1-0-1). 

A survey of special periodical and book indexes as well as atlases; 
gazetteers; biographical tools; reviews and criticisms; and national, 
state, local, and selected international and foreign documents, guides 
and tools. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 310-Reference Materials. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. 

Study and evaluation of basic reference sources for effective 
reference service in elementary and secondary schools. Designed to 
give the student a working knowledge of a library as an information 
and resource center. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 311— Introduction to Library Research and 
Materials. (2-0-2). 

An orientation to the Lane Library, library terminology, general 
research methods, and major library aids such as the card catalog, 
classification and subject heading guides, general periodical and 
newspaper indexes, encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, hand- 
books, yearbooks, atlases, gazetteers, biographical tools, reviews and 
criticism, and national, state, local, and selected international and 
foreign documents, guides and tools. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 312— Information Resources in the 
Humanities. (1-0-1). 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and 
search techniques in the Humanities. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 313— Information Resources in the Social 
Sciences. (1-0-1). 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and 
search techniques in the Social Sciences. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 314— Information Resources in the 
Sciences. (1-0-1). 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and 
search techniques in the Sciences. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 320-Cataloging and Classification of 
School Library Materials. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

Introduction to the basic principles of cataloging and classification 
of books and audiovisual materials through the use of Dewey and 
Library of Congress classification. The card catalog, shelf list, 
physical procession, and procedure for ordering and using printed 
cards will be studied. 

159 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 410-Materials Selection. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. 

Selection and evaluation of books and non-book materials; 
emphasis on those which meet curriculum needs and interest, and 
which represent various levels of difficulty; ways of stimulating their 
use. Attention will be given to selection aids and reading guidance. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 420-School Library Administration and 
Organization. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

Basic organization of books, non-book materials, and services for 
effective use in school libraries. Administering the budget, purchase 
of materials, personnel, circulation, inventory, weeding, and instruc- 
tion in the use of library materials will be considered. Examination 
of the improvement of instruction by correlating library use with 
school curricula. 

SPEECH CORRECTION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 205-Introduction to Exceptional 
Children. (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study of the different kinds of exceptional children with 
emphasis on etiological factors, educational implications, and re- 
habilitation requirements. Primary consideration will be given to 
general discussions of mental retardation, emotional and social 
disturbances, visual and hearing impairments, physical handicaps, and 
speech and language disorders. Observations. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 225-Phonetics for Speech Correc- 
tionists. (2-6-5). Spring. 

Deals with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in 
speech correction, IPA transcription of normal and defective 
articulation and the important characteristics of regional dialects are 
stressed. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 230-Anatomy and Physiology of the 
Speech and Hearing Mechanism. (5-0-5). Fall. 

Anatomy and physiology of the head, neck, and thorax from a 
speech and hearing standpoint. Special emphasis is placed on 
functional considerations of the respiratory system, larynx, oral and 
nasal structures, and ear. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 315-Normal Speech and Language De- 
velopment. (5-0-5). Winter. 

The study of normal language development with emphasis on oral 
language. This course traces developmental scales of speech and 
language growth across various age levels and includes the relation- 
ship between speech and language. Observations. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 320-Psychology of Speech. (5-0-5). 
Spring. 



160 



Basic principles of psychology as they apply to speech, with 
emphasis on learning, motivation, emotions, intelligence, personality, 
social relations, and psychological effects of speech disorders. 
Observations. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 335-Speech Science. (3-4-5). Fall. 

Speech communication from a psychophysical standpoint. Study 
focuses on acoustics, physics of speech, transmission media, and 
physical analysis of speech. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 410— Group Processes and Program Ad- 
ministration. (3-4-5). Spring. 

Administration of public school speech correction programs and 
methods of public school speech correction as related to working 
with children in groups. Characteristics of task oriented small group 
behavior and interaction are studied. Supervised clinical practice. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 411 -Stuttering. (5-0-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Instructor. 

An introduction to the problem of stuttering, its possible causes 
and the management and training of cases. Observations. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 412-Language Disorders. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

An introduction to language disorders of children and adults. 
Etiologies, evaluation procedures, and therapeutic approaches are 
studied. Major emphasis will be given to delayed language develop- 
ment and aphasia. Observations. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 413— Organically Based Communication 
Problems. (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

The course includes a study of the communication problems 
related to disorders of voice, cleft palate, and cerebral palsy. 
Observations. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 415-Articulation Disorders. (2-6-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Special Education 325. 

A study of the etiology, rationale, evaluation, and methods of 
therapy for disorders of articulation. The course includes the 
development of a therapeutic program, lesson plans, and supervised 
clinical practice. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 420-Introduction to Audiology. (2-6-5). 
Fall. 

An introduction to the methods of hearing assessment through 
pure tone and speech audiometry, with a focus on rehabilitation of 
the hearing impaired. Supervised clinical practice. 



161 



ENGLISH 
(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

(See listing under Department of Biology.) 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Harry Persse, Head; Assistant Professors Brandon and 
McKinnell; Instructor Ambrose. 



Degree Programs in Music 

The Department of Fine Arts offers the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with a major in music and the Bachelor of Music Education degree. 
The Bachelor of Music Education Degree is given in cooperation with 
Savannah State College. The course descriptions indicate which 
Savannah State College courses may substitute for equivalent courses 
at Armstrong State College. 




162 



Admission Requirements 

Since the college-level study of music presupposes a considerable 
background in music, as well as an aptitude for it, an audition is 
required for admission to the program. The audition will be used to 
determine the student's level of proficiency in his instrument and his 
potential for success in the program. 



Music Core Courses 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Music 
and the Bachelor of Music Education degree will complete the 
following music core courses: 

Quarter Hours 

Elementary Music Theory 111, 112, 113 9 

Intermediate Music Theory 211, 212, 213 9 

Music Ensemble 251, 252, or 254 6 

Applied Music 141, 142, 143 6 

241, 242, 243 6 

Music History 371, 372, 373 9 

Music Theory 312 . 3 

TOTAL 48 



Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Quarter Hours 

Music electives 15 

Applied Music 341, 342, 343 6 

441, 442, 443 6 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 15 

Art History 290, 291 10 

Academic Electives 25 

Physical Education . 6 

TOTAL 83 



163 



Requirements for the Music Education Degree 

Quarter Hours 

Music 221, 222, 223, 225 5 

Music 350, 351 7 

Music 352, 353 4 

Music 361, 381 6 

Applied Music 331, 332, 333 

431, 432 5 

Education 203, 330, 446, 447, 448 25 

English 228 5 

Psychology 301 5 

Physical Education (including P. E. 103, 117) 6 

Academic Electives .15 

TOTAL 83 

Unless exempted by examination, a student in either of the two 
degree programs must complete a course in United States history. 

Music Majors are required to: 

1. Enroll for applied music each quarter until the applied music 
requirement has been met (except when student teaching). 

2. Participate in an ensemble of the college each quarter (except 
when student teaching). 

3. Participate in student recitals as directed by the applied music 
instructor. A student must perform in a quarterly recital at least once 
a year. 

Minimum keyboard proficiency is required of all majors. This will 
be demonstrated by the ability to play simple hymns, standard 
cadences and simple piano pieces. 

The achievement of a minimum level of proficiency in applied 
music is a requirement for graduation. Proficiency tests will be 
administered at jury examinations during the student's senior year. 

Music Education majors will enroll for applied music each quarter 
with the exception of the quarter in which they are student teaching. 
A minimum of twelve hours credit will be in the principal 
instrument. A minimum of three quarters will be in the secondary 
instrument. For those whose principal instrument is voice, the 
secondary instrument should be piano, and for piano principals, 
voice. 

Music majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree may, by 



164 



appropriate selection of upper-division courses, arrange concen- 
trations in performance, music literature and theory-composition. 

Course Offerings 

ART 

ART 101— Basic Design and Drawing. (3-4-5). Alternate years. 

An introduction to compositional design in monochrome. 
Emphasis on drawing from observation using a variety of media and 
approaches. 

ART 102— Basic Design and Drawing. (3-4-5). Alternate years. 
An introduction to the use of color in the solution of design 
problems. 

ART 103— Basic Design and Drawing. (3-4-5). Alternate years. 

An introduction to drawing the human figure. Includes basic 
anatomy for the artist, the study of master drawings of the human 
figure, and drawing directly from live models. 

ART 200-Introduction to the Visual Arts. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter. 

The study of theories of art and their application in masterworks 
of art from all ages, directed toward increasing the understanding and 
enjoyment of art for the non-art major. Not recommended for 
students who have credit for Art 291. 

ART 201— Drawing and Painting. (0-6-3). Alternate years. 
An introduction to painting in oils from various observed subjects 
and from sketches. 

ART 202— Drawing and Painting. (0-6-3). Alternate years. 
A continuation of Art 201. 

ART 203-Drawing and Painting. (0-6-3). Alternate years. 
An introduction to watercolor painting in the studio and from 
nature. 

ART 290-History of Art. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

A survey of world art from ancient times through the Baroque. 

ART 291-History of Art. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

A survey of world art from the end of the seventeenth century to 
the present. Not recommended for students who have credit for Art 
200. 

ART 320-Art for the Elementary Teacher. (4-2-5). Fall, Winter. 
A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the 
elementary school level. 

Course Offerings 

MUSIC 

MUSIC 100-Rudiments of Music. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 



165 



An introduction to the principles of music reading with appli- 
cations to the keyboard, guitar and simple wind instruments. May 
not be used for credit toward a degree in music. 

MUSIC Ill-Elementary Theory. (3-2-3). Fall. 
An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music 
including sightsinging, eartraining and keyboard harmony. 

MUSIC 112-Elementary Theory. (3-2-3). Winter. 
A continuation of Music 111 with emphasis on part- writing and 
diatonic material. 

MUSIC 113-Elementary Theory. (3-2-3). Spring. 
A continuation of Music 112 introducing seventh chords and 
diatonic modulation. 

MUSIC 200-Introduction to Music Literature. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand music by means 
of analysis of style, forms, and media of musical expression. 

MUSIC 211— Intermediate Theory. (3-2-3). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Music 113. 

A continuation of Music 113 with emphasis on chromatic 
harmony. 

MUSIC 212-Intermediate Theory. (3-2-3). Winter. 
A continuation of Music 211. 

MUSIC 213— Intermediate Theory. (3-2-3). Spring. 
A continuation of Music 212 with emphasis on twentieth century 
techniques. 

MUSIC 221-Brass and Percussion Instrument Methods. (0-3-2). 
Alternate years. 

An introduction to the principles of brass and percussion 
instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUSIC 222— Woodwind Instrument Methods. (0-2-1). Alternate 
years. 

An introduction to the principles of woodwind instrument 
performance and pedagogy. 

MUSIC 223— String Instrument Methods. (0-2-1). Alternate years. 
An introduction to the principles of string instrument per- 
formance and pedagogy. 

MUSIC 225-Voice Methods. (0-2-1). Alternate years. 
An introduction to the principles of voice production with 
emphasis on pedagogical applications. 

MUSIC 226-Piano Class. (0-2-1). Offered on demand. 
A study of keyboard techniques with emphasis on the skills 
needed to fulfill the piano proficiency requirement. 

166 









MUSIC 227-Voice Class. (0-2-1). Offered on demand. 

A study of voice production techniques with practical application 
to standard song literature. Not open to students whose principal 
instrument is voice. 

MUSIC 228-229-Diction in Singing. (2-0-2) (2-0-2). 
A study of phonetics and pronunciation of Italian, German, 
French, and English as applied to singing. 

MUSIC 251-Concert Band. (0-3-1). 
Open to qualified students. 

MUSIC 252-Stage Band. (0-3-1). 
Open to qualified students. 

MUSIC 254-Chorus. (0-3-1). 

Open to qualified students. 

(A student is limited to six hours of ensemble credit.) 

*MUSIC 312— Form and Analysis. (3-0-3). Alternate years. Pre- 
requisite: Music 213. 

The study of the principles of form in music and techniques of 
harmonic analysis. Equivalent substitute at Savannah State College: 
Music 311. 

MUSIC 320— Music for the Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). Winter, 
Summer. 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elementary 
classroom teacher. Not open to music majors. 

MUSIC 350-Music in the Lower School. (3-0-3). Alternate years. 

A course for music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of 
techniques and materials for teaching music in the lower school. 
Equivalent substitute at Savannah State College: Music 301. 

MUSIC 351-Music in the Middle and Upper School. (4-0-4). 
Alternate years. 

A course for music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of 
techniques and materials for teaching music in the junior and senior 
high schools. Equivalent substitute at Savannah State College: Music 
308. 

MUSIC 352-Band Methods. (2-0-2). Offered on demand. 
A course dealing with the organization, maintenance and develop- 
ment of school instrumental ensembles. 

MUSIC 353-Choral Methods. (2-0-2). Offered on demand. 
A course dealing with the organization and development of school 
choral ensembles. 

MUSIC 361— Orchestration and Arranging. (3-0-3). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Music 213. 

♦Offered only at Savannah State College during 1974-1975. 

167 



An introduction to the techniques of arranging and scoring for 
vocal and instrumental ensembles. Equivalent substitute at Savannah 
State College: Music 307. 

*MUSIC 371— Music History. (3-0-3). Alternate years. Pre- 
requisite: One year of music theory or permission of the instructor. 

The history of music in Western Civilization from its origins 
through the Renaissance. Equivalent substitute at Savannah State 
College: Music 314. 

*MUSIC 372-Music History. (3-0-3). Alternate years. Pre- 
requisite: One year of music theory, or permission of the instructor. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Baroque and 
Classic periods. Equivalent substitute at Savannah State College: 
Music 315. 

*MUSIC 373-Music History. (3-0-3). Alternate years. Pre- 
requisite: Music 213 or permission of the instructor. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Romantic 
Period and in the 20th century. Equivalent substitute at Savannah 
State College: Music 316. 

MUSIC 381— Conducting. (3-0-3). Alternate years. Prerequisite: 
Music 113. 

An introduction to the techniques of conducting and interpre- 
tation. Equivalent substitute at Savannah State College: Music 407. 

MUSIC 411— Composition. (1 to 5 hours). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisites: Music 213, 312. 

MUSIC 412— Counterpoint. (3-0-3). Offered on demand. Pre- 
requisite: Music 213. 

A study of contrapuntal practices of the Renaissance, Baroque and 
20th century music. 

MUSIC 418-419-Repertoire of the Principal Instrument. (2-0-2) 
(2-0-2). Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of the instructor. 
Survey of the literature for the principal instrument. 

MUSIC 420-Principal Instrument Pedagogy. (2-0-2). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Junior status or Permission of Instructor. 

An introduction to techniques of instruction of the principal 
instrument from the elementary through the advanced levels. 

MUSIC 421-Principal Instrument Pedagogy. (2-0-2). 
A continuation of Music 420. 

MUSIC 422— Opera Literature. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. Pre- 
requisites: Music 371, 372, 373 or permission of the instructor. 

A study of operatic masterpieces from the origins of the form to 
the present. 



♦Offered only at Savannah State College during 1974-1975. 
168 






MUSIC 451— Music in the Church. (2-0-2). Prerequisites: Music 
371,372,373. 

A study of the historical development of sacred music in Western 
culture from the early Christian period to the present. 

MUSIC 490— Directed Individual Study. (1 to 5 hours). 

Applied Music Courses 

To receive credit towards satisfaction of the applied music 
requirement in the music program a student should have met the 
entrance requirements for proficiency in his principal instrument. 
Credit in a secondary instrument may not be used to satisfy this 
requirement. 

In the following system, replacing the third digit by a letter (A, B, 
C) indicates credit in a secondary instrument. 

Music 131, 132, 133; 231, 232, 233; 331, 332, 333; 431, 432, 
433— Applied Music. One twenty-five minute private lesson per week. 
One hour credit per quarter. 

Music 141, 142, 143; 241, 242, 243; 341, 342, 343; 441, 442, 
443— Applied Music. One fifty minute lesson per week. Two hours 
credit per quarter. 

Applied Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five minute 
private lessons per week. A special fee of $31.00 for one twenty-five 
minute lesson or $62.00 for two lessons is charged quarterly to 
students not admitted to a music degree program and to music 
majors not enrolled for ten or more quarter hours of credit. This fee 
is refundable only when the student has not met his first lesson. 



FRENCH 
(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 

GEOGRAPHY 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science.) 

GERMAN 

(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 



169 



HEALTH 
(See listing under Department of Physical Education.) 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Roger K. Warlick, Head; Professors Beecher, Coyle, and 
Lanier; Associate Professors Clark, Duncan, Gross, McCarthy, and 
Newman; Assistant Professors Boney, Comaskey, and Patterson. 



All students are reminded that any who receive degrees from the 
University System of Georgia are required to demonstrate pro- 
ficiency in U. S. and Georgia History and Constitutions. This 
requirement may be met by the successful completion of Political 
Science 113 and History 251 or 252 or may be exempted by 
examination with credit awarded. See "Academic Regulations" and 
"Degree Programs" sections. 

A major in Political Science or History is most useful to those who 
plan to enter teaching, library or archival work, publishing, journal- 
ism, or such professional fields as international business, law or 
theology. Either major is also a desirable foundation for opportuni- 
ties in or related to government (e.g., civil and foreign service, A.I.D., 
U.S. I. A., ACTION, teaching abroad, etc.). Beyond these fields there 
is an enormous variety of organizations (local, national, and 
international) whose philanthropic, sectarian, or economic interests 
require people with the skills and sensitivity developed by a major in 
History or Political Science. 

The Major in History 

Students majoring in History should satisfy the college core 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman 
and Sophomore years. To complete the major requires, beyond 
Western Civilization (History 114-115) and U. S. History (History 
251-252), forty quarter hours from courses numbered 300 or above 
(with grades of "C" or better) including History 300. Students 
should register for History 300 in the Sophomore or early in the 
Junior year, or in the first possible quarter after making the decision 
to major in History. The major program must also include pro- 
ficiency in a foreign language through the 201 level and 25 quarter 
hours above the Sophomore level in related fields such as: Anthro- 
pology, History of Art and Music, Economics, Literature, Political 
Science, Philosophy, or Sociology. 



170 



In selecting coursework, a student may emphasize the history of 
one particular area or cultural tradition, but may not present a major 
exclusively in only one of these areas. 

The program for Secondary Teaching in History, with its 
distinctive requirements, is outlined in detail in the section on 
"Teacher Education." 

Course Offerings 

HISTORY 

HISTORY 114— History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

A chronological survey of the main currents of political, social, 
religious, and intellectual activity in western civilization from the 
time of the ancient Mediterranean civilization to 1715. 

HISTORY 115-History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

A continuation of History 114 to the present. 

HISTORY 180-The African Experience. (5-0-5). Offered on 
Demand. 

A one quarter survey designed to introduce the important themes, 
concepts, and perspectives of African civilization. Examines African 
societies and cultures, major historical forces, the processes of social 
change, and Africa and the modern world. 

HISTORY 191-Honors Civilization I. (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course replaces History 114 for selected students. While the 
subject matter will be the same as for History 114, the treatment of 
it will vary greatly. Likewise, instruction will go beyond the usual 
lecture method, allowing students to read widely and carry out their 
own research under the direction of the professor. 

HISTORY 192-Honors Civilization II. (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: History 191 or a grade of "A" in History 114. 

A continuation of History 191, this course replaces History 115. 

HISTORY 251-American History to 1865. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the 
United States to the end of the Civil War. 

HISTORY 252-American History Since 1865. (5-0-5). Offered 
each quarter. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the 
United States from 1865 to the present. 

HISTORY 300-Historical Method. (3-0-5). Fall. Required of all 
History majors. 

171 



An introduction to the nature and method of historical research, 
treating problems of investigation, organization, and writing through 
discussion and actual research experience in local history. 

HISTORY 320— The Civilization of China and the Far East, Part 

I. (5-0-5). Fall. 

The history of East Asia civilization from ancient times through 
the eighteenth century, with emphasis on characteristic political, 
economic, and social developments. 

HISTORY 321-The Civilization of China and the Far East, Part 

II. (5-0-5). Winter. 

The history of East Asian nations from the nineteenth century to 
the present, with emphasis on political, social, economic, and 
intellectual developments. 

HISTORY 322— History of Japan. (5-0-5). Spring. 
A survey of the history of Japan, with major emphasis placed 
upon the development of Japan since 1600. 

HISTORY 323-History of India and South Asia. (5-0-5). Winter. 
A survey of the civilization of South Asia, with principal attention 
given to India and Pakistan since 1600. 

HISTORY 329— History of Russia to 1917. (5-0-5). Spring. 
A survey of Russian history during the Kievan, Tartar, Muscovite, 
and Imperial eras. 

HISTORY 330— Twentieth Century Russia. (5-0-5). Alternate 
Years. 

An examination of the forces leading to the downfall of Tsarist 
Russia, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the political, economic, and 
social history of the Soviet era. 

HISTORY 333-Modern Germany; 1789-1933. (5-0-5). Offered 
on Demand. 

A study of Germany from the pluralism of the Holy Roman 
Empire through the German confederation to the unified Reich. 
Attention will be given to political, social, and cultural developments 
in Austria, Prussia, and the "Third Germany." 

HISTORY 340-English History, 1660-1815. (5-0-5). Winter. 
Alternate Years. 

An investigation of the Restoration monarchies, the constitutional 
revolution of 1688, the rise of ministerial responsibility in the early 
18th century, the American colonial revolt, and England's relation- 
ship to the French Revolution. 

HISTORY 341-English History 1485-1660. (5-0-5). Fall. 
Alternate Years. 

An analysis of political, constitutional, economic, and religious 
issues under the Tudors and early Stuarts, including the English Civil 
War. 



172 



HISTORY 342— Ancient History. (5-0-5). Offered on Demand. 

A study of the early civilizations of the Middle East, the Greek 
city states, the Roman republic and empire, with special emphasis on 
the social, political and cultural contributions of these ancient 
peoples. 

HISTORY 343-Early Middle Ages, A.D. 333 - c.1000. (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through 
the Carolingian period with special emphasis on the institutional 
developments which led to the emergence of stable kingdoms out of 
the chaos of the barbarian invasions. 

HISTORY 344-The High Middle Ages, c.1000 to c.1300. (5-0-5). 
Winter. 

The history of Europe from c.1000 to c.1300 with emphasis on 
the struggle between church and state, the Crusade movement, and 
the 12th century intellectual renaissance, all of which profoundly 
influenced the development of the various medieval kingdoms. 

HISTORY 345-The Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Alternate Years. 

The history of Europe from c.1300 to 1517 with emphasis on the 
political, cultural, and intellectual developments which transformed 
medieval and Renaissance society. 

HISTORY 346-Reformation Era. (5-0-5). Winter. Alternate 
Years. 

A study of the controversial era emphasizing its major issues and 
movements, and their development through the Thirty Years War. 
Political, social, and economic, as well as religious facets of the 
upheaval will be considered. 

HISTORY 347-The French Revolution and Napoleon. (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
France, with emphasis on the impact of the French Revolution and 
the career of Napoleon upon the major European nations. 

HISTORY 348-The History of Europe from 1815 to 1900. 
(5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of the most important social, political, and intellectual 
directions of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the 
end of the nineteenth century. 

HISTORY 349-Absolutism and The Enlightenment. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Alternate Years. 

The primary focus of this course is the social and intellectual 
history of western Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. 

HISTORY 350-Europe in the Twentieth Century. (5-0-5). 
Spring. 

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A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World 
Wars. 

HISTORY 351— Social and Intellectual History of the United 
States to 1865. (5-0-5). Alternate Years. Prerequisite: History 251. 

An examination of political theory, social development, and the 
principal trends in American thought to 1865. 

HISTORY 354— Social and Intellectual History of the United 
States since 1865. (5-0-5). Alternate Years. Prerequisite: History 
252. 

A continuation of History 351 to the present. 

HISTORY 356— American Constitutional History. (5-0-5). Fall. 
A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution 
of the United States. 

HISTORY 365— The American Indian. (5-0-5). Spring. Alternate 
Years. 

A study of the history and cultures of the aborigines of the 
Americas. 

HISTORY 367— American Urban History. (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study of the process of urbanization in America from colonial 
times to the present, with attention to the causes of urban 
expansion, institutional development, class structure and mobility, 
problems of the city, reform, the image of the city in popular 
thought, and the impact of urbanization on national life. 

HISTORY 371— Colonial and Revolutionary America. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Alternate Years. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement 
and growth of the English colonies of North America, the American 
triumph over France in the New World, the drastic change in British 
colonial policy and the rise of American opposition to it, the 
achievement of independence and the establishment of the United 
States under the Constitution. 

HISTORY 373-The Middle Period of American History. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Alternate Years. 

The political, economic, and cultural development of the Republic 
from 1820 to the decade of the 1850's, with particular attention to 
Jacksonian Democracy, slavery and abolitionism, and the impact of 
westward expansion. 

HISTORY 375-Civil War and Reconstruction. (5-0-5). Winter. 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with minor 
consideration of the military campaign; political, economic and 
social aspects of Reconstruction. 

HISTORY 376— Foundations of Modern America. (5-0-5). Winter. 
Alternate Years. 

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An analysis of institutions and forces which molded American life 
in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including politics, 
economics, society, and thought. 

HISTORY 378-Recent American History. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Alternate Years. 

The course covers twentieth century American History, with 
emphasis on political, economic, and social issues. 

HISTORY 381-History of Tropical Africa I. (5-0-5). Offered on 
Demand. 

Introduces the basic historical themes of tropical Africa, including 
the peopling of the continent, Iron Age cultures, growth of African 
kingdoms and states, spread of Islam, and the beginnings of 
Euro-African contact. 

HISTORY 382-History of Tropical Africa II. (5-0-5). Offered on 
Demand. 

An examination of the major social, political, and economic 
factors contributing to the growth of modern Africa: the Islamic 
revolutions, trade, the politics in West and East Africa, the European 
conquest and African reaction, and colonial rule and the African 
voice. 

HISTORY 395-396-397-Internship. (credit variable, 5-15 hours). 

Open to students accepted by the Georgia Intern Program. The 
student will pursue an individually designed course project involving 
off-campus study and research in a government or private agency for 
which he will receive a stipend. Projects are normally designed to 
require the full eleven week quarter for completion, during which 
time the student will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring 
agency and his faculty advisor. Credit arrangements must be made 
through the department. 

HISTORY 400— Seminar in American History. (5-0-5). Permission 
of instructor required for admission. 

Designed to permit a group of advanced students to pursue 
intensive research on a special topic in the field to be defined by the 
instructor. 

HISTORY 410— Seminar in European History. (5-0-5). Permission 
of instructor required for admission. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in European history by 
examination of primary materials. 

HISTORY 454-Studies in American Diplomacy I. (5-0-5). Fall. 
Prerequisite: History 251, or equivalent. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from 
colonial times to 1890. 

HISTORY 455-Studies in American Diplomacy II. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: History 252, or equivalent. 
A continuation of History 454 to the present. 

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HISTORY 483-The African Revolution: Nationalism and In- 
dependence. (5-0-5). Offered on Demand. 

An examination of the growth of African nationalism and 
emergence of independent states in the twentieth century. Examines 
the problems of modernization, military coups, white Africa, and 
African liberation movements. 

HISTORY 485-History of South Africa. (5-0-5). Offered on 
Demand. 

Considers the major themes of conflict and interdependence in 
South Africa with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth 
century. Includes a discussion of the racial policies of white Africa 
and African nationalism in southern Africa. 

HISTORY 490-491-492-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). 
Offered each quarter. 

Admission by approval of instructor and the Head of the 
Department. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research 
and reading in some field of history under the supervision of a 
member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences 
with the advisor, and written reports and essays. Normally open only 
to seniors with a B average in History and in their overall work. 

HISTORY 495-European Historiography. (5-0-5). Fall. Alternate 
Years. 

A study of the writers of history in the Western cultural tradition, 
with an emphasis on the historical philosophies, interpretations, and 
problems raised by the major modern European historians. Recom- 
mended especially to students contemplating graduate work in 
History. 

HISTORY 496-American Historiography. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Alternate Years. 

A study of the writing of American history from colonial times to 
the present with emphasis on the historical philosophies and 
interpretations of the major schools of thought as well as individual 
historians. Recommended especially to students contemplating 
graduate work in History. 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEOGRAPHY Ill-World Human Geography. (5-0-5). 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 
ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 



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POLITICAL SCIENCE 

All students are reminded that any who receive degrees from the 
University System of Georgia are required to demonstrate pro- 
ficiency in U. S. and Georgia History and Constitutions. This 
requirement may be met by the successful completion of Political 
Science 113 and History 251 or 252 or may be exempted by 
examination with credit awarded. See "Academic Regulations" and 
"Degree Programs" sections. 

The Major in Political Science 

Students majoring in Political Science should satisfy the college 
core requirements for the Bachelor of Arts during their Freshman 
and Sophomore years. To complete a Political Science major 
requires, beyond American Government (113), forty quarter hours 
of upper division courses in the field (with grades of "C" or better). 
Further, the program must include at least one course from each of 
the following groups: 

I. American Political Institutions 

(300, 304, 305, 317, 411, 414) 
II. International Relations (320, 325, 326, 329) 

III. Political Theory (331, 332, 333) 

IV. Comparative Government (340, 345, 348, 349) 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language through 201-level (French or German is recommended for 
those contemplating graduate work), Mathematics 220, and 25 
quarter hours of coursework in such related fields as: Economics, 
History, Geography, Mathematics, Philosophy, Psychology, or 
Sociology. 

The program for Secondary Teaching in Political Science, with its 
distinctive requirements, is outlined in detail in the section on 
"Teacher Education". 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 113-Government of the United States. 
(5-0-5). Offered each quarter. 

A study of the structure, theory, and functions of the national 
government in the United States and some of the major problems of 
the state and local government. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 200-Introduction to Political Science. 
(5-0-5). Winter. 

This course deals with the area of political science as a discipline 
and serves as an introduction to the systematic study of modern 
government. Attention is given to the role of politics in society; the 
nature and origins of the state; the nature and development of 
political institutions; the basis of political action; and the theories, 
forms, and processes of government. 

177 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 300-Political Behavior. (5-0-5). FaU. Pre- 
requisites: Political Science 113 and Mathematics 220 or equivalent. 

This course emphasizes the economic, psychological, and social 
aspects of political behavior. It examines the concepts of power, 
roles, groups, elites, decision-making, political communications, and 
systems analysis. Consideration is also given to the basic theories, 
variables, and hypotheses used in empirical research in political 
science. Designed primarily for those students intending to go to 
graduate school. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 304-Public Administration. (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 

This is a one-quarter course that is primarily concerned with 
organizational theory and bureaucratic behavior, whether public or 
private, but with an emphasis on the behavior of the bureaucracy of 
the national government. Attention will also be given the political 
process as it unfolds in the administration of laws enacted by the 
Congress. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 305— State and Local Government. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 

This course is concerned primarily with the political process and 
the behavior of political actors at the local and state levels of 
government in the United States. It is concerned with the techniques 
and research results of the relevant empirical literature that has 
evolved over the past 15 years in the field; i.e., local community 
studies of Floyd Hunter, Robert A. Dahl, and others. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 317-Constitutional Law. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 

A study of the development of the United States government 
through judicial interpretation of the Constitution. The case study 
method of analysis is used, but some attention is given also to recent 
behavioral writing on judicial decision-making. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 320-International Relations: The Far 
East. (5-0-5). Spring. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 325-International Organization. (5-0-5). 
Fall. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the development, principles, structure and functions 
of international organizations, with emphasis upon the role of these 
institutions in the maintenance of peace. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 326-International Law. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to selected public international law topics 
including: recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, 
nationality, the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the law of 
war. 



178 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 329-International Relations. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating 
contemporary international relations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 331— Political Theory I. (5-0-5). Fall. 

An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the 
state and government from Socrates and Plato to the Seventeenth 
Century. Attention is directed primarily to the political thought of a 
selected group of eminent philosophers. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 332-Political Theory II. (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of Political Science 331, from the 17th to the 20th 
century. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 333— Contemporary Political Ideologies. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Political Science 332 or permission of 
instructor. 

A continuation of Political Science 332, including a general survey 
and analysis of the important ideological currents of our time with 
selected in-depth readings from original sources. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 340— Comparative Political Analysis. 
(5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or its 
equivalent. 

This course is mainly theoretical. It deals with the various 
approaches, concepts, and methodologies that are being used in the 
analysis of comparative politics, viz: the traditional approach 
(formal-legal), group theory of politics, systems analysis, structural- 
functional analysis, communications theory, decision-making theory, 
game theory, etc. Each approach is examined and used in comparing 
the politics of various countries. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 345-African Politics. (5-0-5). Offered on 
Demand. 

Designed to introduce students to African politics, this course is 
divided into three parts covering: the colonial period, examining 
British, French, Belgian, and Portuguese rule; African governments 
immediately after independence; and the transition to military rule 
in some countries. Problems common to the key independent 
countries (e.g., Nigeria, Ghana, Tanzania, Zaire) are examined and 
also the National Liberation movements in Southern Rhodesia, 
South Africa, and the Portuguese colonies. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 348--Comparative Government: Western 
Europe. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equiva- 
lent. 

An analytical and comparative study of the major Western 
European governments, with principal emphasis upon the analysis of 
the conditions which led to effective and stable parliamentary 

179 



government and those which lead to the inefficiency, instability and 
breakdown of such systems. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 349-Comparative Government: Soviet 
Union. (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or 
equivalent. 

An analytical and comparative study of the political system of the 
U.S.S.R. and the Soviet bloc of nations in Eastern Europe. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 395-396-397— Internship, (credit variable, 
5-15 hours). 

Open to students accepted by the Georgia Intern Program. The 
student will pursue an individually designed course project involving 
off-campus study and research in a government or private agency for 
which he will receive a stipend. Projects are normally designed to 
require the full eleven week quarter for completion, during which 
time the student will be under joint supervision by the sponsoring 
agency and his faculty advisor. Credit arrangements must be made 
through the department. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 400— Senior Seminar. (5-0-5). Admission 
will be subject to approval of the instructor. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue research and 
reading in some field of political science under the supervision of the 
staff. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 411-The American Presidency. (5-0-5). 
Offered on Demand. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the Presidency, with the 
principal emphasis on the relations of the executive branch with the 
Congress and the Court system. Some attention will be given to the 
evolution of the Presidency to its present dominant position in the 
American political process. (Completion of a survey course in 
American History is desirable). 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 414-The American Congress. (5-0-5). 
Offered on Demand. Prerequisite: Political Science 113, or 
equivalent. 

A detailed study of the legislative process in the national 
government with particular emphasis on executive - legislative 
relations. Some comparisons will be made with the law-making 
processes of other nations. (Some background in American political 
and social history is desirable.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 490-49 1-492-Independent Study. 
(l-5)-0-(l-5). Offered each quarter. Admission by approval of 
instructor and the Head of the Department. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research 
and reading in some field of history under the supervision of a 
member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences 
with the advisor and written reports and essays. Normally open only 



180 



to seniors with a B average in Political Science and in their overall 
work. 

JOURNALISM 

(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 

DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Professor Hugh Pendexter, III, Head; Professors Anchors, Easter- 
ling, Killorin, Lubs, Seale, Strozier; Associate Professor Jones; 
Assistant Professors Brooks, Brown, Harris, Jenkins, Lawson, Noble, 
Ramsey, Suchower, Welsh, and White. 

Entering students should begin the required English composition 
sequence no later than the second quarter of their attendance. By 
doing so, the student will have had the opportunity to complete the 
required sequence prior to his taking the University System Rising 
Junior English Examination. 

Students enrolled in degree programs which require a foreign 
language must show proficiency in the appropriate language at the 
required level by successfully completing standardized examinations 
administered by members of the foreign language faculty in the 
Department of Languages and Literature. This requirement applies to 
students enrolled at Armstrong State College and taking their foreign 
language courses on this campus and to students who, while enrolled 
at Armstrong State College, take their foreign language courses on 
another campus. Students transferring to Armstrong State College, 
after having completed the required foreign language sequence at 
another college, are not required to complete the proficiency 
examinations at Armstrong. 

Entering freshmen who wish to exempt the foreign language 
requirement may do so by successfully completing the proficiency 
examination through the level required in a specific degree program. 
For further information on the exemption process, the student 
should contact the Head of the Department of Languages and 
Literature. 



Departmental Requirements for the 
Major in English 

A student majoring in English must complete at least 40 hours of 
upper-division courses (300-400 level) in the major field, of which at 
least 15 hours must be on the 400-level. A major program must 
include at least one of the starred courses in each of the following 
groups: 

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I. Shakespeare (404*) 

II. English Literature before 1660 (300*, 301*, 302*, 320*, 402, 
403) 

III. English Literature after 1660 (303*, 304*, 305*, 306*, 307*, 
311,312,316,322). 

IV. American Literature (308*, 309*, 310*, 313, 315, 322). 
V. a. English Language (324*, 325*, 410*) or 

b. Comparative Literature (314*, 317*, 318*, 332*, 333*, or 
English 322*) or 

c. Speech (for Speech majors) (341*, 345*, 346*; 400, 450). 

The major shall select one area of specialization from groups II- V 
and complete at least two additional courses in that area (starred or 
unstarred). English 400, 401, 490, and 491 may, depending on the 
subject, be counted in any area of specialization. 

The major program must also include proficiency in foreign 
language equivalent to the level achieved on completion of 201 as 
demonstrated on an examination to be designated by the de- 
partment, and 25 hours of approved courses on the 300 or 
400 level from these related fields: literature in a foreign 
language, history, philosophy, art, music, speech. Those con- 
centrating in speech should include among their related-field 
courses Speech 227 (5 hours) or Speech 450 (15 hours) 
and Speech 228 and two courses in dramatic literature either in 
English or in a foreign language. Students concentrating in compara- 
tive literature should take as many of their related field courses as 
possible in foreign literature in the original language. 

Unless exempted by examination, each student must complete a 
course in United States history. 

Departmental Requirements for the 
Major in French 

A student majoring in French must complete at least 40 quarter 
hours of French beyond French 300. This program includes 
successful completion of one quarter's study (15 quarter hours) in 
France with the University System of Georgia Study Abroad 
Program. The department reserves the right to test a returning 
student on any or all material covered during the student's quarter in 
France. "Material covered" includes information a student should 
have acquired in scheduled museum visits or other field trips, 
geography of France, and any other information which might be 
included under the heading of general culture. 



182 



An additional thirty quarter hours are required in a related area. It 
is recommended that related courses be taken from the following: 

1. Literature in a language other than French. This would include 
English, American, foreign or comparative literature. In the 
case of foreign literature, it is strongly recommended that the 
courses be taken in the original language. 

2. History. It is naturally recommended that the bulk of courses 
be taken in French and European history. 

3. Foreign language other than French, preferably a non-Romance 
language, plus courses in linguistics, such as English 410. 

Unless exempted by examination, each student must include in his 
program of studies a course in United States history. 

Departmental Requirements for a Major in English 
With a Concentration in Speech 

The following is a statement of policy on departmental require- 
ments for the major in English with a concentration in Speech. 

A student majoring in English with a concentration in Speech 
must complete at least 65 hours of course work as outlined below. 
The major program must also include proficiency in foreign language 
equivalent to courses 101 through 201. 

Quarter Hours 

I. Required English courses 20 hours 

English 404 - Shakespeare 

English 322 - Modern British, American, and Continental 

Drama: Ibsen to the present 
English 320 - British Drama: Beginnings to 1640 
Comparative Literature 318 - Ancient Drama 

II. At least one course from the following group 5 hours 

English 324 - Introduction to Linguistics 

English 325 - Advanced Grammar: Generative-Transformational 

Grammar 
English 410 - History of the English Language 

III. Required Speech courses 25 hours 

Speech 227 - Theatre Laboratory (5 quarters) 
Speech 228 - Fundamentals of Speech 
Speech 341 - Oral Interpretation 
Speech 345 - History of the Theatre 
Speech 346 - Play Production 

183 



Quarter Hours 

IV. At least one course from the following group 5 hours 

English 490 - Independent Study 

Speech 400 - Special Topics 

English 400 or 401 (depending on the subject) 

V. Electives: at least two additional courses 

in related fields 10 hours 

or Speech 450 - Drama Workshop (15 hours) 

Course Offerings 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 314-Continental Novel. (5-0-5). 
Offered 1974-75. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 317-Ancient Epic and Lyric. 
(5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 318-Ancient Drama. (5-0-5). 
Offered 1973-74. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 332— Medieval and Renaissance 
Continental Literature. (5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 333-Modern Continental 
Literature. (5-0-5). Offered 1973-74. 

ENGLISH 

Students will be assigned to freshman English classes according to 
results of diagnostic tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

ENGLISH 110— English as a Second Language (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. 

This course is designed to prepare the student whose native 
language is not English to do the normal college composition work. 
Students who pass this course are eligible for English 122. Admission 
by permission of the instructor. 

ENGLISH 121— Composition and Non-Fiction. (5-0-5). Offered 
every quarter. 

Assignment to this course is based upon the results of the English 
Department's placement test or upon the successful completion of 
English 99. The instruction focuses upon rhetoric, organization of 
ideas, and techniques of reading. 

ENGLISH 122— Composition and Introduction to Prose Fiction. 
(5-0-5). Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: English 121, English 
110, or English 191. 



184 



ENGLISH 191-Honors Composition. (5-0-5). Fall. 

Instruction in this course will not follow the traditional lecture 
method only; the student will read widely and write a research paper 
(or papers) in the fashion which the instructor thinks will best 
discipline him for independent study. This course replaces English 
121 for selected students. 

ENGLISH 192— Honors Composition and Introduction to Litera- 
ture. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: English 103 or a grade of "A" in English 
121. Winter. 

In this course the students will read more extensively than for 
English 122 and will write critical papers. 

ENGLISH 221— Composition and Introduction to Poetry and 
Drama. (5-0-5). Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: English 122 or 
English 192. 

This course is prerequisite to all 300 and 400-level courses in 
English and Comparative Literature. 

ENGLISH 222— Literature and the Human Condition. (5-0-5). 
Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: English 221. 

A course ordered around one or all of these questions: (1) man's 
nature, needs and goals; (2) his place in nature; (3) his relationship to 
human society. The works read may investigate in depth one point of 
view on these questions or may explore several contrasting view- 
points. The student will be asked to order and express, at least 
tentatively, his own views. No term or research paper required. 

ENGLISH 300— Early English Literature: Beginnings through 
1485. (5-0-5). Offered Fall, 1974. 

ENGLISH 301-Renaissance 1485-1603. (5-0-5). Offered 
1974-1975. 

ENGLISH 302-17th Century: 1603-1660. (5-0-5). Offered 
Summer, 1974. 

ENGLISH 303-Restoration. (5-0-5). Offered Spring, 1975. 

ENGLISH 304-18th Century. (5-0-5). Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 305-19th Century I: Romantic. (5-0-5). Offered 
1974-75. 

ENGLISH 306-19th Century II: Victorian. (5-0-5). Offered 
1974-75. 

ENGLISH 307-20th Century British. (5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

ENGLISH 308— American I: Beginnings through Cooper. (3-0-3). 
Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 309-American II: Emerson through Twain. (5-0-5). 
Offered 1975-76. 



185 



ENGLISH 310— American III: Rise of Naturalism to the present. 
(5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

ENGLISH 311— British Novel I: Beginnings through Austen. 
(3-0-3). Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 312-British Novel II: Scott through Hardy. (5-0-5). 
Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 316— British Novel III: Conrad through present. 
(5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

ENGLISH 313— American Novel I: Beginnings through James. 
(5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

ENGLISH 315— American Novel II: Naturalists to present. 
(5-0-5). Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 320— British Drama: Beginnings to 1640. (5-0-5). 
Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 322— Modern British, American, and Continental 
Drama: Ibsen to the present. (5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 

ENGLISH 324— Introduction to Linguistics. (5-0-5). Offered Fall, 
1975. 

ENGLISH 325— Advanced Grammar: Generative-Transforma- 
tional Grammar. (5-0-5). Prerequisites: English 324 or Speech 228. 
Winter. 

ENGLISH 329— Introduction to Literary Research and Writing. 
(2-0-2). Offered on Demand. 

A course intended to increase the student's skill in gathering 
research materials and using bibliographies, to improve the style and 
mechanics of his scholarly papers, and to familiarize him with 
literary terminology. Highly recommended for those majors who 
plan to teach or enter graduate school. 

ENGLISH 331— Children's Literature (does not apply toward 
English major). (5-0-5). Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 340— Advanced Composition. (5-0-5). Offered on 
demand. 

The study of expository and report techniques. Prerequisite: 
English 221 or consent of instructor (does not apply toward English 
major). 

ENGLISH 342— Creative Writing. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: English 
222 or consent of instructor. Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 400-Seminar. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 401-Seminar. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 402-Milton. (5-0-5). Spring, 1975. 



186 



ENGLISH 403-Chaucer. (5-0-5). Offered 1975-76. 

ENGLISH 404-Shakespeare. (5-0-5). Fall. 

ENGLISH 410-History of the English Language. (5-0-5). Offered 
Spring. 1974. 

ENGLISH 490-Independent Study. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Senior Status and English 221. 

ENGLISH 491-Independent Study. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Senior Status and English 221. 

SPEECH 

SPEECH 227-Theatre Laboratory. (0-3-1). Offered every 
quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student will work on the 
Masquers' production of the quarter. Only one hour of credit may be 
earned per quarter. The maximum total credit allowed in Theatre 
Laboratory is five quarter hours. 

In the summer students may take up to five hours credit in Speech 
227 by working part-time in summer theatre workshop (Speech 
450). 

SPEECH 228— Fundamentals of Speech. (5-0-5) Prerequisite: 
English 121. Offered every quarter. 

Practice and theory of oral communication. Each student makes 
several major speeches. The physiology of the speech mechanism is 
covered, and articulation is studied within the framework of the 
International Phonetic Alphabet. 

SPEECH 341— Oral Interpretation. (5-0-5). Offered 1975-76. Pre- 
requisite: English 121. 

A practical course in the oral interpretation of poetry and prose. 
The techniques of literary analysis are stressed along with the vocal 
techniques needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning. 

SPEECH 345-History of the Theatre. (5-0-5). Offered 1974-75. 
Prerequisite: English 121. 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginning to the present day. 
The course emphasizes the development of the physical theatre. 

SPEECH 346-Play Production. (5-0-5). Spring Prerequisite: 
English 121. 

A course in the theory and practice of acting and directing, with 
special attention to image-making on stage. Individuals under 
supervision prepare and execute the production of scenes and short 
plays. 

SPEECH 400-Special Topics. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). 
The specific subject matter in this course will be determined and 
announced by the professor at the time when the course is offered. 

187 



SPEECH 450— Drama Workshop. (0-45-15). Offered in summer 
only. 

This course is summer stock theatre for credit. Students will be 
directed and instructed by a member of the faculty who is a 
professional in the theatre. All aspects of production will be 
included. 



PHILOSOPHY 

PHILOSOPHY 201-Introduction to Philosophy. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisite: English 121. 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the 
relation of philosophy to art, science, and religion. Includes a survey 
of the basic issues and major types of philosophy and shows their 
sources in experience, history, and representative thinkers. 

PHILOSOPHY 301— History of Philosophy: Ancient and 
Medieval. (5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 121. 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development 
of European philosophy from the early Greeks through the Middle 
Ages, with emphasis on selected works of major philosophers. 

PHILOSOPHY 302-History of Philosophy: Modem (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 121. 

European philosophy from the Renaissance through Kant, em- 
phasizing selected works of major philosophers. 

PHILOSOPHY 303-19th and 20th Century Philosophy. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 201, 301, or 302; English 121. Offered on 
demand. 

A study of the major philosophers in philosophical movements of 
the 19th and 20th centuries. 

PHILOSOPHY 320-Introduction to Oriental Philosophy. (5-0-5). 
Offered on Demand. Prerequisite: English 121. 

PHILOSOPHY 400-Special Topics. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: English 121. 

The specific subject matter in this course will be determined and 
announced by the professor at the time when the course is offered. 

PHILOSOPHY 490-Independent Study. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisites: Senior Status and English 121. 

The student, with the advice and consent of his supervising 
professor and of the department head, will select the topic for 
supervised independent study and will submit a prospectus for 
departmental approval before the quarter in which the course is to be 
taken. 



188 



JOURNALISM 

JOURNALISM 227-Journalism Laboratory. (0-3-1). Offered on 
demand. 

Practical experience in journalism. Students will work under 
instruction on the college newspaper staff. Only one hour's credit 
may be earned per quarter. The maximum total credit allowed in 
Journalism Laboratory is five quarter hours. Admission by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

FRENCH 

FRENCH 101-102-103-Elementary French. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 
(5-0-5). Offered each year. 

A course for beginners. The approach is primarily oral, and daily 
practice with tape recordings is required.* 

To receive credit for French 103, a student must successfully 
complete the Modern Language Association L level test in French. 

FRENCH 201-Intermediate French. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
three quarters of college French or three years of high school French. 

Further reading of texts, and oral and composition practice. 

To receive credit for French 201, a student must successfully 
complete the Educational Testing Service College Placement Test in 
French. 

FRENCH 300— Composition and Conversation. (5-0-5). Winter. 

FRENCH 301— French Literature of the Middle Ages and the 
Renaissance. (5-0-5). Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: French 
201. 

FRENCH 302— French Classical Drama. (5-0-5). Offered alternate 
years. Prerequisite: French 201. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 

FRENCH 304— French Literature of the 19th Century. (5-0-5). 
Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: French 201. 

A study of Romantic prose, poetry, and drama, with lectures and 
discussions in French. 

FRENCH 305— French Literature of the 19th Century: Realism 
and Naturalism. (5-0-5). Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: French 
201. 

FRENCH 351-352-353— Study Abroad in France (15 hours 
credit). Prerequisite: French 103. 

This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in France in 
conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University 
System of Georgia. The program is offered in Dijon for a period of 

*Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of the 
library. These tapes are recorded at 7-% i.p.s. 

189 



nine weeks. During this time the student will receive intensive 
instruction in language and culture and will be expected to engage in 
co-curricular activities sponsored by the University of Dijon and 
USG. 

FRENCH 401— French Literature of the Twentieth Century. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: French 201. 

This course is a study of contemporary prose, poetry, and drama 
with lectures and discussions in French. This course, normally the 
last course in French that a student would take, includes a serious 
term paper of considerable magnitude to be written in French. 

FRENCH 490-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Senior Status and French 201. 

GERMAN 

GERMAN 101-102-103-Elementary German. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 
(5-0-5). Offered each year. 

Elements of reading and writing; basic vocabulary; simple conver- 
sation; essentials of grammar.* 

To receive credit for German 103, a student must successfully 
complete the Modern Language Association L Level test in German. 

GERMAN 201— Intermediate German. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Three quarters of college German or three years of high school 
German. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

To receive credit for German 201, a student must successfully 
complete the Educational Testing Service College Placement Test in 
German. 

GERMAN 211— Scientific German. (3-0-3). Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: same as 201. 

Readings in scientific and technical material with special attention 
to grammatical difficulties encountered in this literature. 

GERMAN 300— Composition and Conversation. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. Prerequisite: German 201. 

GERMAN 302— German Literature of the Twentieth Century. 
(5-0-5). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: German 201. 

GERMAN 304-19th Century German Literature. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: German 201. 

GERMAN 351-352-353— Study Abroad in Germany. (15 hours 
credit). Prerequisite: German 103. 



♦Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of the 
library. These tapes are recorded at l- x k i.p.s. 

190 



This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in Germany 
in conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University 
System of Georgia. The program is offered in Germany for a period 
of nine weeks. During this time the student will receive intensive 
instruction in language and culture and will participate in University 
sponsored activities. 

GERMAN 490-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisite: Senior Status and German 201. 

SPANISH 

SPANISH 101-102-103-Elementary Spanish. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 
(5-0-5). Offered each year. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition, and conversation.* 

To receive credit for Spanish 103, a student must successfully 
complete the Modern Language Association L level test in Spanish. 

SPANISH 201— Intermediate Spanish. (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Three quarters of college Spanish or three years of high school 
Spanish. 

Further reading of texts and oral and composition practice. 

To receive credit for Spanish 201, a student must successfully 
complete the Educational Testing Service College Placement Test in 
Spanish. 

SPANISH 300— Composition and Conversation. (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 201. 

SPANISH 351-352-353-Study Abroad in Spain (15 hours credit.) 
Prerequisite: Spanish 103. 

This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in Spain in 
conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University 
System of Georgia. The program is offered in Salamance for a period 
of nine weeks. During this time the students will receive intensive 
instruction in language and culture which will be complemented by a 
number of excursions. 

SPANISH 490-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). Offered on 
demand. Prerequisites: Senior Status and Spanish 201. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Assistant Professor George Sloan, Director; 

Assistant Professors Ball, Hughes, Miller, Prantalos, Sandy. 

(See listing under Department of Education.) 



*Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of the 
library. These tapes are recorded at 744 i.p.s. 

191 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Professor Richard M. Summerville, Head; Professors Hudson and 
Winn (Emeritus); Associate Professor Hinkel; Assistant Professors 
Semmes, Hansen, Findeis, Munson, Shipley, Padgett, Kilhefner, 
Netherton, and Etersque. 

The department offers two basic programs of study — one leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in mathematics, and 
the other leading to the Bachelor of Science in Education degree 
with a major in mathematics. The latter degree program is specifi- 
cally designed to prepare teachers of secondary mathematics and is 
an approved program for the Georgia Teacher's Professional Four- 
Year Certificate (T-4). Students wishing to earn both the Bachelor of 
Science degree and complete the requirements for the T-4 certificate 
may do so by satisfying all requirements for both the B.S. and the 
B.S.Ed, degrees. A third degree program — Bachelor of Science with 
a major in Computer Science — has been submitted for approval to 
the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. For full 
information on this degree program, please contact the the Head of 
the Department. 

In addition to these degree programs, the Department of Mathe- 
matics and Computer Science cooperates with the Department of 
Business Administration to offer the B.B.A. degree with a major in 
Information Systems. Details concerning this degree program are 
given under the catalogue entry for the Department of Business 
Administration. The Department of Mathematics and Computer 
Science also participates in the Dual Degree Program of Armstrong 
State College and the Georgia Institute of Technology under which 
students may, in five years of study, earn simultaneously the B.S. 
degree in mathematics from Armstrong and the bachelor's degree in 
any one of a number of fields of engineering from Georgia Tech. 

Students who wish to pursue any of the above degree programs 
should consult with the department head before their first quarter in 
residence for advisement and planning of their academic programs. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Mathematics 

Quarter Hours 
A. General Education 76 

1. English 121, 122, 221 15 

2. One of the following courses: Art 200, 290, 291, 
English 222, Music 200, Philosophy 201 5 

3. One of the three sequences: Biology 101, 102; 
Chemistry 128, 129; Physics 217-218 10 

192 



Quarter Hours 

4. History 114*, 115*, and either 251* or 252* 15 

5. Political Science 113*, and one of the four 
courses: Psychology 101, Anthropology 201, 
Sociology 102, Economics 201 10 

6. One foreign language sequence** 15 

7. Physical Education 103, 117, 

and three activity courses 6 

B. Mathematics Major 50-60 

1. Mathematics 101**, 103**, 104, 201, 

202, 203 20-30 

2. Mathematics 311, 312, 316, 401 12 

3. Two of the four courses: 

Mathematics 341, 342, 402, 403 6 

4. Approved 300-400 level mathematics electives 12 

C. Related Field Requirement 15 

In addition to his other requirements, the student must 
complete fifteen quarter hours of approved courses in one 
field of study related to his major. Each course taken to 
satisfy this requirement must be approved by the student's 
advisor prior to the student's enrollment. 

D. Approved Electives 40-50 

TOTAL. . .191 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" and "Degree Requirements" sections. 

♦♦Required unless exempted by examination. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in Mathematics 

Quarter Hours 
A. General Education 81 

1. English 121, 122, 221 15 

2. Two of the four courses: Art 200, 

English 222, Music 200, Philosophy 201 10 

3. Two of the three sequences: Biology 101, 

102; Chemistry 128, 129; Physics 217, 218 20 

4. History 114*, 115*, and either 251* or 252* 15 

5. Psychology 101 and Political Science 113* 10 

6. Speech 228 5 

7. Physical Education 103, 117 and 

three activity courses 6 



193 



Quarter Hours 

B. Mathematics Major 50-60 

1. Mathematics 101**, 103**, 104, 

201, 202, 203 20-30 

2. Mathematics 311, 316, 321, 336, 401 15 

3. Two of the four courses: Mathematics 312, 

322, 337, 402 6 

4. Approved 300-400 level mathematics electives 9 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1. Psychology 301 5 

2. Education 203, 330, 441, 446, 447, 448 30 

D. Approved Electives 15-25 

TOTAL . .191 

*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" and "Degree Requirements" sections. 

**Required unless exempted by examination. 

Course Offerings 

MATHEMATICS 

MATHEMATICS 101-College Algebra. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Students must take the Mathematics 
Diagnostic Test prior to enrolling. Dates on which the test is 
administered are given in the academic calendar in the front of the 
catalogue. Present text: Hart, Basic College Algebra. 

Real number arithmetic; polynomial and rational expressions; 
linear and quadratic equations; functions and graphs; inequalities; 
absolute value; sequences and progressions; the binomial theorem; 
techniques of counting and elementary probability. 

MATHEMATICS 103-Pre-Calculus Mathematics. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or per- 
mission of the department head. Present text: Flanders and Price, 
Introductory College Mathematics with Linear Algebra and Finite 
Mathematics. 

Functions; polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and loga- 
rithmic functions; mathematical induction; complex numbers; 
matrices, determinants, and systems of equations. 

MATHEMATICS 104-Calculus I. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 or permission of the 



194 



department head. Present text: Seeley, Calculus of One & Several 
Variables. 

The derivative and its applications; introduction to integration. 

MATHEMATICS 195-Elementary Applied Mathematics. (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or its 
equivalent. (Not open to students who have successfully completed 
Mathematics 104 or its equivalent.) Present text: Hart, Mathematics 
for Managerial and Social Sciences. 

A survey of elementary analytic, linear, and finite mathematics as 
they relate to commerce, business, and life situations. 

MATHEMATICS 201-Calculus II. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. Present text: Seeley, 
Calculus of One & Several Variables. 

Techniques of integration; linear differential equations; vectors in 
the plane; polar coordinates; approximation theory; applications. 

MATHEMATICS 202-Calculus III. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. Present text: Seeley, Calculus of One 
& Several Variables. 

Infinite sequences; infinite series; three-dimensional vectors; solid 
analytic geometry; applications. 

MATHEMATICS 203-Calculus IV. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. Present text: Seeley, Calculus of One 
& Several Variables. 

Differential calculus of several variables; multiple, line and surface 
integrals; Green's and Stokes' Theorems; applications. 

MATHEMATICS 220-Elementary Statistics. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or its 
equivalent. Present text: Freund, Statistics: A First Course. 

Measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distri- 
butions; inferences concerning means, standard deviations, and 
proportions; analysis of variance; correlation; regression. 

MATHEMATICS 290-Topics in Mathematics. (5-0-5). Fall, 
Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or its 
equivalent. (Not open to mathematics majors.) Present text: 
Wimbish, Mathematics: A Humanistic Approach. 

A terminal course of selected topics designed to portray the 
history, philosophy, and aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an 
appreciation of the role of mathematics in western thought and 
contemporary culture. 

MATHEMATICS 311-312-313-Abstract Algebra I, II, III. (3-0-3 
each). 311-Fall, 312-Winter, 313-Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
203. Present text: Maxfield and Maxfield, Abstract Algebra and 
Solution by Radicals. 



195 



Classical topics in the elementary theory of groups, rings, and 
fields. 

MATHEMATICS 316-317-Linear Algebra I, II. (3-0-3 each). 
316-Spring, 317-Not offered during the 1974-75 academic year. 
Prerequisite for Mathematics 316: Mathematics 202. Prerequisite for 
Mathematics 317: Mathematics 312 and Mathematics 316. Present 
text: Anton, Elementary Linear Algebra. 

Linear systems; vector spaces and linear transformations; matrices; 
determinants; normed linear spaces and inner product spaces. 

MATHEMATICS 321-322— Probability and Statistics I, II. (3-0-3 
each). 321-Fall, 322-Winter. Prerequisite for Mathematics 321: 
Mathematics 202. Prerequisite for Mathematics 322: Mathematics 
203 and Mathematics 321. Present text: Freund, Mathematical 
Statistics. 

Probability spaces; random variables; algebra of expectation; 
random sampling; the law of large numbers; correlation and 
regression. 

MATHEMATICS 336-337-Modern Geometry I, II. (3-0-3 each). 
Not offered during the 1974-75 academic year. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 201. Present text: Ewald, Geometry: An Introduction. 

A survey of selected topics from Euclidean, spherical, projective, 
and finite geometry. 

MATHEMATICS 341-342-343-Analysis and Applications I, II, 
III. (3-0-3 each). 341-Winter, 342-Spring, 343-Fall. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 203. Present text: Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering 
Mathematics. 

Applied advanced calculus; vector analysis; ordinary differential 
equations; boundary value problems and methods of mathematical 
physics. 

MATHEMATICS 353-354-Numerical Analysis I, II. (3-0-3 each). 
Summer, 1974. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202 and Computer 
Science 110 (or its equivalent). Present text: Haggerty, Elementary 
Numerical Analysis with Programming. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear 
equations; numerical integration and numerical solution of differ- 
ential equations; matrix inversion; evaluation of determinants; 
calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary value 
problems. 

MATHEMATICS 360-Mathematical Logic. (3-0-3). Not offered 
during the 1974-75 academic year. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 
Present text: Stoll, Set Theory and Logic. 

The elementary statement and predicate calculus; formal systems; 
applications of logic in mathematics. 

MATHEMATICS 391-Basic Ideas of Arithmetic. (5-0-5). Winter, 
Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or its equivalent. (Not open 

196 






to mathematics majors.) Present text: Peterson and Hashisaki, 
Theory of Arithmetic. 

Fundamental concepts of arithmetic as they relate to the 
elementary school; current elementary school methods and materials 
used in arithmetic instruction. 

MATHEMATICS 392— Basic Ideas of Geometry. (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or its equivalent. (Not open to 
mathematics majors.) Present text: Haag, Hardgrove, Hill, 
Elementary Geometry. 

Fundamental concepts of geometry as they relate to the 
elementary school; current elementary school methods and materials 
used in geometry instruction. 

MATHEMATICS 400-Special Topics. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). Offered by 
special arrangement. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and 
permission of the department head. 

Individual readings and research under the direction of a member 
of the mathematics faculty. 

MATHEMATICS 401-402-403-Fundamentals of Modern 
Analysis I, II, III. (3-0-3 each). 401-Spring, 402-Fall, 403-Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203 and 6 quarter hours of 300-400 level 
mathematics courses. Present text: Goldberg, Methods of Real 
Analysis. 

The real number system; sequences and series; metric spaces; 
continuous functions on metric spaces; connectedness, completeness, 
compactness; the Riemann integral; the elementary functions; 
uniform convergence; the Weierstrauss approximation theorem; the 
Lebesgue integral; Fourier series. 

MATHEMATICS 406-407-Functions of a Complex Variable I, II. 
(3-0-3 each). 406-Winter; 407-Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203 
and six quarter hours of 300-400 level mathematics courses. Present 
text: Churchill, Complex Variables with Applications. 

Complex numbers; elementary functions and transformations; the 
Cauchy theory; conformal mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem. 

MATHEMATICS 416-417-Theory of Numbers I, II. (3-0-3 each). 
Not offered during the 1974-75 academic year. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 203 and six quarter hours of 300-400 level mathematics 
courses. Present text: Barnett, Elements of Number Theory. 

Divisibility and congruence; quadratic reciprocity; Diophantine 
equations; number-theoretic functions and their applications; 
selected advanced topics from algebraic and analytic number theory. 

MATHEMATICS 436-437-Topology I, II. (3-0-3 each). Summer, 
1975. Prerequisite: Mathematics 401 and Mathematics 311. Present 
text: Fairchild, Topology. 

Topological spaces and homeomorphisms; separability; compact- 
ness; connectedness; completeness; metrizability; introduction to 
homotopy theory. 

197 



MATHEMATICS 470-History of Mathematics. (3-0-3). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Twelve quarter hours of 300-400 level courses in mathe- 
matics (excluding Mathematics 391 and Mathematics 392). Present 
text:Struik, A Concise History of Mathematics. 

A survey of the development of mathematics from its empirical 
beginnings to its present state. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 110-Introduction to Computing. (4-3-5). 
Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 

BASIC programming and program structure; elementary logic and 
Boolean algebra; algorithms, flow charts, debugging; computer 
solutions of numeric and non-numeric problems; characteristics and 
applications of computers in modern society. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 231-Business Languages I. (4-3-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Computer Science 110. 

Introduction to language and programming applications for small 
computer systems with RPG; programming and applications of 
COBOL in the commercial environment; concepts of file processing. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 232-Business Languages II. (4-3-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Computer Science 231. 

Advanced COBOL programming for business applications; table 
handling, sporting, and report generating facilities of COBOL; 
processing of tape and disk files. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 241-Scientific Languages I. (4-3-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Computer Science 110. 

Programming of scientifically oriented problems in a higher-level 
language; language facilities for arrays, input/output, subroutines, 
non-numeric processing, and machine-dependent features. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 242-Scientific Languages II. (4-3-5). Fall. 
Prerequisite: Computer Science 241. 

Comparative study of scientific programming languages including 
facilities for recursion, procedures, storage allocation techniques, 
string processing, and passing of parameters. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 301-Computer Organization and Pro- 
gramming. (4-3-5). Winter, Summer. Prerequisite: Computer Science 
232 or 241. 

Introduction to systems programming via in-depth coverage of 
assembler language programming; operating systems; addressing 
techniques; internal storage structure; machine-level representation 
of instructions and data; subroutines; I/O; linkers and loaders; macro 
facilities; mass data storage facilities. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 302-Data Structures. (4-3-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Computer Science 301. 

Internal representation of arrays, queues, trees, stacks, and lists; 
hardware characteristics of large computer systems; concepts related 
to the interaction between data structures and storage structures for 
the generating, developing, and processing of data. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 306— Data and Programming Manage- 
ment. (4-3-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Computer Science 301. 

Programming methodology for processing large quantities of data; 
job control language, utility programs, and data storage and retrieval 
utilizing mass storage devices. 



198 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 320-Statistical Methods for Computer 
Programming. (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Mathematics 220 and 
Computer Science 110. 

Concepts and skills related to utilizing computers in statistical 
analyses, including the programming of statistical analyses and 
elementary simulations, the use of random number generators and 
the statistical evaluation of their output, and data analysis using 
packaged systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 341-Programming Languages. (4-3-5). 
Winter — even years. Prerequisite: Computer Science 242, 302. 

Formal definition of programming languages; specification of 
syntax and semantics; precedence rules for operators; translation 
between infix, prefix, and postfix notations; subroutines and 
coroutines; block structures; list structures; string structures. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 353-354-Numerical Analysis I, II. (3-0-3 
each). Summer — even years. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202 and 
Computer Science 110. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear 
equations; numerical integration and numerical solution of differ- 
ential equations; matrix inversion; evaluation of determinants; 
calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary value problems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 401-Systems Programming I. (4-3-5). 
Winter — odd years. Prerequisite: Computer Science 302. 

Software requirements for support of computer systems, es- 
pecially in a multiprogrammed environment; addressing techniques; 
file system organization and management; I/O; control systems; 
spooling; interrupts; reentrant code; user services; executive systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 402-Systems Programming II. (4-3-5). 
Spring — odd years. Prerequisite: Computer Science 401. 

Design and analysis of operating systems; memory management; 
name management; file systems; segmentation; paging; protection; 
resource allocation. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 406-Design of Programming Systems. 
(3-0-3). Summer — odd years. Prerequisite: Computer Science 402. 

Design of monitor systems; executive systems and operating 
systems as they relate to current generation computers with facilities 
for multi-programming; teleprocessing, real time, and interactive 
processing. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 431— Control and Organization of Infor- 
mation. (3-0-3). Fall. Prerequisite: Computer Science 232, 306. 

Information analysis and logical design of information systems and 
data bases; consideration of hardware, access methods, management 
and control functions, communicating with the data base, and 
integrated systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 432-Systems Analysis and Design. 
(3-0-3). Winter. Prerequisite: Computer Science 431. 

Principles and techniques of systems analysis, including personnel 
and machine requirements, file considerations, problem formulation, 
analysis aids, iterative requirements of the design phase, and 
implementation criteria and evaluation; readings and case studies 
related to analysis and design, and a student project incorporating 
the techniques studied in an appropriate real-world environment. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 442-Design of Compilers. (4-3-5). Spring 
— even years. Prerequisite: Computer Science 341. 

199 



Requirements for higher level digital computer language compilers, 
including symbol tables, storage allocation, object code translating 
and interpreting, syntax and semantic scans, and object code 
optimization. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 490-Special Topics in Computer Science. 
((0-5)-(0-15)-(l-5)). Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor and permission of the department head. 

Individual or group readings and research under the direction of a 
member of the faculty. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 496-497-498— Internship in Computer 
Science. (1-13-5 each). Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department head. 

Experience, in a variety of computing environments suited to the 
educational and professional aspirations of the student, under the 
direction of a member of the faculty and appropriate off-campus 
supervisory personnel. 

TYPICAL B.S. DEGREE PROGRAM IN MATHEMATICS 



FRESHMAN 
YEAR 



SOPHOMORE 
YEAR 



JUNIOR 
YEAR 



SENIOR 
YEAR 



Fall Quarter 

Mathematics 101 . 5 

English 121 5 

History 114* ... . 5 
P.E. 103 ,_1 

16 

Mathematics 201 . 5 

Lab. Science I ... 5 

Foreign Lang. I . . 5 

P.E. 2_ 1 

16 

Mathematics 311.3 
Mathematics 316 . 3 
Rel. Fid. Elec. ... 5 
Humanities Elec. . 5 
~16 

Math Elec.** .... 3 

Math Elec.** 3 

Elective 5 

Elective 5 



Winter Quarter 

Mathematics 103 . 5 

English 122 5 

History 115* .... 5 
P.E. 117 .2 

17 



Mathematics 202 
Lab. Science II . 
Foreign Lang. II 
P.E. 2_ 



Mathematics 312 . 3 

Math Elec.** 3 

Rel. Fid. Elec. ... 5 

Social Sci. Elec. . _5 

16 

Math Elec.** 3 

Math Elec.** .... 3 

Elective 5 

Elective 5 



Spring Quarter 

Mathematics 104. 

English 221 

Pol. Sci. 113* 
P.E. 1- 



16 

Mathematics 203 . 5 
History 251/252* 5 
Foreign Lang. III. 5 



Mathematics 401 
Math Elec.** . . . 
Rel. Fid. Elec. . . 
Elective 



Math Elec.** .... 3 

Math Elec.** 3 

Elective 5 

Elective 5 



16 



16 



TYPICAL B.S. Ed. DEGREE PROGRAM IN MATHEMATICS 



FRESHMAN 
YEAR 



SOPHOMORE 
YEAR 



JUNIOR 
YEAR 



SENIOR 
YEAR 



Fall Quarter 

Mathematics 101 . 5 

English 121 5 

History 114*.... 5 

P.E. 103 1 

16 

Mathematics 201 . 5 
Lab. Science I . . . 5 
Psychology 101 . . 5 

P.E. 2_ ^J 

16 

Mathematics 311.3 
Mathematics 316 . 3 

Speech 228 5 

Humanities Elec . 5 

16 

Mathematics 336 . 3 

Math Elec.*** ... 3 

Social Sci. Elec. . . 5 

Elective 5 



Winter Quarter 

Mathematics 103 . 5 

English 122 5 

History 115* ... . 5 
P.E. 117 _2 

17 

Mathematics 202 . 5 
Lab. Science II . . 5 

Education 5 

P.E. 2_ _1 

16 

Mathematics 321 . 3 

Math Elec.*** ... 3 

2nd Lab. Sci. I . . 5 

Psychology 301 . . 5 



Math Elec.** .... 3 

Math Elec.*** ... 3 

Elective 5 

Education 441 . . 5 

16 



Spring Quarter 

Mathematics 10 1. 5 

English 221 5 

Pol. Sci. 113* ... 5 



15 

Mathematics 203 . 5 

History 251/252* 5 

Humanities Elec. . 5 

P.E. 2_ 1 



Mathematics 401 
Math Elec.*** . . 
2nd Lab. Sci. II . 
Education 330 . 



Education 446 
Education 447 
Education 448 



♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" and "Degree Programs" sections. 

**Two of these courses must be selected from among Mathematics 341, 
Mathematics 342, Mathematics 402, and Mathematics 403. 

c **Two of these courses must be selected from among Mathematics 312, 
Mathematics 322, Mathematics 337 and Mathematics 402. 



200 



MENTAL HEALTH WORK 
(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology.) 

MUSIC 
(See listing under Department of Fine Arts.) 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

Associate Professor Sister M. Bonaventure, R.S.M., Head; Assistant 
Professors Bell, R.N.; Overstreet, R.N.; Cunningham, R.N.; Silcox, 
R.N.; Instructors Buck, R.N.; Keller, R.N.; G. Miller, R.N.; M. Miller, 
R.N.; Preston, R.N.; Sutton, R.N.; Tribe, R.N.; Vocational Counselor 
Shearouse. 

Associate in Arts in Nursing 

The Associate in Arts Degree Program in Nursing provides the 
student with the opportunity to obtain a general education and to 
study nursing at the college level. Graduates are eligible to take the 
state examination for licensure to practice as registered nurses. 

The nursing educational program is developed by proceeding from 
simple to complex situations in nursing which evolve from the 
fundamental needs of individuals throughout the human life cycle. 

Student nurses participate in nursing laboratory experiences at 
Memorial Medical Center, Candler General Hospital Complex, St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Georgia Regional Hospital at Savannah, and other 
community agencies. Students are assigned to the clinical area and 
are responsible for providing their own transportation. 

Students who enroll in this program have opportunities for 
personal, intellectual, and socio-ethical development, as well as 
having the personal satisfaction of becoming a member of a 
professional group which has unlimited opportunities after 
graduation. 

A passing grade in all natural science courses must be maintained 
each quarter for the student to be allowed to continue in Nursing 
courses during the freshman year. Such natural science courses must 
be satisfactorily completed before the student will be admitted to 
sophomore status in the program. The student must earn a "C" or 
better in each Nursing course before he or she will be allowed to 
register for the subsequent Nursing course; therefore, the grade of 
"C" or better in the previous course is a prerequisite for all Nursing 
courses. The student may repeat a Nursing course only once in order 

201 



to earn the "C" grade that is prerequisite for the subsequent course. 
A grade of "C" or better must also be earned in Nursing 203. An 
overall GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation from the program. 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Qtr. Hrs. Qtr. Hrs. 

Psychology 5 Political Science* 5 

Zoology 208, 209 10 English 121 5 

Chemistry 205, 206 6 Nursing 201 9 

Biology 210 5 History 251 or 252* 5 

Nursing 101 8 Nursing 202 9 

Nursing 102 8 P.E. Elective 3 

Nursing 103 ^_8 Nursing 203 10 

50 Sociology 201 ^_5 

51 

*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" section and "Degree Programs" section. 



Course Offerings - Freshman 

NURSING 101 and 1 01 -L— Fundamentals of Nursing: Selected 
Laboratory Experiences. (6-6-8). Fall Quarter. 

In this introductory course, students are given the opportunity to 
develop basic nursing skills and to learn and apply the principles to 
problem solving in the identification of the nursing care of individual 
patients. Emphasis is also placed upon foundational knowledge of 
growth and development of man, nutritional needs, pharmacology 
and communication skills. Clinical experience in community 
hospitals is given under supervision. (Exemption exams for qualified 
applicants will be considered.) 

NURSING 102 and 102-L-Maternal-Child Health; Selected 
Laboratory Experiences. (6-6-8). Winter and Spring Quarter. Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 101, Zoology 208, and Chemistry 205. 

A study of maternal and infant health care designed to strengthen 
understanding of patient-family-nurse relationships during the child 
bearing process. Focus is on a family centered approach to nursing 
care of the normal and premature newborn and the well child. 
Includes concepts of family planning as well as gynecological 
problems. Core threads are drug therapy, diet therapy, psychological 
and emotional factors affecting maternal and infant health, and 
family teaching. 

Laboratory learning is provided within the maternity, nursery, and 
gynecological areas and selected out-patient clinics. 

NURSING 103 and 103-L— Psychiatric Nursing; Selected Labo- 
ratory Experiences. (6-6-8). Winter and Spring Quarter. Prerequisites: 
Nursing 101, Zoology 208, and Chemistry 205. 

202 



The nursing problems involved in caring for patients in which the 
focus is on psychological needs of the individual who is viewed 
within a continuum of mental wellness-mental illness. The patient 
with unmet needs is considered not only as an individual but as a 
member of a family and a community. 

Laboratory learning is provided in psychiatric clinical areas and 
community agencies. 

Course Offerings - Sophomore 

NURSING 201 and 201-L-Nursing in Physical Illness I. (6-9-6). 
Fall Quarter. Prerequisite: Nursing 102, 103. 

A course consisting of the study of selected nursing problems 
relating to normal and altered physiological body processes. Includes 
study in principles of care of children and adults with nursing 
problems in medical-surgical conditions. Diet and drug therapy, 
associated communicable diseases, patient and family teaching and 
psychological and emotional factors affecting health are core threads. 
Laboratory instruction is provided within the medical-surgical, 
operating room, and recovery room. 

NURSING 202 and 202-L— Nursing in Physical Illness II. (6-9-9). 
Winter Quarter. Prerequisite: Nursing 201. 

A continuation of Nursing 201. The more common medical- 
surgical illness is considered with emphasis on major health problems. 
Nursing 201 core threads are continued and patient care before, 
during, and after surgical intervention is included. Nursing laboratory 
learning is included. Nursing laboratory learning is provided within 
the medical-surgical, operating room and recovery room clinical 
areas. 

NURSING 203 and 203-L— Advanced Nursing Problems. 
(5-15-10). Spring Quarter. Prerequisite: Nursing 202. 

A course designed to develop greater depth of knowledge and 
understanding of the nursing aspects related to the care of patients 
with complex medical-surgical problems. Emphasis is on therapeutic 
nurse-patient relationships in the care of children and adults with a 
multiplicity of nursing needs. Core threads and a patient centered, 
problem-solving approach are continued. Laboratory learning is 
provided within the intensive care unit, coronary care unit, selected 
medical-surgical units, and emergency room. 

NURSING 204-Nursing Trends (1-0-1). 

A survey course designed to assist students in understanding the 
roles of registered nurses in contemporary society. Consists of 
discussion which explores current trends in nursing practice and 
education and the legal aspects of nursing and nursing organizations. 



203 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Admission and Graduation Requirements 

The prospective candidate for the Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Nursing must meet the admission criteria of Armstrong State College. 
Admission to the program will also be dependent on the following as 
are applicable: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of a state approved school of 
nursing: associate degree or hospital diploma school. 

2. Credits earned by graduates of an associate degree program 
conducted by a legally constituted degree granting institution 
may transfer. 

3. The number of credits allowed a diploma school graduate will 
be determined by an evaluation of the applicant's school of 
nursing transcript based on criteria developed for the program. 

4. All candidates for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing 
must have passed the state board licensing examination for 
registered nurses. This requirement must be met prior to 
application for graduation. 

5. The last forty-five quarter hours of the degree program must be 
earned at Armstrong State College. 

Curriculum 

General Education Nursing 

Qtr. Hrs. Qtr. Hrs. 

English 122 5 Nursing 411 5 

English 221 5 Nursing 412 5 

Mathematics 101 5 Nursing 413 5 

Mathematics 195 or Nursing 414 8 

220 or 290 5 Nursing 415 8 

History 114* 5 Nursing 416 2 

History 115* 5 Nursing 417 3 

Sociology 315 or Nursing 418 3 

350 or 365 5 Nursing 419 3 

Psychology 301 or 42 

305 or 311 5 

Philosophy 201 5 

Elective 5 

Physical Education 3 

53 
Total two academic years 95 

*These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" and "Degree Programs" sections. 

204 



Course Offerings 

NURSING 411— Principles of Nursing Management. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. 

Designed to investigate selected principles of management science 
and leadership as applied to nursing in health agencies. 

NURSING 412— Application of Principles of Nursing Manage- 
ment. (5 credit hours). Offered concurrently with Nursing 411. 

Selected observations and experiences in the application of 
principles of nursing management in health agencies. 

NURSING 413— Introduction to Community Nursing. (5 credit 
hours). Offered on demand. 

Introduction to the concepts basic to public health, including the 
history of the public health movement, epidemiology, environmental 
control, vital statistics, community planning and organization and 
development of public health programs. Emphasis will be placed on 
selecting nursing action and planning for continuity and extension of 
patient care through cooperative hospital and public health coordi- 
nation. 

NURSING 414— Community Health Resources - Field Ex- 
periences. (8 credit hours). Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Nursing 
413. 

Observation and carefully guided practice in giving total family 
health service to a selected group of patients in varied community 
settings and in using community resources effectively in planning for 
post hospital continuity of patient care. (A car will be 
necessary.) 

NURSING 415-Advanced Clinical Specialty. (5-10-5). Offered 
on demand. 

Research and experimental based study in an area of nursing 
specialty adapted to the particular needs of the individual student. 

NURSING 416— Rudiments of Independent Study. (2 credit 
hours.) 

A review of nursing research methods with emphasis on 
design, data collection, measurement survey and analysis. 

NURSING 417-Special Problems in Nursing. (3 credit hours.) 
Prerequisite: Nursing 416. Offered concurrently with Nursing 416. 

A course in which research problems in nursing are undertaken. 
Prior consent of nursing faculty and agreement on a topic are 
required. 

NURSING 418-Independent Study. (3 credit hours.) Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 417. 

An in-depth continuation of a selected problem in nursing with 
independent field and laboratory investigation under faculty 
guidance. Final written report required. 

205 



NURSING 419-Administration of Nursing Personnel. (5-0-5). 
Offered on demand. 

Investigates theories and practices relating to the administration of 
nursing personnel in health agencies. Responsibilities of individuals in 
the performance of various personnel functions are considered. 

PHILOSOPHY 

(See listing under Department Languages and Literature.) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Roy J. Sims, Head; Associate Professor Tapp; Assistant 
Professors Alexander, Bedwell, and Kinder; Instructors Walton and 
Wilson. 

During the freshman year, all students should take Physical 
Education 117 (Basic Health) and 103 or 108 (Swimming). During 
the sophomore year, students may elect any three Physical Edu- 
cation activity courses with the last two numbers being between 01 
to 09. Students unable to participate in the regular program should 
plan an alternate program with the Head of the Department of 
Physical Education. For other department regulations, see "Physical 
Education Program" under "Academic Regulations." 

Physical Education majors are urged to complete their Core 
Curriculum requirements before entering their junior years. 

Departmental Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation Degree With a Major in Health, Physical and Recreation 
Education 

Quarter Hours 

A. Core Curriculum requirements 85 

B. One of the three courses (Required of men): 2 

P.E. 212— Coaching Football 2 

P.E. 213-Coaching Basketball 2 

P.E. 214-Coaching Baseball and Track 2 

The following course (Required of women): 
P.E. 217— Theory and Techniques of Coaching 

and Officiating Team Sports for Women 2 



206 



Quarter Hours 

C. Each of the following: 43 

P.E. 211-Safety and First Aid 2 

P.E. 215— Theory and Techniques of Coaching 3 

P.E. 216— History and Principles of Health, 

Physical and Recreation Education 5 

*P.E. 305— Corrective Physical Education 3 

P.E. 313— Kinesiology 3 

P.E. 314— Skill Techniques 3 

P.E. 315— Skill Techniques 2 

*P.E. 316— Intramural and Recreational Activities or 

*P.E. 317— Community Play, Recreation, and 

Camp Counseling 5 

P.E. 410— Philosophy of Physical Education 2 

P.E. 412— Measurement and Evaluation in 

Health, Physical and Recreation Education 5 

P.E. 413— Special Topics in Physical Education 5 

P.E. 414— Organization and Administration of 

Physical Education 5 

D. Twelve quarter hours of activity courses with 
the last two numbers being between 01 to 
09. Four of the following must be included 

in the twelve: Physical Education 103 or equi- 
valent, 106, 205, and 207 or WSI (offered by the 
American Red Cross) 12 

E. Approved Electives 17 

Must include History 251 or 252 unless 

exempted by examination with credit awarded. 

F. Education 35 

Education 203, 330, 443, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301 5 

TOTAL . .194 
♦These courses are offered only at Savannah State College. 



Course Offerings 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101-Conditioning Course. (0-2-1). 
Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts, tumbling, lifts and carries, road 
work, dual combatives, and simple games. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 102-Team Sports. (0-2-1). Winter. 
Consists of two of the following sports: basketball, volleyball, 
softball. 



207 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 103*-Elementary Swimming. (2-0-1). 
Fall, Winter, Spring. (P.E. 202 or the American Red Cross WSI 
course may be substituted for P.E. 103 or 108). 

Beginning swimming strokes, skills, and knowledge pertaining to 
safety in, on, or about water. This course or its equivalent required 
of all students. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 104-Bowling. (0-2-1). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. 

Basic skills in bowling. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 105-Badminton. (0-2-1). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. 

Basic skills in badminton. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 106-Tumbling and Gymnastics. 
(0-2-1). Fall. 

Fundamentals and practice in elementary tumbling, side horse, 
parallel bars, and trampoline. Required of Physical Education majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 107-Trampoline. (0-2-1). Winter. 

The teaching of the proper care and use of the trampoline. Under 
strict supervision, the student learns to perform the following skills: 
seat drop, knee drop, front drop, back drop, pull over, cardie, 
turntable, swivel hips, spotting, and somersaults. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 108*-Intermediate Swimming (0-2-1). 
Fall, Winter, Spring. (P.E. 202 or the American Red Cross WSI 
course may be substituted for P.E. 103 or 108). 

Five basic strokes, skills, endurance and knowledge pertaining to 
safety in, on, or about water. Required, if advised by Physical 
Education Department. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 115-Officiating of Football. (2-2-2). 

Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual 
experience in officiating in class games, intramural games, approved 
community recreation games, and public school games. Elective 
credit. Students must have permission of the department head or 
course instructor to enroll. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 116-Officiating of Basketball. (2-2-2). 
Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual 
experience in officiating in class games, intramural games, approved 

♦Either P.E. 103 or P.E. 108 is required of all students. Students may register 
for the course for which they feel qualified without taking a swimming test. The 
instructor of that course will administer the swimming test, and any student 
enrolled in the improper course will be required to change to the proper course. 
Any student who holds a valid senior life-saving certificate and/or a valid water 
safety instructor's certificate and/or passes the Armstrong swimming test may be 
exempted from the required swimming courses. 

208 



community recreation games, and public school games. Elective 
credit. Students must have permission of the department head or 
course instructor to enroll. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 117-Basic Health. (2-0-2). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. 

A basic course in health education with emphasis on personal 
health. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 200-Handball and Paddleball. (0-2-1). 
Winter. 

Basic instruction in handball and paddleball activities. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201-Elementary Tennis. (0-2-1). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. 

Instruction in class organization and methods of teaching skill in 
tennis. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 202-Senior Life Saving Course in 
Swimming. (0-2-1). Spring. 

The American Red Cross Senior Life Saving Course. (May be 
substituted for Physical Education 103 or 108). 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 205-Folk, Square, Social Dancing. 
(0-2-1). Winter. 

Instruction and practice in all forms of folk, square, and social 
dancing with emphasis on teaching techniques. Required of Physical 
Education majors. Equivalent course at Savannah State College: P.E. 
302. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 206-Beginning Modern Dance. (0-2-1). 
Winter. 

Basic Interpretative Dancing. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 207-Swimming Methods and Tech- 
niques. (0-2-1). Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 108 or equivalent. 

Methods and techniques of teaching beginning swimming skills. 
Required of majors not completing the Water Safety Instructor's 
Course (offered by the American Red Cross). 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 208-Golf. (0-2-1). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. 

Basic techniques and instruction for the beginning golfer. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 209-Intermediate Modern Dance. 
(0-2-1). Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 206. 

A continuation of Physical Education 206 with emphasis on 
dynamics, composition, and choreography. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 211 -Safety and First Aid. (3-0-2). 
Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The American Red Cross Standard and Advanced course in First 
Aid. Required of majors. Equivalent course at Savannah State 
College: H.Ed. 300. 

209 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 212-Coaching Football. (3-0-2). Fall. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, 
emphasizing methods and drills used by leading coaches. One of the 
coaching courses is required of male majors. Equivalent course at 
Savannah State College: P.E. 410 or 411. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 213-Coaching Basketball. (3-0-2). 
Winter. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, 
emphasizing methods and drills used by leading coaches. One of the 
coaching courses is required of male majors. Equivalent course at 
Savannah State College: P.E. 410 or 411. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 214-Coaching Baseball and Track. 
(3-0-2). Spring. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, 
emphasizing methods and drills used by leading coaches. One of the 
coaching courses is required of male majors. Equivalent course at 
Savannah State College: P.E. 410 or 411. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 215— Organization and Administration 
of Athletics. (3-0-3). Spring. 

A comprehensive study of theories of organization and adminis- 
tration of athletics. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 216-History and Principles of Health, 
Physical and Recreation Education. (5-0-5). Winter, Spring. 

Historical and scientific background of the practices in health and 
physical education. Required of majors. Equivalent course at 
Savannah State College: P.E. 235. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 217-Theory and Techniques of 
Coaching and Officiating Team Sports for Women. (3-0-2). Winter. 

Instruction and practice in coaching and officiating women's team 
sports such as: soccer, field hockey, basketball and volleyball. 
Required of women majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 218-Personal and Community 
Hygiene. (5-0-5). Spring. 

Principles of health with emphasis upon home, community, 
mental, and personal health. Must be taken by the major in place of 
Physical Education 117. Equivalent course at Savannah State 
College: P.E. 235. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 228-Structure and Function of the 
Human Body I. (3-4-5). Fall. 

A study of the skeletal and muscle systems of the human body. 
Credit may not be applied toward the core natural science 
requirement. Required of majors. Equivalent course at Savannah 
State College: P.E. 304. 



210 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 229-Structure and Function of the 
Human Body II. (3-4-5). Prerequisite: P.E. 228. Winter. 

A continuation of P.E. 228 with emphasis on certain human organ 
systems such as circulatory, respiratory, nervous and digestive. Credit 
may not be applied toward the core natural science requirement. 
Required of majors. Equivalent course at Savannah State College: 
P.E. 301. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 313-Kinesiology. (3-0-3). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: P.E. 228. 

The mechanics of muscles in action. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 314— Skill Techniques. (3-0-3). Fall. 

Practice in teaching methods and techniques in individual and dual 
sports such as: gymnastics, trampoline, badminton, tennis, golf. 
Required of majors. Prerequisite: the student must have completed 
courses in at least three of the sports listed or must have permission 
of the instructor to enroll. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 315— Skill Techniques. (0-2-2). Fall, 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 314. 

Laboratory experiences consisting of assisting and teaching 
individual and dual sports such as: gymnastics, trampoline, bad- 
minton, tennis, golf. Required of majors. Majors only. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320-Health and Physical Education 
for the Elementary School Teacher. (3-2-5). Winter, Summer. 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of health and physical 
education at the elementary school level. Designed to meet the 
requirement for elementary certification. Equivalent course at 
Savannah State College: P.E. 233. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 410-Philosophy of Physical Edu- 
cation. (2-0-2). Fall. Prerequisite: P.E. 216. 

Interpretation of physical education as a basic part of the living 
process. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 412— Measurement and Evaluation in 
Health, Physical and Recreation Education. (5-0-5). Fall. 

Lectures, laboratory and field experience in the development, 
evaluation and application of tests in health and physical education. 
Required of majors. Equivalent course at Savannah State College: 
P.E. 403. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 413-Special Topics in Physical Edu- 
cation. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Education 443. 

Research methods in health and physical education. Allows 
students an opportunity for in-depth pursuit into areas of their 
interests. Open to majors only. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 414-Organization and Administration 
of Physical Education. (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Education 443. 



211 



Practice and policies in establishing, administering, and evaluating 
physical education programs. Such experiences as curriculum plan- 
ning, budgeting, intramural programs, physical plant planning, and 
selection, care, and maintenance of equipment are included in this 
course. Open to majors only. Required of majors. Equivalent course 
at Savannah State College: P.E. 415. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics.) 

PHYSICS 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics.) 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professor C. Stewart Worthington, Head; Assistant Professors 
Douglass, Johnson, Lane, Palefsky, Ralston, Satterfield, and 
O'Higgins; Instructors Brown, Denham, and Tenenbaum. 

Students are advised to complete as many of the general degree 
requirements as possible before entering their junior years. Psy- 
chology majors should take Psychology 101-102 before the end of 
their sophomore years. Social Work majors should take Social Work 
101 and Sociology 201 before the end of their sophomore years. 
Suggested course distributions and annual schedules are available in 
the department office. All students are urged to seek advisement 
from their program directors with regard to degree requirements and 
scheduling. 

Associate in Science in Mental Health Work 

I. Major Field Requirements (35 hours) 
All of the folowing: 

Mental Health Work 101, 102, 201, 202, 
203, 204, and 205 

II. Related Fields (35 hours) 

A. Psychology 101, 303 or 305, 405, 406 

B. Sociology 201 

C. Social Work 303, 320, or Sociology 365 



212 



III. Core Curriculum Requirements (38 hours) 

A. English 121, 122 

B. Biology 101, 102 

C. History 251 or 252* 

D. Mathematics 101 

E. Political Science 113* 

F. Physical Education - 3 credits 

♦These courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See 
"Academic Regulations" and "Degree Programs" sections. 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology* 

I. Major Field Requirements (50 hours) 

A. All of the following: Psychology 102, 308, 312, 
410,411,412 

B. Two of the following: Psychology 307, 309, 319 

C. Two of the following: Psychology 303, 305, 311 

II. Related Fields (25 hours) 

A. Biology 101, 102, or approved technical 
sequence (10 hours) 

B. Foreign Language or Computer Programming (15 
hours or equivalent competence) 

C. Mathematics 220. 

III. Approved Electives (10 to 25 hours) 

♦Candidates for this degree should be familiar with general degree requirements 
as listed in the "Degree Programs" section. 



Bachelor of Arts in Social Work* 

I. Major Field Requirements (50 hours) 

A. All of the following: Social Work 250, 303, 320, 
451-452 or 453, Sociology 350 or 360, Sociology 340** 

B. Three of the following: Social Work 307 or Sociology 365**, 
Social Work 309 or 310, Social Work 406 or 410 

II. Related Fields (30 hours) 

A. Psychology 101, 305 and Psychology 405 or 406 

B. Mental Health 102 

C. Sociology 315** 



213 



D. One of the following: Economics 201; Anthropology 201; 
Political Science 300, 304, 305; Psychology 303; 
Sociology 423 

III. Electives (20 hours) 

♦Candidates for this degree should be familiar with general degree requirements 
as listed in the "Degree Programs" section. 

**This course is offered only at Savannah State College. 



Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 
With Mental Health Work Specialization* 

I. Psychology Courses (45 hours) 

A. Psychology 102— Introduction to 

Psychological Research 
Psychology 308— Learning & Motivation 
Psychology 312— Measurement 
Psychology 405— Behavior Disorders 
Psychology 406— Behavior Modification 
Psychology 410— History and Systems 
Psychology 411 (or 412)— Senior Seminar 

B. Two of the following: 
Psychology 307— Perception 
Psychology 309— Physiological Psychology 
Psychology 319— Animal Behavior 

II. Mental Health Courses (35 hours)** 

Mental Health Work 101— Mental Health Problems 
Mental Health Work 102— Behavior Assessment 
Mental Health Work 201— Behavior Change 
Mental Health Work 202— Clinical Agencies 
Mental Health Work 203, 204, 205— Practicum 

III. Related Field Requirements (15 hours) 

Mathematics 220 
Approved Science Sequence 

IV. Electives (15 to 30 Hours) 

**Psychology 303, 305, or 311 
**Sociology 201 

**Social Work 303, 320, or Sociology 365 
Anthropology 201, 300 

♦Candidates for this degree should be familiar with general degree requirements 
as listed in the "Degree Programs" section. 

**These courses are required in the Associate Degree program. 






214 






Course Offerings 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANTHROPOLOGY 201-Man and His Culture. (5-0-5). Offered 
on demand. 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, the 
development of human societies from preliterate beginnings, the rise 
of complex social organizations with an outline study of the major 
cultures developed by man. 

ANTHROPOLOOGY 300-Paleoanthropology. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Anthropology 201. Offered on demand. 

A survey of the data that illuminates the evolution of man. The 
major prehuman and human species, their ecology and cultures, will 
be discussed. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 450-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). By 
invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 101-Introduction to Mental Health 
Problems. (5-0-5). 

Survey of mental health facilities and institutions. Survey of 
history of mental health movement. Description of services provided, 
clients served, and administrative structure with emphasis on mental 
health agencies in Georgia. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 102-Foundations of Behavior As- 
sessment. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: M.H.W. 101. 

Objective observation is emphasized, accurate recording of be- 
havioral observations; collection and use of interview data; introduc- 
tion to case study methods; use of references in assessment. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 201-Foundations of Behavioral 
Change. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: M.H.W. 101. 

Survey of theories of personality and behavior changing tech- 
niques arising from them. Emphasis on learning theory and environ- 
mental influences. Introduction to research methodology. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 202-General Principles in Clinical 
Agencies. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: M.H.W. 101. 

Introduction to problems in establishing client-therapist relation- 
ships, interview techniques; introduction to problems of social, 
vocational and educational rehabilitation of ex-patients. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 203-204-205-Practicum. (5 quarter 
hours each). Prerequisite: M.H.W. 101. 

The student will work four hours per day, 5 days per week in a 
community agency for a period of nine months under the direct 



91 Fi 



supervision of a professional employed by the agency and under the 
supervision of the director of the mental health program at the 
college. Students will meet bi-weekly on the campus for a seminar in 
which they will discuss among themselves and with the program 
director their experiences in the various agencies. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY/BIOLOGY 100-Human Sexual Relationships. 
(3-0-3). Offered on demand. 

A scientifically oriented discussion of the anatomy, physiology 
and psychology of human sexuality. Facts pertinent to population 
problems and venereal diseases will be included. Emphasis will be on 
individual responsibility through knowledge. Credit for either 
Biology or Psychology. 

PSYCHOLOGY 101-General Psychology. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of the 
science of behavior. Discussion and demonstrations assist in survey- 
ing all the areas of psychology. Psychology 101 is prerequisite to all 
other courses in the department. 

PSYCHOLOGY 102-Introduction to Psychological Research. 
(4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Spring and Fall. 

An introduction to scientific methodolology and its application to 
behavior analysis. Various techniques of data collection and the 
statistical analysis of such data are emphasized. 

PSYCHOLOGY 301-Educational Psychology. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 101. Fall and Winter. 

The application of behavioral science to the problem of learning in 
the classroom. Primarily for teacher preparation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 303— Social Psychology. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. Fall. 

The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the 
behavior of the individual. The cultural milieu and group pressures 
will be examined in terms of their effects on behavior. 

PSYCHOLOGY 305-Developmental Psychology. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 101. Winter and Spring. 

A study of the origin and development of psychological processes. 
The effects of maturational, learning, and social variables on human 
behavior are examined. 

PSYCHOLOGY 307-Perception. (4-2-5). Prerequisites: Psy- 
chology 101, 102. Fall. 

An experimental-theoretical approach to the nature of perception. 
Special attention is given to the psychophysical methods. 



216 



PSYCHOLOGY 308— Learning and Motivation. (4-2-5). Pre- 
requisites: Psychology 101, 102. Winter. 

An examination of the methodology and theory associated with 
the various forms of learning and their motivational concomitants. 

PSYCHOLOGY 309— Physiological Psychology. (4-2-5). Pre- 
requisites: Psychology 101 and Biology 101, 102. Spring. 

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. The structure and 
function of the nervous system are studied and related to the 
behavior of humans and other organisms. 

PSYCHOLOGY 311-Theories of Personality. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 101. Spring. 

A study of selected personality theories with emphasis on normal 
behavior. Attention will be given to both experimental and clinical 
data. The determinants of personality structure and the development 
of personality will be examined from divergent points of view. 

PSYCHOLOGY 312-Measurement. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 102. Fall. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and 
validity techniques are discussed, using current psychological tests as 
examples. 

PSYCHOLOGY 319-Animal Behavior. (4-2-5). Prerequisites: 
Psychology 101, 102. Winter. 

A study of the adaptations and behaviors with which living 
organisms cope effectively with their environment. The laboratory 
will provide experience in animal care, training, and experimentation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 320— Industrial Psychology. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. Spring. 

The applications of psychology to the problems of industry. 
Primarily for business majors. 

PSYCHOLOGY 405-Behavior Disorders. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. Winter. 

A study of deviant behavior, types of behavior disorders, and 
methods of behavior modification. Application of principles derived 
from basic research will be emphasized. 

PSYCHOLOGY 406-Behavior Modification. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 101. Spring. 

A study of proven methods of generating behavioral change, their 
empirical foundations, and their applications in clinical, educational 
and social settings. 

PSYCHOLOGY 410-History of Psychology. (5-0-5). Open only 
to psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. Fall. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to 
modern behavioristics. Special attention is given to the philosophical 
basis at various times in the history of psychology. 

217 



PSYCHOLOGY 411-Senior Seminar. (5-0-5). Open only to 
senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. Winter. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected 
contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will vary from 
year to year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 412-Senior Seminar. (5-0-5). Open only to 
senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. Spring. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected 
contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will vary from 
year to year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 450-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). Open 
only by invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. 

SOCIAL WORK 

SOCIAL WORK 250— Introduction to Human Services. (5-0-5). 
Offered each quarter. 

A study of the origins and evolution of the American Social 
Welfare system, with emphasis on themes and patterns leading the 
present system and approach to services. 

SOCIAL WORK 303-Interviewing Methods and Techniques. 
(4-2-5). Prerequisite: Social Work 250 and Sociology 201. Spring and 
Fall. 

An examination of methodology in casework, group work, and 
family treatment, with emphasis on interpersonal communications, 
role playing, and recording. 

SOCIAL WORK 310— Community Social Systems. (4-2-5). Pre- 
requisites: Sociology 201 and Social Work 250. 

A socio-political study of behavior in leadership or decision 
making positions as it affects social and human needs. Examines 
public education, social welfare agencies, and health care agencies. 

SOCIAL WORK 309— Group Process. (5-0-5). Prerequisites: 
Sociology 201 and Social Work 303. Exceptions made with approval 
of professor. 

A course which utilizes the group experience documented by tape 
recorder, video tape, and subjective perceptual comparison. It is 
designed to analyze behavior patterns, roles, and interactions which 
occur within a group and to develop self-awareness. 

SOCIAL WORK 320-Ethnic Minority Groups. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisites: Social Work 250 or Sociology 201. 

This course deals with the present and factual situation of 
minority groups in America. It will cover problems, causes, agencies, 
advocates, goals, and alternatives available to minority groups. 
Emphasis is on the Black American with proportionate attention 



218 



given to the Chinese American, Chicano, native American, and other 
sizeable minorities. 

SOCIAL WORK 370— Community Service Learning Experience. 
(5 hours credit). Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Sociology 201 
and/or Social Work 250 and approval of instructor. 

This is a supervised community experience which would precede 
the more in-depth experience which comes in the field experience 
practicum. It is designed to permit a student, otherwise qualified, to 
be employed and earn 5 hours credit. The student must undergo a 
behaviorally oriented workshop and must meet with faculty and field 
instructor periodically through the work experience. He must present 
a paper and successfully complete an oral examination before 
receiving credit for the course. 

SOCIAL WORK 406-Child Welfare. (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Social 
Work 250 and 303. 

A study of child development and behavior at various life stages 
with emphasis on methods of assisting a child with social, economic, 
and emotional needs. 

SOCIAL WORK 410-Human Services to the Elderly. (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Social Work 303. 

A course designed for students going into public or private 
agencies serving the elderly. Emphasis will be placed on the social, 
economic, and health needs of the elderly with attention to delivery 
systems that work. New knowledge, research, and actual projects will 
be studied where practicable. 

SOCIAL WORK 430-Treatment of Dependence Addiction. 
(5-0-5). Summer. Prerequisite: Social Work 303. 

A course focusing on the various forms of drug and alcohol 
addiction, effective means of treatment, rehabilitation, and pre- 
vention of drug and alcohol abuse based on the latest factual and 
documented information. 

SOCIAL WORK 451-452— Field Experience. (5 credit hours 
each). 

A student experience in the delivery of human services to increase 
his knowledge and ability under professional supervision. Each 
student will work in an agency setting the equivalent of two full days 
per week. There will be a weekly meeting with the Field Work 
Coordinator. For senior social work students only. 

SOCIAL WORK 453-Field Experience Block. (15 credit hours). 

A student experience in the delivery of human services to increase 
his knowledge and ability under professional supervision. Each 
student will work in an agency setting the equivalent of five full days 
per week. There will be a weekly meeting with the Field Work 
Coordinator. For senior social work students only. 



219 



SOCIAL WORK 475— Senior Seminar. (5-0-5). Spring. 

Social work, as a human service profession, directs its attention to 
any social problem which is amenable to treatment and prevention. 
The seminar will be geared to recent changes in the structure, 
function, process, and goals of the human service delivery system and 
the underlying reasons for these changes. 

SOCIAL WORK 490-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). Invita- 
tion of professor. 

Experiential based study of a selected social work topic. 

SOCIAL WORK 491-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). Invita- 
tion of professor. 

Research and experiential based study in social work topic of 
student interest or specialty. 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 201— Introductory Sociology. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. 

An introduction to the concept and methods of the science of 
human group behavior. Includes the study of socialization, the role 
of the individual in society, and the major institutions and processes. 

SOCIOLOGY 350— Social Problems. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Soci- 
ology 201. Winter and Spring. 

An examination of behavioral deviancy, normative strain, and 
differences between social ideals and social realities in the context of 
sociological theory. 

SOCIOLOGY 360— Urban Society. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Soci- 
ology 201. Offered on demand. 

A sociological examination of human ecology, norms, social 
control, and social processes (and their changing patterns) as they 
are seen in urban social life in both a historical and contemporary 
perspective. 

SOCIOLOGY 423-<Mminology. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Sociology 
201. Fall and Winter. 

A survey of the nature of crime, criminal statistics, and theories of 
criminal causation and control. An examination of crime as a social 
problem, the criminal, and theories of punishment, treatment and 
prevention. 

SOCIOLOGY 450-Independent Study. (l-5)-0-(l-5). By invita- 
tion of the professor. Offered on demand. 

SOCIAL WORK 
(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology.) 



220 



SPANISH 
(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 

SPECIAL EDUCATION (Speech Correction) 
(See listing under Department of Education.) 

SPEECH 
(See listing under Department of Languages and Literature.) 

ZOOLOGY 

(See listing under Department of Biology.) 




221 



INDEX 

Academic Advisement 65, 93 

Academic Regulations 65 

Academic Skills Laboratory 32, 118 

Accelerated Program, High School 41 

Accounting Major Requirements 129 

Administration, Officers 12 

Admissions 34 

Advanced Placement 37 

Alumni Office 85 

Anthropology Courses 215 

Application Form 34 

Application Requirements 35 

Armstrong Summer Theatre 86 

Art Courses 165 

Associate in Arts 114 

Athletics 85 

Attendance Regulations 69 

Auditing 72 

Bachelor of Arts Requirements 92 

Bachelor of Business Administration 109 

Bachelor of Music Education Degree 112, 164 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree, 

Mathematics and Physical Education Ill 

Bachelor of Science Requirements 92 

Biology Courses 121 

Biology Department 120 

Biology Requirements 120 

Botany Courses 123 

Business Administration Courses 130 

Business Education, Program for Teachers 99 

Business Education Courses 134 

Calendar, Academic 7 

Chemistry Courses 139 

Chemistry Degree Requirements 138 

Chemistry and Physics Department 138 

Clubs 83 

College and Community Services, Office of 31 

Commerce-Secretarial Program 109 

Commission, Armstrong State College 26 

Comparative Literature Courses 184 

Computer Science, Courses in 198 

Computer Science, Degree Program in 192 

Computer Services, Office of 32 

Conditional Admission 36 

Conduct 83 

Continuing Education Students 39 

222 



Core Curriculum, University System 87 

Counseling Services 81 

Course Load 67 

Course Offerings, Index 117 

Credit by Examination 37 

Criminal Justice, A.S. and B.S. degrees 113, 144 

Criminal Justice Courses 145 

Criminal Justice Department 143 

Dean's List 69 

Degree Requirements, Regulations 65 

Degrees Offered 29, 115 

Dental Hygiene, A.S. Degree 49, 112, 150 

Dental Hygiene Courses 151 

Dental Hygiene Department 150 

Dental Hygiene Education, B.S. Degree 113, 154 

Dental Hygiene Services 85 

Dentistry, B.S. Degree Program in 30 

Development, Office of 32 

Diagnostic Tests, English and Mathematics 91 

Dropping Courses 72 

Dual-Degree Programs, Georgia Tech 30 

Early Admission Program 40 

Economics, B.A. Degree Program 109 

Economics, B.A. Degree Program 136 

Economics Major Requirements, BBA Degree 129 

Education Courses 156 

Education Degree Requirements 92 

Education Department 185 

English Courses 184 

English Degree Requirements 181 

Entomology Course 123 

Evening Classes 31 

Exemption Examinations 37, 66 

Faculty 15 

Fees 53 

Finance-Major Requirements 129 

Financial Aid 57 

Fine Arts Department 162 

Foreign Students 42 

French Courses 189 

French Degree Requirements 182 

Geography Course 176 

Georgia Intern Program 30 

German Courses 190 

Government Benefits 63 

Graduate Degrees 28, 116 

Graduate Program 28, 52, 80, 116, 118 

Heads of Departments 12 

223 



Health 85 

Health Course 209 

History of College 27 

History Courses 171 

History Degree Requirements 170 

History and Political Science Department 170 

Honor System 73 

Honors 69 

Housing 85 

Information Systems, Major Requirements 130 

Intramurals 86 

Joint Enrollment Program 40 

Journalism Course 189 

Languages and Literature Department 181 

Library * 33 

Library Science Courses 158 

Management Major Requirements 130 

Mathematics Major Requirements 192 

Mathematics Courses 194 

Mathematics and Computer Science Department 192 

Medical Technology 110 

Medicine, B.S. Degree Program in 30 

Mental Health Work, Associate Degree 114, 212 

Mental Health Work, Courses 215 

Music Courses 165 

Music Degree Requirements 162 

Neighborhood Continuing Education Center 31 

NROTC Program 33 

Nursing, A.A. Degree 45, 112, 201 

Nursing, B.S. Degree in 47, 112, 204 

Nursing Courses 202 

Nursing Degree Requirements 201 

Nursing Department 201 

Organizations 83 

Orientation 82 

Out of State Tuition 53 

Philosophy Courses 188 

Physical Education Courses 207 

Physical Education, Degree Requirements 206 

Physical Education Department 206 

Physical Education Requirements, All Students 70 

Physical Science Courses 142 

Physics Courses 142 

Placement, Office of 82 

Political Science Courses 177 

Political Science Degree Requirements 177 

Pre-Professional Programs 30 

Probation and Dismissal 71 

224 



Psychology Courses 216 

Psychology Degree Requirements 213 

Psychology and Sociology Department 212 

Publications 84 

Purpose of College 28 

Readmission of Former Students 39 

Refunds of Fees 55 

Regents, University System 11 

Regents, Staff 11 

Registration 43 

Repeating Courses 72 

Reports and Grades 68 

Residency Requirements 43 

Rising Junior English Testing Program 73 

Scholarships 59 

Short Courses, Fees 56 

Social Work Degree Ill, 213 

Social Work Courses 218 

Sociology Courses 220 

Spanish Courses 191 

Special Education (Speech Correction) Courses 160 

Speech Correction, Program in 96 

Speech Courses 187 

Staff, Administrative 13 

State Requirements, History and Government 91 

Student Activity Fee 53 

Student Conduct 83 

Student Exchange Program, Savannah State College 32 

Student Government 84 

Student Services and Activities 81 

Student Teaching 95 

Teacher Education, Programs in 96 

Teacher Education, Requirements 92 

Testing Service 81 

Two-year Degrees 29, 116 

Transfer Applicants, Requirements 37 

Transient Students 40 

Veterans 42, 63, 81 

Vocational Rehabilitation 43, 60 

Withdrawal 72 

Zoology Courses 123 



225 



1. Administration Building 

2. Victor Hall 

3. Gamble Hall 

4. Science Hall 

5. Solms Hall 

6. Jenkins Hall 

7. Student Services 

8. Memorial College Center 

9. Lane Library 

10. Fine Arts Building 
(under construction) 

11. Health Professions Education Center 
(approved for construction) 

12. Maintenance Building 

13. Gymnasium and Pool 

14. Parking Area 

15. Tennis Courts 

16. Intramural Field 




ABERCORN 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS